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Q EDD7 121CH4b 7 

California Slate Library 



Accession No. 

CaW Jfo. 



CALIFORNIA 

STATE LIBRARY 



Call No. 



VOLUME LVI. No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 1910. 



Subscription — $3.00 Per Year 




THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1910. 



MR. CHARLES L De RYDER 

is preparing a consignment of exceptional merit for shipment to our thirtieth 
sale, to be held 

FEBRUARY 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 

and will gladly superintend other California consignments. 
Mr. De Ryder has place for three more head in his 
car shipping from Pleasanton, and will accept, for 
shipment, THREE HIGH-CLASS HORSES. 

Particulars of this great sale and entry blanks may be had upon application to 
Mr. Charles I,. De Ryder, Pleasanton, Cal. 

CHICAGO UHL l¥ COMPANY 



AT 



GOOD 
HORSES 
SELL 
BEST 

AT CHICAGO 



Chicago, Illinois. 



Pleasanton, 

CAL. 



The following representative lots will 
be features at the 
February Chicago Sale: 
The PETER THE GREATS 
The RED MEDIUMS 
The OAKLAND BARONS 
The WILLIAM PENNS 
The CREYSTONES 
The ECHO BELLS 
The BARONMORES 
The PATCHEN WILKES 
The GRAYDONS 
The SIDNEY DILLONS 
The J. J. AUDUBONS 
The BARON POSEYS 
The JOHN G. CARLISLES 
The ED. CUSTERS 
The KLATAWAHS 

and drafts from every prominent training 
stable in the Middle West. 



Every Horse Should Be Clipped io Season 



It is the wise tl 
immune from 



ling to do for the clipped horse not only is easier to clean and looks better, but clipping does much to make him 
coughs, colds and the usual ills that come to a horse from standing in a coat of long, wet hair after any hard 
exertion. The prespiration evaporates quickly from the clipped animal and leaves him dry. On 
cold days a blanket when he stands keeps him comfortable. 

The Best Clipping Machine the World has ever Seen is the 

Stewart Ball Bearing Enclosed Gear Machine 

It is the easiest turning, fastest clipping and most enduring of all machines. The materials in it are 
all of better quality, the workmanship is superior. All file hard cut steel gears, protected from dust 
and dirt and running constantly in oil. It couldn't be better for twice the money. 



Write for the New Catalog Send Now 

CHICAGO FLEXIBLE SHAFT COMPANY, 204 Ontario Street, CHIGA60 



only 



1. 50 



Insure Your Live Stock 

A AN D QM&£>1 

1 




2 Horses.Mules&Cattle 

AGAINST DEATH rROM 
ANY CAUS C 

ESTABLISHED 1886 



Ctato AuontQ' w - T - CLEVERDON, 350 Sansoma St., San Pranciaco. 
Oldie A£BIIIS. j. ED VAN CAMP, Carmain Bldg., Loa Angalaa. 



LARGEST and OLDEST 
STOCK COMPANY 



Assets $350,000. 

No Assessments. 



Responsible parties with 
good bosiness desiring 
agencies apply to State 
Agents. 



HEALD'S 
BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

traina 
for 
Business 
and plaeaa 
its graduates 
in positions. 



Call or write 

425 moallister ST., 

Sen Francisco. 



WM. F. EGAN, M.R.C.V.S. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 

1155 Golden Cat* Av. 

Branch Hospital . corner Webster ana chestnut 

Streets. 

San Francisco, Cal. 




Zolock 2:054 — 



Terms: 
$50. 



McKinnay'a Pattest Entire Son 



Sire of 

Sherlock Holines2:06 R. Ambush - 2:09j< 

Delilah -2:06% Velox - - 2:09V 

Bystander - - 2:07% Boton de Oro 2:16% 
Josephine - - 2:07H Mc O. D. - - 2:11% 
etc.. etc, 

By McKinney 2:llK. dam. the great brood 
mare. Gazelle 2:11%. 

Will make a short seaaon, Doe. 1st to April 1st, at 

SAN JOSE DRIVING PARK, SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Montarey Road. 

" Address. N. S. YOUNG, San Jose 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 



ZOMBRO 2:11, 



The Great Sire ot Trotters, 



Will be in the stud at 



Los Angeles until April 1, 1910 



TERMS: $100 to insure. Money refunded if mare proves not in foal. 

ZOMBRO has 14 new standard performers for 1909, 12 new ones in 2:20, 7 In 
2:15 and 2 in 2:10. Ten of his get reduced their records in 1909. He now has 69 
standard performers, of which 39 have records of 2:20 or better, 22 have records 
of 2:15 or better, and 9 have records of 2:10 or better. No other horse living ever 
made such a showing except Zombro's sire, McKinney. Get a Zombro while you 
have the opportunity. Address GEO. T. BECKERS, 

3727 South Flgueroa St., Loa Angeles, Cal. 

Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 

Breeder and Sportsman 



\ 



Saturday, January 1, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



<^"=^.THE WEEKLY ^=>^ 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 

F. W. KELLEY. Proprietor. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific Coast. 
OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACIFIC BUILDING, 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco Post^Office. 



Terms — One Year, |3; Six Months, $1.75; Three Months. $1. 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 147, San Francisco, Calif. 

: Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name 
and address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private 
guarantee of good faith. 



2 TO ALL ITS PATRONS AND FRIENDS the 
^'Breeder and Sportsman" extends its best wishes 
and greetings on this, the opening day of a new 
^ear. May 1910 be one of health and prosperity for 
■ each and everyone of you, and may the California 
pred trotters and pacecs that race during the year 
•be attended with good luck and be among the big- 
gest money winners. A Happy New Year to all. 

o 

THE HOLIDAY NUMBERS of the Eastern journals 
devoted to horse breeding, etc., are especially good 
this season. Of those at hand up to this writing 
there is not one that is not a credit to its publish- 
ers. The Horse Review, probably the most elabo- 
rate of them all, has a very handsome cover by 
Dickey, in gold, red and green, with the face of a 
handsome brown trotter looking directly at one from 
the centre of a wreath. There are the usual num- 
ber of statistical tables in which this journal excels, 
several good stories and a number of articles of 
great interest to the breeder of the trotting horse. 
The article on "Speed Development and Speed Trans- 
mission" by Volunteer is a very strong argument in 
that gentleman's inimitable style in favor of the 
development theory. Among the other contributors 
are John Trotwood Moore, J. L. Markey, C. T. Har- 
ris, YV. R. Gilbert, Grover H. Perrigo, Dr. J. C. Mc- 
Coy, Murray Howe and others. There are over 150 
pages in the number and each and every one most 
interesting. The American Horse Breeder has also 
issued a very handsome number of about 70 pages 
replete with interesting and instructive matter. The 
cover by Duntley is in colors representing a gray 
with an expectant look standing with his head over 
a gate. The drawing is good and the coloring very 
effective. An article from the pen of H. J. Kline 
entitled "No Eagles from Hen Eggs" is an able ex- 
pose of the opposite side of the development theory 
than the one taken by Volunteer in the Review. 
Editor Parlin, Hamilton Busbey, Algernon, Milton 
Hatch, R. Boylston Hall, Geo. P. Floyd and others 
contribute articles and there is much instructive sta- 
tistical matter. The most pleasing cover illustration 
to our mind is the one that adorns the New York 
Trotter and Pacer. It is a pasture scene with 
broodmares and foals in the foreground with the 
landscape ornamented by Lombardi poplars, and 
huge clouds arising from the distant horizon across 
a deep blue sky. It is by Leigh S. Toman. Stories 
and articles on all phases of horse breeding fill the 
75 or more pages. They are by Mary M. Mears, 
Chas. G. Moser, C. A. McCully, Henry Ten Eyck 
White, Dawson E. Van Sickle, Don F. Fraser, C. J. 
Fitzgerald, E. L. Percy Smith, W. J. Carter, M. T. 
Grattan, Frank J. Kilpatrick and others. The illus- 
trations are numerous and the printing excellent. 
The Chicago Horseman also issued a very handsome 
number. The contributors are C. B. Whitford, E. 
Davenport, Henry T. White, J. B. Jackson, N. K. 
Feodossieff, Hugh E. Keough, S. Douglas Cameron, 
John Dicks Howe, Charles W. Barrell, E. L. Smith, 
Hamilton Busbey and others. One of the most in- 
structive articles is one on "Tracks and Track Build- 
ing," with diagrams giving full directions that will 
enable anyone to lay out and build mile or half mile 
tracks. The Breeders' Gazette of Chicago is the 
most beautifully printed of all the holiday papers. It 
has over 100 pages with a cover page by Frank Whit- 
ney. The half-tone reproductions of photographs of 
animals by Chas. Reid are works of art. All the 
holiday numbers have large business patronage, the 
advertising columns being artistically compiled and 
printed. Each one these holiday papers sells at 25 
cents and is worth four times that amount. 



IT IS ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY for the success 
of a harness race meeting that the fields of starters 
in a majority of the races be of fair size. Two or 
three horses competing in the principal events on 
the program is not conducive to large gate receipts, 
while the loss of revenue from entrance money in 
such cases is also large. The nearer horses are 
classified therefore, the better the chances for large 
fields of starters and consequently the nearer a 
financial success will the meeting be. Here in Cali- 
fornia it has been the custom in recent years to 
close the entries for all the purses on the entire 
circuit on a date prior to the opening of the first 
meeting. This, of course, generally results in large 
entry lists, but after two or three meetings are held 
the fields get smaller as a few horses in each class 
show extreme speed, and by the end of the season 
a very large proportion of owners are under suspen- 
sion, some for very large amounts. It very often 
occurs that an owner, poor in purse, but feeling con- 
fident that his horse will be a big money winner, will 
enter the animal in every class to which he is eligi- 
ble all through the circuit, only to have him go lame 
or get sick before making a start. Several hundred 
dollars in entrance fees will thus be against him at 
the end of the season, and he will be suspended 
with little hope of ever being able to pay it. This 
plan of early closing is all wrong, and is about the 
worst feature the trotting horse owner sees in the 
business. It can be easily remedied, and we hope 
that associations giving meetings this year will try 
to avoid this out of date plan of closing entries. It 
is the proper thing for each organization on a circuit 
to give a few early closing events, that a good horse 
will have an earning capacity sufficient to make him 
valuable, but there is no sense in forcing every horse 
to be named in all his races before he starts in his 
first one. For the majority of the class purses which 
make up a program, entries should not close earlier 
than two weeks before the meeting begins. This will 
enable an owner to enter where he will have a 
chance, make the field of starters larger, reduce th 
number of suspensions, and be beneficial all around. 
We hope the associations that give meetings this 
year will consider this subject of early closing of 
entries carefully before they make their announce- 
ments. 

o 

A NEW YEAR began this morning, and the first 
question the owners of harness horses will ask is 
"What about a California Circuit for 1910?" It 
will not be an easy question to answer just at pres- 
ent. We have everything in California but the or- 
ganization that is necessary to form a circuit. We 
have the horses, the tracks, the people and the 
best summer racing climate on earth, but we have 
no organization. If the people who control the 
tracks would only get together early in the year, 
agree upon dates and purses and make the announce- 
ment, the horse owners will do their part so far as 
nominating their horses and racing them is con- 
cerned. There are several "hundred horses that 
would be sent to trainers next month if a good 
circuit of eight or ten weeks were announced in 
January. 

THE RURAL SPIRIT of Portland, Oregon, has is- 
sued a very handsome Christmas number of 75 pages. 
From cover to cover it is filled with matters of great 
interest to stockmen, being not only profusely and 
beautifully illustrated, but neatly printed. Many 
original articles on subjects of importance to breed- 
ers are printed and it is a most delightful number 
and a credit to its -editors and publishers. 

o 

THE PACIFIC HOMESTEAD, one of the leading 
farm papers of the Pacific Coast; printed at Salem, 
Oregon, has an 85-page holiday number that is one 
of the best we have seen of the Christmas papers. 
It Is beautifully illustrated and there are articles by 
special writers on all topics of interest to farmers 
and live stock breeders. 

o 

A TRAINER'S SUGGESTIONS. 

W. O. Foote, the well known Dallas, Texas, trainer, 
in an article in last week's Horse Review, makes a 
number of suggestions looking toward the improve- 
ment of harness racing, and here are a few of them: 

A most important question is the much used hob- 
ble. Is It possible that the National and American 
associations are going to let another year go by 
without taking some action against the disgraceful 
practice of tying horses' legs together so they can- 
not break (except theirs or their driver's necks), 
and go at them with whip and spur, pound them to a 
standstill— and expect the public to turn out en masse 



and pay their money to see a lot of these so-called 
high-bred race horses and Indian drivers that are 
worth about $200 each in the fall after the races 
are over and high-priced oats become fashionable? 

I have referrence to the horses bringing $200, not 
the drivers; for I have tried it, and I doubt if the 
drivers would bring as much as the horses. If there 
is one good thing in this world that the trotting asso- 
ciations can do and ought to do, it is to abolish the 
use of hobbles in public races. How can we perfect 
a first class family of pacing horses if we allow 
every crazy and mixed-gaited "bat" that shows a 
little speed to be blind-folded, legs tied, and started 
in races where he is liable to fall down and wreck 
what good horses there may be in the race, as well 
as others of his kind. There are enough wrecks 
when all precaution possible is used without going 
premeditatedly into the game. Let's bar the straps, 
and raise some pacers that will be a credit instead of 
a disgrace to our country. 

Much has been said regarding entrance, and yet I 
think there still is chance for improvement. Any- 
one can afford to pay 10 per cent entrance if he 
can win first money. Now, make the starting fee 
less, and the additional exaction more, and you will 
have more starters and the horsemen more money. 
Charge 2 per cent entrance, cash, to start with, and 
1 per cent night before the race. Deduct 10 per 
cent from the first horse, 5 per cent from the second 
horse, 3 per cent from the third horse, and 2 per cent 
from the fourth horse; then by giving 10 per cent 
to the fourth horse, as is the custom, he will make 
a little money, otherwise he only saves his entrance. 

I am in favor of the three-heat plan of racing, as 
the association can then figure (almost to a cer- 
tainty), the time that will be required for their 
program. 

I believe in handicaps, and think they can be car- 
ried on successfully, both by horsemen and associa- 
tions. The trouble is, they have been given for too 
much money. From $1000 to $5000 is enough for a 
dash; and I believe that five separate handicaps for 
different classes would suit horsemen much better, 
and make the associations more money, than would 
one large purse equal to five smaller ones. 

I also believe that one mile (as a rule) is far 
enough to trot or pace horses. It is as far as any 
of them can carry the clip, and when a two-minute 
trotter stops to a 2:40 clip at the end of a mile and 
one-half there is little enthusiasm for the spectators. 
A very fast trotter or pacer has little show in a 
handicap race of a mile and one-half if handicapped 
according to record. 

I believe a variety of racing is what the public 
would appreciate. For instance, stallion races, dou- 
ble team races, and races under saddle. I would 
go farther to see some of our best trotters and 
pacers to a race to the pole than any other race I 
can think of. Stallion races should also be encour- 
aged, as it is not only a big advertisement for the 
stallion in the breeding business, but it would be a 
big help by way of selling your horse, which is an 
important item in the business. 

I do not favor extremely large stakes, for the en- 
trance is so large and the risk so great, that small 
and comparatively poor men cannot afford to take 
the chances on losing; therefore, very often a num- 
ber of really high class horses are left out that other- 
wise would enter. 

Another thing that, in my opinion, is wrong and 
detrimental, is the placing of a bar against green 
Jiorses the first time they win a heat, regardless of 
the amount of money won by them. For instance, 
if a green horse starts in a race and wins a heat, 
thus getting a record, say of 2:15 or better, then 
through some accident gets a bad start, makes a bad 
break, and is distanced, if disabled he is likely hung 
up for anywhere from $200 to $2,000 entrance; and 
the next season, or possibly the latter part of the 
same one, if able to race again, is compelled to start 
in the 2:15 class where he has little chance to win. 
After a man has gone to the expense of from $500 to * 
$2000 to train and get. a horse ready to race, and 
through some little accident (under our present 
rules), renders his horse useless for one season, by 
winning a heat or two, and getting a fast record be- 
fore he has even won his oats bill back, it seems 
to be a very bad state of affairs for us horsemen. 

A horse should not be put out of his maiden class 
until he has won a reasonable amount of money to 
reimburse his owner for at least part of the expense 
he has been at in order to get him to the races. A 
rule allowing all green horses a reasonable sum be- 
fore being handicapped by the first record he got, 
would encourage more men to train horses, more 
men to race horses, and more men to buy horses, 
and would in a great measure stop people from ring- 
ing horses out of their class. The runners are so 
classed and why should not the harness horse be? 
There would certainly be more horses raced, the 
associations would get more entries in their stakes 
and purses, you could sell all such horses for more 
money, because their earning capacity would be 
greater. Let the associations adopt this rule and then 
bar the hobbles, and they will do the horsemen and 
public the greatest act of kindness that has been 
done for many years. 

— o 

Palite, 15062, the son of Nutwood Wilkes 2:16V 2 
and Palita 2:16 (2) 2:16, by Palo Alto 2:08% will 
be in the stud during the season of 1910 at the farm 
of his owner, E. D. Dudley, of Dixon, Solano county, 
California. Palite is a young horse but is one of the 
coming great sires for which California is becoming 
famous. The advertisement, giving particulars of 
Palite's breeding, etc., will appear next week. His 
service fee will be $40 with usual return privilege. 



156 1 ^8 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1910. 



UHLAN'S ANCESTORS AND THEIR CON- 
TEMPORARIES. 



In the Christmas number of the Trotter and Pacer 
of New York (a magnificent number, by the way) is 
a most interesting article by Mr. Frank J. Kilpatrick 
of this city entitled "Sir Walter 2:24% and His 
Times," which we here reproduce as a chapter of 
history that is particularly interesting owing to the 
great achievements of Uhlan, the champion trotting 
gelding of 1909: 

Aberdeen has always been regarded as one of 
the greatest sons of Hambletonian, and he was 
brought forcibly to the minds of breeders by the per- 
formances of Uhlan 2:02% the past season, as 
Uhlan's dam was by Sir Walter Jr. 2:18%, son of 
Sir Walter 2:24V4, a son of Aberdeen. Sir Walter 
2:24% was a chestnut stallion, foaled 1873, got by 
Aberdeen, dam Lady Winfleld by Edward Everett, 
second dam by Long Island Black Hawk, third dam 
by Exton's Eclipse. 

Sir Walter was foaled in the private stable of his 
owner, Thomas Kilpatrick, then situated in Sixty- 
second street, between Second and Third avenues, 
New York City, and was his dam's first foal. At 
this time sons of Hambletonian had reached great 
prominence as sires of "early speed" and much was 
expected of this inbred son of Aberdeen, one of the 
greatest sons of Hambletonian 10, out of the fastest 
and gamest daughter of American Star, Widow 
Machree, 2:29. 

Aberdeen was owned by Captain Isaiah Ryndera 
of Passaic, N. J., one of the most picturesque figures 
among politicians and horsemen of his days. In his 
early years he had been a famous political gang 
leader and rough-and-tumble fighter, and many 
stories have been told of his physical prowess and 
courage and his reckless manner of life. Be that' as 
it may, my acquaintance with the doughty captain 
was during the latter days of his life, when time 
had mellowed the fighter into the blustering, kind- 
hearted old gentleman, who dined often at my 
father's board and regaled me (then a lad of 15 or 
16) with stories and traditions of his early life. His 
love for Aberdeen and every thing that pertained to 
him was almost idolatry, and he followed the growth 
and development of Sir Walter from his birth until 
his three-year-old form with a jealous eye. Sir 
Walter was a beautiful colt, a rich golden chestnut, 
with fine mane and tail, and from his colt hood he 
carried himself like a king. My father broke him as 
a yearling himself, and his interest in and affection 
for this magnificent horse of his own breeding, and 
from the beautiful mare Lady Winfleld, which had 
been his joy and pride as his favorite roadster for 
years, was one of the most touching incidents in the 
life of this deeply devout Christian man, who loved 
his God, his country, his church and his family, and 
was as devotedly loyal to all as man can be. He 
was never ashamed or afraid to stand by his colors, 
and never, even when hectored and annoyed by the 
snarling criticism of narrow-minded and bigoted 
fellow-members of the Methodist church, denied his 
love for and loyalty to what he considered one of 
Nature's noblest developments, the American trotter, 
and greatly to the credit of the trotting horse, may 
it be said, there are thousands of his class now 
endorsers and lovers of this peculiarly American 
product, 

I love to think of those Harlem Lane, Eighth 
avenue and Jerome avenue days. When a class of 
men reigned then as kings of the speedway! Com- 
modore Vanderbilt, whom I shall always consider the 
most aristocratic looking man I have ever seen, driv- 
ing Post Boy or Mountain Boy, whose ability to trot 
in 2:20 was considered wonderful, and over whom 

the partisans of the house of Vanderbilt and the 
bouse of Bonner often came as nearly "to blows ' as 
gentlemen will; for a match between Mountain Boy 
and Dexter (the peerless) was often mooted. 

Robert Bonner, with his massive head drawn into 
his shoulders like a monster turtle, with his hands 
held high driving Dexter (than whom, I can never 
bring myself to believe, there was a greater trotter 
ever born), or the beautiful Pocahontas, daughter of 
Rysdyk's Hambletonian and the whirlwind old pacer 
of the same name, or one of the many other world's 
champions he owned. What a man he was, and what 
a string of great horses he owned. Besides those 
already mentioned, he owned Keene Jim, the great 
four-year-old record holder; Centennial, a roan which 
promised wonders, but was, I think, a disappoint- 
ment; Molsey, Music, Peerless, Flatbush Maid and 
Lady Palmer, the team which he drove two miles 
to a top road wagon in 5:01*4 (I think) away back 
in the 60's. How many of our present-day gentlemen 
drivers could go out and duplicate this performance? 
Joe Elliot, the phenomenal son of Edward Everett; 
Grafton, a big chestnut, very fast; Mamie B., a 
beautiful little bay daughter of Edward Everett that 
could trot in 2:18 or 2:19 and was his son Allie's 
special favorite; Rarus. the king of kings; Lady 
Stout, which first reduced the three-year-old record 
below 2:30; Eric, the champion four-year-old, and 
many, many T do not recall to mind. What a treat 
it was to be invited up to his Tarrytown track and 
watch those great horses trot, driven by that mag- 
nificent reinsman, John Murphy! Yes, Robert Bon- 
ner was a great horseman in every sense of the word, 
ever ready to purchase a champion and pay a cham- 
pion price. His offer to pay $100,000 for a horse 
which could duplicate Dexter's performance when he 
trotted a mile to road wagon in 2:21%, wagon and 
driver weighing 319 pounds, brought forth a number 
of inquiries as to what age the horse must be. 



whether sound, and how bred, etc. Bonner replied: 
"Sound or lame, young or old, with breeding or with- 
out — all I require is that the horse trot a mile in 
2:21%, drawing a road wagon which, with driver, 
shall weigh 319 pounds." And no man undertook 
to "take down" the $100,000. Robert Bonner has 
been dead many years, but his influence for good in 
the history of the light harness horse should live 
forever. David Bonner, bis brother, whom as a boy 
I set up as my ideal of a gentleman horseman, and 
have never yet, after an intimate acquaintance ot 
over 40 years, found cause or reason to displace, and 
who is one of the few of the "old guard" who can 
be found at all of the important breeders' meetings 
of today. Frank Work, the handsomest man in New 
York, a game driver and always owner of the best. 
The intense rivalry between him and William H. 
Vanderbilt after his team Dick Swiveller and Ed- 
ward had trotted in 2:16% and had taken the honors 
of double team trotting from Mr. Vanderbilt's pair, 
Aldine and Early Rose, kept lovers of trotters keyed 
up until that memorable afternoon during which Mr. 
Vanderbilt rode into old Fleetwood Park driving 
Maud S. hooked with Aldine, and surprised the 
world, and himself more than any one else in it, by 
driving them to a top road wagon a mile in 2:15V£. 
There was much talk of a match, and the game owner 
of Swiveller and Edward was always ready and 
willing, but the match never came to a head. 1 have 
listened to many warm discussions of the merits ot 
these two teams, held on the veranda of the club- 
house at old Fleetwood, Shep. Knapp the leader of 
the hosts of Work, while Tim Eastman championed 
the cause of Vanderbilt, and although the discussions 
waxed warm at times, they always ended in a drink 
of Gabe Case's "best" and a number of impromptu 
races on the way "home." The most thrilling mo- 
ment of my life was experienced on old Eighth ave- 
nue, when a boy of 14 I was riding Lady Winfleld, 
the dam of Sir Walter, and had the temerity to 
tackle Mr. Work with his big chestnut mare, and 
we finished at the Eighth avenue railroad tracks at 
One Hundred and Twenty-fifth street neck and neck. 
Alley Bonner, as popular a horseman as ever lived; 
Probably Mr. Work enjoyed more pleasure from 
driving this famous mare Kate, which was 
practically the queen of Harlem Lane for 
years, than any other horse he ever owned. 
Jay Gould, with his pair of bob-tailed trotters, and 
almost always accompanied by his black-eyed boy 
George, now one of the giants of finance. Joe Harker, 
driving the beautiful and appropriately named pair. 
Bruno and Brunette, which held the world's trotting 
team record; William Rutter, driving his great stal- 
lion Garibaldi; Edward Kilpatrick, with his black 
mare Fanny, by Hiram Drew, afterwards the grandam 
of Excel 2:10 and Lillian R. 2:04V 2 and in later years 
his very fast "calico chestnut" gelding Crosby, by 
Chosroes; the Harbecks, father and son; Newbold 
Morris, the Chesterfield of the drive; Timothy East- 
man, the great cattle man; William H. Vanderbilt 
and his brother Fred. Occasionally Charles Back- 
man, down from Stony Ford, would ride with Mr. 
Bonner, but more often Hamilton Busbey would bp 
with his friend Robert. David or Alley. Colonel Kipp, 
whose team, wagon and accoutrements always estab- 
lished the "style"; Major Dickerson, whose rigs 
rivalled even those of Colonel Kipp, and whose 
genial personality won him more friends than almost 
any other man "on the road"; Dunn Walton, whose 
tall, athletic figure made him prominent anywhere; 
handsome, reckless Harry Hamilton, long since 
passed from the scenes of his merry life; rosy- 
cheeked Frank Ferguson ; Nathan Straus, whose 
great son of Startle, Majolica, was looked upon as a 
coming champion, and whose great race with Phallas, 
when Dan Mace handed over the great stallion to 
young Ed Bither (then nothing more than a smooth- 
faced boy), after losing two heats, and the lad teamed 
the brown stallion after Majolica in such vigorous 
fashion as to scare us friends of the little bay al- 
most "into fits." (Mr. Straus is one of the few of the 
old guard who remain loyal to their "early love.") 
Clarence Collins, always driving a crackerjack; 
"Willy" Stokes, now owner of the great Patchen 
Wilkes stock farm, the magnificent Peter the Great 
and his daughter, the holder of the world's record. 
Miss Stokes; Ed Kearney, now head of the great 
auction house, one of his favorites being a beautiful 
daughter of Sir Walter; Sam McMillan, afterwards 
park commissioner and member of Congress, and 
now owner of Bowcatcher, Wilteen and many others; 
Fred Dietz, with his beautiful little stallion Direc- 
tor's Jug, by Director, out of the dam of the then 
pacing champion, Little Brown Jug. (How's that for 
breeding?) Walter Janvier, then a bang-up driver 
of trotters on the road instead of a student of pedi- 
grees; Davy Johnson, the great bookmaker, who 
made his money with the runners and had his fun 
with the trotters; Billy Parsons, always looking tot 
a match for St. Louis, and having it out with Lady 
Barefoot, owned by Mr. Thomas: Johnny Barry, with 
his little brown mare (daughter of Winfleld Scott) 
Nellie King, and "old" Gabe Case, reefing a big rat- 
tailed bay that could draw two men in a buggy and 
beat many a good one. I could name scores more, 
but lack of space prevents, be it sufficient to say 
that a list of the New York road drivers of that day 
was practically a social "blue book." We will never 
see those days again in New York: the drives from 
the lower part of the city up to and through Central 
Park, Harlem Lane, Eighth and Jerome avenues 
are only a memory now. 

Sir Walter grew and waxed strong, and as a two- 
year-old could step a :50 gait to a road wagon. In 



the spring of his three-year-old form he was sent to 
Captain Rynders' farm at Passaic, N. J., to be trained, 
and he was put in the charge of Jesse Yearance, then 
a rosy-cheeked boy of about 20 (afterwards one of 
our best trainers and drivers), and his "develop- 
ment" began. Captain Rynders entered him in his 
three-year-old form at Suffolk Park, Philadelphia, to 
be trotted during the World's Fair there in 1876. 
The colt developed consistently and Yearance 
showed rare judgment in his method of training. By 
July he could trot the Clifton half-mile track in 2:40 
or better, and on or about August 1 trotted three 
heats in 2:39, 2:37 and 2:35, the last half of the last 
mile in 1:16. This was considered phenomenal at 
that time, and it was generally thought he stood a 
royal chance to win, although rumors had come 
from Lexington, Ky., that a filly named Woomoosa 
and a stallion named Oddfellow, and another named 
Honor had all trotted close to 2:35. Remember that 
at that date the three-year-old world's record was 
Lady's Stout's of 2:29. Captain Rynders at this time 
decided that Jesse Yearance was too young and inex- 
perienced to have the charge of so sensational a 
colt, and sent Sir Walter to Hiram Howe (a nephew 
of Hiram Woodruff), who at this time had some repu- 
tation as a handler of colts. This was unfortunate 
for the colt, as the first day Howe took him out, h*> 
worked him a quarter in 35 seconds, and lost his 
head, for such speed was phenomenal. He gave the 
colt too much, and the day of the race found Sir 
Walter stale, thin and weak, and he only took fourth 
money. Aldine by Almont (which afterward trotted 
to pole with Maud S., driven by W. H. Vanderbilt, in 
2: 15%) was returned winner, Woomoosa second and 
Oddfellow third. Time, 2:40 and 2:39. We always 
felt that if Sir Walter had been left in Yearance's 
charge at Passaic until the date of his Philadelphia 
race, he would have beaten 2:30 as a three-year-old. 

That was a memorable meeting at Suffolk Park 
in 1876. Gov. Sprague, then a five-year-old, was to 
meet Blackwood Jr., the much-touted son of Black- 
wood, from Tennessee, and I shall always remember 
that race. Budd Doble drove Gov. Sprague and won, 
but Blackwood Jr., driven by his owner, a Mr. Mc- 
Kimnion from Tennessee, carried the sympathy and 
good wishes of the crowd. The time was not sensa- 
tional, I think around 2:25, but remember that at 
that date just 26 horses in the world had beaten 
2:20. The four-year-old race was looked upon with 
much interest, for a "phenom" named Sadie Belle, 
of whose speed rumors were flying thick and fast, 
and which was said to be sired by a wild pony down 
on the shores of Virginia, was to start against 
Echora, from California (afterwards- the dam of 
Direct), Girl E., Queen, the much-touted daughter of 
Mambrino Patchen and Woodford Chief. Sadie Belle 
proved to be a slender, deer-like little chestnut with 
flaxen mane and tail, and a world of speed. She won 
the race in, I think, from 2:32 to 2:34, but Woodford 
Chief gave the little thing a great race, and she 
finished very, very tired. I believe it was found out 
later that she was not sired by a wild pony, but by a 
trotting bred horse of no reputation. 

There was a contest for a championship cup, foi 
stallions, and Sam Purdy, which Budd Doble brought 
over from California, Thorndale, Nil Desperandum. 
Blackwood Jr. and Gov. Sprague all contended for it, 
the stallion which trotted the fastest mile during the 
meeting to be declared winner. To the great satis- 
faction of the majority of those attending the meet, 
Blackwood Jr. won this cup, trotting a mile in about 
2:23; Sam Purdy, from whom wonders were ex- 
pected, being beaten by only a fraction of a second 
Horses which raced as youngsters at that meeting 
have since made trotting history. 

As a four-year-old Sir Walter started at Fleetwood 
Park in a four-year-old race against a good field and 
won the first two heats of a five-heat race in 2:34 
and 2:35, the race being won by Alice West, driven 
by Ed Geers, and this was this great driver's first 
introduction into swell Eastern trotting horse society. 
Later that fall he won a four-year-old race at Fleet- 
wood Park and took a record of 2:33. His training 
after this was of the most desultory kind, and after 
making a season or two in Orange county, he was 
given to Billy Weeks, who gave him a record as a 
seven-year-old of 2:25%. He was sent to Dr. Herr 
in Lexington, Ky., where he did not do much busi- 
ness, but was started at Lexington in 1884 and won 
in 2:25%, 2:25 and 2:24%. beating McLeod, West- 
mont and Mystery. He was then brought up to 
Holmdel, N. J., where he sired a number of good 
colts, among which was Sir Walter Jr. 2:18%, now 
famous as the sire of Blonde, dam of the great Uhlan 

Sir Walter Jr. was a very handsome, very blood- 
like chestnut stallion, with a "world of speed," and 
he should have obtained a very low record. He was 
foaled In 1880 (I think) and in 1885 started at 
Fleetwood Park, driven by W. H. Lockwood, then a 
very popular New Jersey driver and horseman, and 
who may be seen, one of the gallery, any fine day on 
the New York Speedway. Sir Walter Jr. Inherited 
from his dam, Kate Clark by American Clay, the 
fire of the close up thoroughbred cross, and in the 
early part of the race was hard to control. He fell 
away behind to the half-mile pole, but the way he 
stepped from there home, "up the hill" around the 
point of rocks, and down the home stretch of the 
old triangular track, made folks sit up and take 
notice. A brown mare named Perplexed won the 
first heat, and a chestnut whose name I have for- 
gotten won the next, and it was not until the fourth 
heat that Sir Walter Jr. got to the front. He won 
the fifth also, his heats being in about 2:23, the 
fastest of the race. The race was postponed until 



Saturday, January 1, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



& 



the next day. In the interim Major Dickinson, a good 
horseman and as kindly and genial a gentleman as 
ever lived, bought the colt from Mr. John Holmes 
of Holmdel, N. J., who bred and owned him, for 
$5,000, and put him in charge of W. E. Weeks, who 
handled him from that time on, giving him his 
record of 2:18% some two years later. Sir Walter 
Jr. was a very fast horse. It is only logical that 
the descendants of so well bred, game and fast a 
stallion should become world beaters, and we do not 
think that any good horseman will contradict us 
when we say that the great Uhlan promises to be- 
come all of this. 

— o 

WOMEN AS HORSE DEALERS. 



Can women be successful as horse dealers? In 
Surrey, England, there lives a woman who has at- 
tracted a great deal of attention as a horse dealer, 
and who, according to common report, has found the 
profession rather lucrative, says an English paper. 

She is said to have gained her experience in a 
training stable, where she established quite a repu- 
tation for her graceful and daring riding. 

For some time past she has been a prominent 
figure at various fairs and at the London sales. She 
has entirely discarded the side saddle and skirt for 
masculine attire, as being more convenient for her 
purpose in showing off the animals she intends to 
buy or sell. 

It has been suggested that by such an invasion of 
man's sphere this woman is perhaps opening up a 
new field for feminine endeavor, and the result has 
been a great deal of surmising as to whether a 
woman can really succeed in the business. 

In the opinion of men who have grown gray in 
the bartering of horses, it is just as impossible for 
a woman to become a horse dealer, in the full sense 
of the term, as it is for the proverbial camel to go 
through the eye of a needle. 

First of all, the David Harum of real life must 
know a horse as he knows the alphabet. He must 
be able to appraise a horse at a glance, and a horse 
is a very deceptive animal, as the story of many 
horse trades will bear evidence. The whole secret of 
successful dealing is the ability to tell exactly what 
the animal is worth, so as to buy him at a price that 
will insure a reasonable margin of profit. Otherwise 
the dealer might pay too much and possibly have to 
sell at a loss. 

When buying a new horse one must examine him 
thoroughly to tell whether he is sound and strong. 
The age of the animal is learned by a look at the 
teeth. The eyes must be examined in the proper 
light to detect blindness. The feet and legs must 
be felt and looked over, as the animal may be lame. 

Then, too, the horse, like the ordinary human 
being, is subject to various ills and diseases, some 
of which are not at first apparent, but may be de- 
tected only after long training. Certain ailments, 
such as glanders, are contagious. This disorder is 
accompanied by a watery discharge from the nostrils, 
and may be detected by a hard, immovable growth in 
the glands of the throat. A good dealer never buys 
a horse without first feeling his neck for indications 
of glanders. However, there are many defects which 
are not so easy to discover, so the dealer is gen- 
erally his own veterinary surgeon. 

So a thorough knowledge of horses requires the 
work of many years spent in handling and care of 
them. The successful dealer is usually the man who, 
raised on the farm or around the stable, has lived 
among horses ever since he was able to climb upon 
the back of one. Such an experience has always 
been considered outside of woman's province. 

The dealer must also be able to work a horse 
properly and must know how to show him off for 
his own satisfaction, when buying, or for the satis- 
faction of a prospective customer. To handle a green 
horse requires the exercise of a certain amount of 
physical strength and skill not usually credited to a 
woman. 

Again, the horse dealer comes into daily contact 
with a class of men who, although kind and gentle 
of heart, are often rough of manner and coarse of 
speech. They are not the class of men who care to 
deal with a woman or with whom a woman would 
care to be continually associated. 

Horsemen admit that there are many women who 
can drive or ride a horse as well as a man, and they 
concede that it is possible for a woman to do well 
in the raising of polo ponies, or some such line. 
But when it comes to bona fide horse dealing, they 
see no chance whatever for the gentler sex. 

Of course, it is perfectly possible for a woman to 
invest her money in the business and have someone 
else do the real work, but then she would not really 
be a horse dealer. Moreover, those who are simply 
investors almost invariably lose their money, for the 
reason that the man who fully understands his busi- 
ness does not need a financial backer to help him. 
He wants to shift for himself and can build up a 
business of his own. 

One dealer cited the case of a woman who for- 
merly lived back of his place. A few years ago her 
husband died, leaving her a comfortable sum. 
Rather than have the money remain idle, she wanted 
to invest It in some business, and decided on horse 
dealing, as her husband had done a little in that line. 

She put up her money and hired a man to run 
the business. He was familiar with horses, but knew 
nothing about buying and selling. The consequence 
was that In a short time the woman was penniless. 
Her loss then preyed so heavily on her mind that 
she lost her reason and ended by killing herself. 



GOSSIP REGARDING GRAND CIRCUIT. 



In about two weeks from date stewards of the 
Grand Circuit will hold their annual meeting to 
organize the big line meetings, elect officers, assign 
dates and make general arrangements for the com- 
ing year. 

This gathering is an annual event which attracts 
more real attention from racing men of the country 
than any other incident connected with the harness 
turf, consequently the matter is being discussed 
everywhere by groups of horsemen who will have 
racing strings out, or will in any way participate in 
the season's sport all along the line. 

This annual meeting had been held at the Hoff- 
man House for many years past, but President \V. \V. 
Collier of Detroit announced officially as early as 
during the Lexington meeting last October that he 
will ask the stewards to meet in Detroit next month, 
says a writer in the Telegraph. 

No reasonable fault could be found with the 
change, as prospects are that a great majority ot 
the members will come from the West, while num- 
bers attending the meeting from the East will be 
much smaller this time than during the past fifteen 
years. 

Judged by any incidents which have happened so 
far this year, from official reports, expressions o» 
opinion public or private from sources which carry 
weight, the strength of the Grand Circuit will be cen- 
tered in the Western States for 1910. As far as the 
East is concerned, the membership will not amount 
to anything, and if there is any addition to the big 
line it will come from west of Cleveland. 

Mr. Collier and members of the Detroit Driving 
Club have already given early and timely notice that 
any effort to deprive Detroit of the long enjoyed 
privilege of opening the Grand Circuit, will amount 
to nothing, and this announcement might just as well 
be considered final. 

Kalamazoo will either follow Detroit as it has for 
the past two years, or if some other track be granted 
that date, the Celery City will be in line with a 
week. 

The most probable new member of the circuit is 
now conceded to be Grand Rapids, where the Furni- 
ture City Driving Association has been a live one 
on the harness turf, owns one of the best mile 
tracks of the country and demonstrated last year 
in a most impressive manner its ability to give a trot- 
ting meeting equal to the very best on the big line. 

Grand Rapids will, no doubt, be more than wel- 
comed by horsemen, as it deserves membership bet- 
ter than many which have been granted that privi- 
lege, and are not really entitled to it. It offers just 
as many advantages as Detroit or Kalamazoo, and 
certainly is a much better place for a big race meet- 
ing than the latter, and in many respects offers 
better facilities to visiting horsemen than even 
Detroit. 

Some of the leading and most prominent citizens 
of Grand Rapids are backers of the driving associa- 
tion, and there is not the least question of doubt 
but they can offer as rich purses and stakes as any 
member of the circuit and will do so if admitted to 
membership. 

There has been some talk of taking in Terre 
Haute in the circuit and allowing the Indiana city 
the same chance that was given to Kalamazoo and 
Columbus last year; namely, as a member of the 
Grand and Great Western, a step which not only 
will be wise, but will fill up the big gap expected in 
the East. If this program be carried out there will 
be at least five weeks' Grand' Circuit racing, includ- 
ing North Randall, before any attention is paid to 
Eastern tracks. 

If Buffalo will follow Cleveland, which is not con- 
sidered extremely doubtful, that association must do 
better than it did last year at Fort Erie, otherwise 
Buffalo must be dropped in order to save the other 
Eastern tracks from the danger of having cam- 
paigners drift West again from Cleveland, as was 
partly the case last year. 

The same must also apply to Hartford, where 
the only event last year was the Charter Oak Stake 
race. The newly organized Connecticut Fair Asso- 
ciation should be left out to take care of itself unless 
a regular meeting of five days' duration, with an 
appropriately large amount of stakes and purses, is 
guaranteed to horsemen to insure at least shipping 
expenses. 

To set aside a whole week to a track with no 
more than three days' racing and three races each 
day will be an injustice to campaigning stables. 

In fact, as long as prospects in the West are 
more encouraging and promise better racing than 
in the East, no track, no matter what its past 
record and present management, should be given 
Grand Circuit dates unless a full week's sport of 
five days is guaranteed, with stakes and purses to 
amount to not less than $6,000 per day. 

A. J. Welch has already announced his inten- 
tion of staying in line with the Readville track. 
He has made a number of plans and talked of sev- 
eral so-called "innovations," yet as a full-fledged 
member of the circuit he must be made to admit that 
a full week's meeting is what horsemen exi>ect from 
him, with a sufficient amount for purses aside from 
any handicap he may decide upon or the Futurity 
Stake which is raced at Readville. 

Mr. Welch surely has some ideas of harness racing 
which deserve much attention and are highly valued, 
except one — namely, that horsemen want not more 
than four days' racing each week. If racing stables 
must be shipped to Boston, owners and trainers will 



want unanimously the full five days, and always take 
their dose if the weather proves unfavorable. 

With Racing Commissioner De Forest Settle, of 
the New York State Fair, as vice president of the 
stewards, Syracuse will surely be in the circuit, yet 
here, too, the association must be expected to give 
a full week's meeting instead of four days, besides 
its share of the amount for purses and stakes, which 
owners and racing men will expect. Unless this 
course is pursued, entries and starters on Eastern 
tracks will be much less than last year, and owners 
will shift to Western tracks more extensively than 
last season and gather at Columbus on their way 
to Lexington. 

In spite of the doubtful situation in the East there 
will still be a Grand Circuit for next season, and 
perhaps as strong as we have had in former years, 
with Detroit to open and Columbus to wind up. 
o 

The death of Clarence W. Marks in Chicago on 
Saturday, December 18th, will be deeply regretted 
by a host of horsemen throughout the country. Mr. 
Marks achieved his greatest fame in the light harness 
world when he purchased the celebrated pacer Joe 
Patchen 2: 01 %. A series of races between the "iron 
horse" and Star Pointer attracted universal atten- 
tion, and in many fast miles Marks was up behind 
the black fellow. Mr. Marks owned a considerable 
number of horses at different times, but the others 
never won any great events on the turf. Mr. Marks 
was New England born and went to Chicago when 
quite a young man and made a fortune in the whole- 
sale shoe business. Mr. Marks had an unfailing sup- 
ply of good nature and was always a welcome visitor 
at all racetracks, and for many years he was active 
in amateur driving circles, being a member of the 
Boston and the Chicago Gentlemen's Driving Clubs, 
the West Chicago Driving Club and the Boulevard 
Snow Club. During the last four years he had, how- 
ever, paid little attention to the horse. — Western 
Horseman. 



Fifty-six trotters won $1,000 or more down the 
Grand Circuit in 1909, while seven of them each se- 
cured amounts to excel $10,000. The pacers, how- 
ever, were not so fortunate, only 36 reaching the 
$1,000 stage, George Gano 2:03% alone exceeding 
$10,000. The large additional opportunities for secur- 
ing money derived by the trotters should be an extra 
inducement to owners and trainers to exercise a little 
more care with their prospects in an effort to en- 
courage them in the diagonal gait. 



M. W. Savage has issued a set of moving pictures 
on small cards that can be so manipulated as to 
show the champion pacing at top speed. The original 
of these pictures was taken from an automobile and 
shows the champion true to life. Mr. Savage has 
three complete sets of moving pictures of Dan Patch, 
one of Dan Patch and Cresceus and one of Dan Patch 
and Minor Heir. All of these pictures show every 
step of the entire mile, and when thrown on canvas 
nearly equal seeing the actual performances. 



A carload of geldings raised in Western Iowa 
recently sold in the auction ring at Sioux City, ac- 
cording to reports, for $422 per head. These were 
taken by a firm in Duluth. Another load brought 
about $385. These were mostly horses out of high- 
grade Percheron mares and by American-bred Per- 
cheron stallions. — Chicago Breeders' Gazette. 



We are reliably informed, says the American 
Sportsman, that A. B. Coxe of Paoli, Pa., during the 
past week, booked the two great young trotting 
mares, Czarevna (3) 2:07% and Muda Guy (3) 
2:1214, to Moko. It is to be hoped that both will be 
successful in producing high-class foals that will 
develop into future champions. 



Al Cummings, the Reading, Pa., trainer, has just 
purchased at a fancy figure the five-year-old green 
trotter Five Points by Monbells 2:23% and con- 
fidently expects him to prove a rare good one. A 
mile close to 2:10 is predicted for this fellow by 
those in position to know his ability. 



Detroit may not follow its usual custom of opening 
the Grand Circuit, and one of the main reasons as- 
signed is that The Horseman's $15,000 Futurity is to 
be pulled off at that point and as a benefit to the 
contestants the month of August may be decided 
on as the earliest time for holding the same. 



On the steamship Star of Australia, which left 
New York last week, the trotting stallion W. W. 
lOstill 2:21%, recently purchased there for R. C. 
Hannah of Donald, Victoria, was shipped to his new 
home. The horse is a full brother to Sonata 2:12%. 
He is to be used for stock purposes in Australia. 



The three-year-old five-gaited American saddle 
mare Golden Butterfly, by Bourbon Chief, is re- 
ported sold by D. T. Matlock of Kentucky to R. A. 
Simpson of the same State for $3,200. 

Gambetta Wilkes 2:19% now has 210 standard per- 
formers to his credit, six of his get joining the list 
in 1909. 



The dead Directum 2:05% gets a new speed siring 
son in Chambertin 2:14%, who is now credited with 
Major C. 2:19%. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



,i\L 



s 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1910. 



| NOTES AND NEWS j 

A Happy New Year to all. 



This is a good time to organize a circuit. 



Just remember that your colts and fillies take on 
another year today. 



The heading "Dates Claimed" is already appearing 
in the Eastern horse papers. 



Don't refer to that foal of 1908 as a yearling any 
longer. It is a two-year-old now. 



Register all the foals you can during the year 
of their birth. It's cheaper. 



H. D. Heacock of Phoenix, Ariz., recently pur- 
chased the pacer Major Gantz 2:08% for $3,500. 



The Occident Stake for foals of 1909 closes today 
with J. A. Filcher, Secretary, Sacramento, California. 
See advertisement. 



Mr. Armstrong, proprietor of the Pleasanton 
Training Park, expects that about 200 horses will be 
in training there by the middle of February. ; 



The Woodland track has been in good shape all 
winter. It is only during the rain storms that the 
trainers fail to use it. One day of sunshine puts 
it in fair order to work on. 

There are about twenty mile tracks in California 
that are kept in shape to train horses on during the 
spring and summer months. 



Half mile tracks are getting to be quite numerous 
in California. Why would it not be a good thing for 
their managers to organize a half mile circuit. 

Seneca Maid, the dam of that great little trotting 
mare Penisa Maid 2:04%, has been bred to Charley 
Todd, a three-year-old son of Todd 2:14%. 



Bon Voyage 2:12% will have a great bunch of 
three-year-olds out this year judging from present 
prospects. 

Gil Curry will ship the McKinney stallion Kinney 
Al 2:13% to Missouri in the same car with Mr. F. 
J. Kilpatrick's horses about January 10th. 



The stallion season will soon begin and the time 
to get out advertising and printing matter should 
not be delayed. 



The Government has decided to no longer purchase 
gray colored horses for army purposes, because the 
tendency of military life is to render all operations 
obscure. 



Tommy Murphy has driven 26 horses to records 
that average faster than 2:06. A remarkable per- 
formance and one that reflects great credit on 
Murphy's skill. 



Uniontown, Kan., a village of but 200 souls (men. 
women and children) boasts of a good half-mile 
track at which annual race meetings are given and 
purses of $400 paid for class events. 



The time is not far distant when we may expect to 
see all hoppled performers represented in all refer- 
ence publications by some particular mark of dis- 
tinction, similar to that employed to designate all 
horses that have acquired "tin cup" records. 

Mr. E. T. Cole, a prominent breeder of trotting and 
show horses, whose farm is near Wheaton, Illinois, 
is visiting the coast and was in San Francisco this 
week. He says the trotting horse market is good 
in his country and the outlook good for 1910. 

Dan Hoffman, of the Columbia stables, this city, 
is very sweet on his colt by Hal Hennessey out of 
the mare Mary K. 2:08% by Zonibro. The young- 
ster is growing nicely and can show speed at the 
pace. This is Mary K.'s only foal. 

Ed Corrigan, the former running-horse magnate, 
recently a petitioner for bankruptcy before the 
United States Court, was the first man to drive 
Robert McGregor 2: 17 'A in a race. 



It is reported Billings is to have a new track, and 
with that town in, a strong circuit can be made up 
of Glendive, Miles City, Billings, Livingston, Boze- 
man, Great Falls, Missoula, Anaconda and Butte, 
in this order. Then close with the State Fair at 
Helena. 



Chestnut Tom 2:15 is offered for sale. His owner, 
George Algeo, has gone into the retail meat busi- 
ness in Oakland and has no time to devote to this 
son of Nutwood Wilkes. Chestnut Tom has already 
proven himself a sire of early speed, as well as 
being a game race trotter, and in good hands should 
be able to earn considerable money in the stud. See 
advertisement. 



A Shire stallion weighing 1800 pounds was sold to 
a company in Washington last month for $3,800. 



Every horseman that has seen the track at Agri- 
cultural Park, Sacramento, says it is as perfect a 
winter track as there is on the Coast. 



Nine two and three-year-olds, sired by a Belgian 
stallion out of grade draft mares, were sold in Yolo 
county last month by a breeder to a dealer for 
$225 each. It pays to breed and raise that kind. 



James Thompson is training quite a string of 
horses at Sacramento. Thompson is one of the best 
conditioners in the business, and that he can handle 
2:10 speed has been proven by such horses as 
Little Thorne 2:07%, Goshen Jim 2:08%, John Cald- 
well 2:08%, Charley D. 2:06>/ 4 and others. 



There is a two-year-old colt trotter at the Sacra- 
mento track, sired by Frank Wright's stallion 
Lijero, that is a sensational trotter. Lijero is by 
James Madison, and from the looks of his colts will 
be a high-class sire. 



Frank Kenney of the Chicago Horse Sales Com- 
pany arrived in California last week and is looking 
for consignments to the big sale to be held at Chi- 
cago in February. He has already secured a big 
consignment from Charles De Ryder and expects to 
secure many more before he returns home. 



Over the grave of Hamburg Belle 2:01%, buried 
in the center of H. M. Hanna's great estate at 
Thomasville, Ga., there is to be placed a headstone 
telling of the remarkable deeds of the mare, who, 
after creating a sensation on the turf during the past 
season, died so unexpectedly. 



There is nothing like speed in a colt to bring at- 
tention to its sire. Every turf journal in the United 
States that we have seen has printed the news that 
the three-year-old son of Hal B. 2:04% stepped a 
mile at Santa Ana this fall in 2:04%. 



Don't forget that Fred H. Chase & Co. will hold 
the Third Annual Pleasanton Sale in March this 
year. It is to be the greatest sale ever held on the 
coast and those having horses to consign should cor- 
respond with Chase & Co. immediately. 



The Driving Association at Oakdale, California, is 
building a half-mile track 60 feet wide on a fine 
piece of ground near that town. A grandstand and 
stalls will also be erected, and it is also proposed 
to beautify the place by planting trees and 
shrubbery. 



It appears that Lizzie Sprague, the pacing daughter 
of Governor Sprague 2:20%, and the third dam of the 
remarkable two-year-old trotting filly Native Belle 
2:07%, was dam of but three foals, one of whom, and 
the last at that, was sired by a saddle stallion and 
passed to parties in Missouri who used him for years 
in the production of high-class saddle horses. 

The Out West Club of Los Angeles, which is a rid- 
ing club, has joined forces with the Los Angeles 
Driving Club, and assists the lather in arranging pro- 
grams for the matinees. This is an excellent idea, 
and will be of mutual benefit. There is no reason 
why the road riders and road drivers should not act 
together in giving afternoon entertainments. 



Leigh Crawford 2:24%, son of Charles Derby 2:20, 
who gained his initial standard performer the past 
season in Lee Crawford 2:11%, was owned for several 
years by Ed Gaylord, of Denver, Colo., and during 
that ownership sired the foal which later developed 
into such a successful stake winner for Joe McGuire. 
Leigh Crawford was castrated shortly after siring Lee 
Crawford, and appears in the Year Book as a gelding. 
He is out of Abanteeo 2:17% by Anteeo 2:16%. 



Mr. F. J. Kilpatrick will ship East, about January 
10th, 20 head of horses, mostly Washington McKin- 
neys, that will go to the Midwinter Auction at Madi- 
son Square Garden, New York. The horses will go 
from San Jose direct to St. Joseph, Mo., where they 
will remain at the farm of John Donovan, owner 
of Washington McKinney, until a few days before 
the New York sale, and go through from there direct 
to the Garden. These horses are now at work at 
the San Jose track and are all in fine shape. 



No stallion in America has been more consistent 
than Zombro 2:11 as a sire of horses with race rec- 
ords. Like his sire, McKinney, it is in actual races 
that his get shine. Until McKinney was sold to go 
East we do not believe he had a tin cup performer 
to his credit, and Zombro has so few that the propor- 
tion of them in his standard list is very small. In 
1909 Zombro leads all stallions as a sire of new 
standard performers with race records. The four 
leading sires of new performers are Prodigal 2:16, 
with 20; Todd 2:14%, with 19; McKinney 2:11% 
and Zombro 2:11, tied for third place with 15 each. 
Of Prodigal's 20 but six took their records in races; 
of Todd's 19 there are but nine with race records; 
of McKinney's 15 a little more than half, or eight 
of them, made their records in races, while of 
Zombro's 15, all but two have race records. This is 
a wonderful showing and stamps Zombro as the 
chief of ajl sires in 1909. We believe there were 
fewer of his get trained during the year than any 
of the four sires named above. 



W. J. Andrews will have charge of the Madden 
stable again in 1910, and he is of the opinion that it 
will be one of the strongest stables out next season, 
especially in two and three-year-olds. 



The sad news reached here a week ago that Mr. 
John Donovan, proprietor of the King Hill Farm, 
Missouri, and owner of Washington McKinney, had 
suffered the great affliction of losing by death, his 
estimable wife to whom he was devotedly attached. 



If it could be announced officially this month, that 
Salinas, San Jose, Pleasanton, Santa Rosa, Vallejo, 
Woodland, Marysville, Chico, Sacramento, Fresno, 
Tulare, Bakersfield, San Bernardino, Los Angeles and 
San Diego had organized a circuit for 1910, with two 
stakes, a trot and pace for $1000 — closing early, and 
ten other events at $500 each closing two weeks prior 
to each meeting, there wouldn't be stall room by 
March 1st on any of the leading training tracks in 
California. 



Maywood Stock Farm, Indianapolis, Ind., has made 
the following sales: To Hune Bros., Maxwell, Ind., 
the two-year-old stallion Howard Dillon 2:29%, by 
Sidney Dillon, dam Josie Detmer (dam of Henry H. 
U. 2:16%, etc.), by Paymaster. To Schawler Bros., 
Roachdale, Ind., the yearling coit by Sidney Dillon, 
dam Pique (dam of Chain Shot 2:06%, etc), by Ken- 
tucky Wilkes 2:21%. To M. T. Hunsacker, Novelty, 
Mo., the yearling colt by Sidney Dillon, dam Car- 
more, by Strathmore 408. — Horse Review. 



tl was intended to have a race meeting at San 
Jose today, but at this writing (Thursday) the 
weather does not look propitious for the event. Two 
regular purse races were to be given and Mr. Kil- 
patrick intended to give records to several Wash- 
ington McKinneys that he will ship to the Midwinter 
Sale at New York, but if the weather is bad the 
meeting will be postponed until next Saturday. 
Richard Abies is handling these horses, which are 
all green and have had less than 60 days' work. 
There are several very fast trotters among them. 



Lockinge Forest King, one of the most noted Shire 
stallions of recent years, died last month at the estate 
of his owner, B. N. Everard, Bordon, Eng. Though 
only ten years old his own winnings in the showring 
were backed up by a remarkably long list of prize- 
winning colts, which has made the name of Lockinge 
Forest King in a pedigree a guarantee of quality. 
At the last London show his get included twenty-two 
winners and reserves and he was the sire of t^e 
champion stallion and champion mare. For the last 
four years his colts have been prominent and numer- 
ous winners. 



Charles James, the well known trainer, has leased 
the McKinney stables on Thirty-sixth avenue, this 
city, and will board road horses and train them. 
These stables are up-to-date in every particular, with 
roomy box stalls and every convenience. They are 
splendidly located for road drivers, being just oppo- 
site the entrance to the Golden Gate Park stadium, 
and just north of the Hotel Cairns. Mr. James is a 
thoroughly competent man, a stickler for good feed- 
ing and cleanliness in his stables, and those who 
entrust their horses to him can rest assured that the 
very best of care and attention will be given them. 



Notice the big advertisement on page 2 of this 
issue, wherein the Chicago Horse Sale Company noti- 
fies the horse owners of the Pacific Coast that 
Charles De Ryder of Pleasanton will send nine 
horses to their sale to be held February 2lst to 26th, 
and will superintend other California consignments 
that may be made. Chicago is a good market for 
horses, as the prices obtained last year by this com- 
pany show. It is to be a great sale this year. Cali- 
fornia breeders should get the produce of their farms 
scattered through the country if they want them to 
get records and thus help the reputations of their 
stallions. The Chicago Sale offers a good oppor- 
tunity lor those who desire to sell in a good market. 
Read the advertisement and correspond with Mr. 
De Ryder. 



On our front page today is a picture that will in- 
terest a large number of our readers. The photo- 
graph from which the half-tone engraving was made 
was recently sent us by Mr. Andrew Robertson of 
Allendale Stock Farm, Mentone, Australia, who is 
well known to many of our California horse breeders, 
having been a heavy buyer of California bred trot- 
ting stock. He writes us that this picture was taken 
just a few days after the "cullud" champion had de- 
feated Tommy Burns in the match at Melbourne on 
Christmas day, 1908. The stallion Marvin Wilkes 
2:12% is a California bred horse and is the fastest 
trotting stallion ever sent to Australia. He was 
bred and owned while here by Walter Masten of 
Sacramento who raced and marked him. Marvin 
Wilkes is being well patronized in Australia and is 
bound to be a good sire. 

o ! 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



A Horseman:— We shall be very pleased to accept 
the files of the "Breeder and Sportsman" which you 
so kindly offer us. They will be a valuable acquisi- 
tion to our library, and their receipt will be grate- 
fully acknowledged. 
L. T. D., Sacramento. — There is no fixed type of 
trotting broodmare so far as we know. Every 
breeder has his ideal. The pictures of two famous 
dams of speed are printed in this issue. 



Saturday, January 1, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



OUR LOS ANGELES LETTER. 

Los Angeles, Dec. 28, 1909. 
Notwithstanding the cold and rainy weather the 
Los Angeles Driving Club gave a matinee on Chriet- 
mas day, though the program read more like a 
matinee of the Out West Riding Club, as there were 
but three harness races, instead of the general 
seven or eight harness exhibitions, the rest of the 
card being made up of exhibitions of gaited saddle 
horses, relay races, running races and an attempt 
by a lady to beat 2:45 trotting to saddle. The 2:15 
pacing class was won in straight heats by J. W. 
McLane's black mare Lady Mac. in straight heats, 
but Artesia made her step the first in 2:15 and 
I. C. Mosher with his chestnut gelding compelled 
her to tramp the second in 2:12 fiat. Lady Mac. 
is slow getting away and both the others had 
her beaten a half block at the three-eighths, but 
the way she put the speed she had in the last half 
of each heat was enough to put her in the lead 
at the wire. 

Mr. McLane's bay colt Hal Mac won his race in 
a jog after losing the first heat to O. C. Jonas' Red 
Jacket by a tangled break in the first quarter. 

In the saddle class Mrs. W. A. Glascock's Chest- 
nut King outclassed all the others in every way, 
conformation, style, action and the ability to do 
and do right everything the judges called upon 
him for and the first prize was his from the minute 
he showed in the ring. 

Miss Charlotte Gleason would have beaten 2:45 
to saddle with Lady G. by ten or twelve seconds if 
she had been a better judge of pace and had not 
ridden her horse to a couple of breaks after leav- 
ing the half, for she negotiated that distance in 
1:14%, but it took her 1:31% to get home, thus los- 
ing by % of a second. Summaries: 

Pacing, green horse class, 2 in 3 heats: 

Hal Mc, (McClain) 3 1 1 

Red Packet (Ponas) 1 3 2 

Colonel M. (McLellan) 2 2 3 

Time— 2:28, 2:26, 2:30. 

Trotting, 2:25 class, 2 in 3 heats: 

Rancho Del Paso (Hewitt) 1 1 

Leonora M. (Moorhead) 2 3 

Drummer Boy (Watkins-Stewart) 4 2 

Mazeppa (Chick) 3 4 

Time— 2:27%, 2:25. 

Liberty Song and Orena scratched. 

Pacing, 2:15 class, 2 in 3 heats: 

Lady Mc, (J. A. Stewart) 1 1 

Artesia (Jones) 2 3 

Steve Bailey (Mosher) 3 2 

Diabletta (McLellan) 4 4 

Time— 2:15, 2:12. 

Mile, trotting, under saddle to beat 2:45: 

Lady G (Miss Gleason) Lost 

Time— 2:45%. 

Fourth race, running, four furlongs: 

Golden Ledge, ch. g., Walter Coleman 1 

Cow Boy, b. g., Dr. F. Hogan 2 

Lonia, b. m., J. L. Markwell 3 

Time— :53%. 

W. W. Pager won the relay race from Mr. Chap- 
man after both their mounts had bolted through 
the carriage gate and raced half over the infield. 

Even with the varied program only about 700 or 
800 people were present and only nine harness horses 
appeared. It is high time something was done in 
this neck of the woods to revive the interest in 
matinee racing pure and simple, and not be depend- 
ent on high school horses and runners to attract a 
holiday crowd of a few hundred people. 



President C. A. Canfleld has received a written re- 
quest according to the by-laws of the Los Angeles 
Driving Club to call a meeting of the whole club to 
lay before them the plan of merging the driving 
club, the California Breeders' Association and the 
Los Angeles Harness Horse Association into one 
club, with a county fair added at which the profes- 
sional races and colt stakes can be raced and the 
matinee meetings given from November till June. 
Five of the eleven members of the board of direc- 
tors of the driving club, including the president, vice- 
president and treasurer, are heartily in favor of the 
scheme and a large number of outsiders attracted 
by the fair part of the proposition have signified 
their willingness to join the new club. Once get 
the general public interested, such as cattle and sheep 



Messrs. Canfleld and Clark will be decided on and if 
possible I will get the advertisement in in time for 
this issue of the "Breeder and Sportsman." 

J. H. Vance worked E. A. Montgomery's yearling 
Victor Mc by Red McK. a quarter in 41 seconds; he 
is growing like a weed and is one of the best lookers 
of his age at Agricultural Park. Miss Murphy, by 
the same sire, but a year older, will be sent to 
the track the first of the month to begin her educa- 
tion. Her manners are perfect now and as she 
is good gaited, she will not give much trouble. Red 
McK. himself is now in Walter Maben's charge. I 
saw him today step a slow mile in 2:25 with a quar- 
ter in 33% seconds, a couple of more workouts and 
he will easily beat 2:20. 

The bay filly Ethel G. that John Nickerson bought 




Lou Milton, dam of World's Fastest Trotter. 



raisers, fruit growers, breeders of heavy draft horses, 
carriage and harness dealers, hotel men and those 
interested in various products and manufactures that 
would like to have exhibits at a county fair each 
year, and it will not be long before there will be 
enough matinee and racing material to give a card 
of five or six races with from eight to ten starters 
in each and not be compelled to give an exhibition 
of lawn tennis or ping-pong to fill up a program. 

There will be a meeting of horsemen at C. A. 
Canfield's office tomorrow afternoon to talk over the 
new track, its width on the back stretch and home 
stretch, the advisability of having an inside track 
to jog horses on in wet weather and to work colts 
so they will not interfere with the work of the 
horses, to decide what vehicles shall be barred and 
a number of other details as to the way the new 
layout shall be conducted. At the same meeting the 
conditions of the $1000 stakes that are offered by 



at auction at Phoenix last month, is filling out won- 
derfully. Soon after her purchase she got going 
bad gaited, but a little weight has squared her away 
and now she is acting like a trotter, and with a 
little work should be a very good prospect for either 
the races or matinees, for notwithstanding she is 
a very nervous, high strung mare she is as good 
headed as the best and knows nothing but trot. 

JAMES. 

o 

PROPOSED GATHERING OF HORSEMEN. 




The annual banquet of the West Chicago Driving 
Club, which last year was given in honor of the 
Great Western Circuit stewards, at that time assem- 
bled in Chicago, proved such a popular event that 
the coming function of the same character, it is pro- 
posed, will be widened in scope so as to include, if 
possible, a combination meeting or jollification of as 
many of the minor Western Circuit officials as well, 
as it is possible to get together. Secretary Smollin- 
ger, of the Great Western Circuit suggests Monday 
evening, February 21st as a good date as that would 
be the first day of the big auction sale of speed 
horses and the sales' management state that if such 
a date is set that they will postpone their sale for 
that evening. 

It has also been suggested that as all the meetings 
of the National Association of Trotting Horse Breed- 
ers have heretofore been either held in New York 
or Lexington, that a special meeting of the Associa- 
tion at Chicago at the same time, would be a happy 
idea. President L. J. Pentecost and Secretary Charles 
P. Dryden of the West Chicago Driving Club, under 
whose auspices the banquet is held, express them- 
selves as desiring to extend the scope of the func- 
tion as much as possible and make the affair of 
national importance to harness horse interests. 



Nugget, dam of two pacers with records below 2:08. 



Much attention is being attracted to Prince Ansel 
(2) 2:20 these days. His get are showing wonderful 
speed and while they are nearly all too yonug to 
race, the majority being yearlings and weanlings, he 
will have a few two and three-yeer-olds out this 
year. 

o 

•mo\ i:u saw ANYTHING EMIVAL TO IT." 

This Is what N. C. Sbakel of Loveland, Ohio, says 
about AHSOKHINK. 

Ho writes as follows: "Have liccn usInK AHSORBINf, 
on a horse with a sprained ankle and never saw any- 
thing equal to It. Tried everything I could think of 
or ever heard of for a lame ankle for four weeks, In- 
cluding good liniments, and In 111 days after using 
the AHSOKHINK put the horse at light work on the 
farm, and In three weeks to the binder, after using 
AHHnHIilNK " 

If you have a blemished horse, write me for detailed 
Information. The remedy can be procured through 
your local druggist or sent direct, express prepaid, 
upon receipt of $2.00. , 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 54 Temple St., Springfield, 
Mass. 



8 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1910. 



ROD, GU N AND KENNEL 

CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT. 



COMING EVENTS. 



Bench SIiowm. 

■ Dec. 16-17 — North Jersey Kennel Club. Newark, N. J. 

Jas. Watson. Sec'y. 
Dec. 27-30 — Omaha Kennel Club. Omaha, Neb. C. J. 

Benson, Sec'y. 
Dec. 30-31 — Schuylkill Valley Kennel Club. Reading. 

Pa. N. E. Richards, Sec'y. 
Jan. 18-20, 1910 — North Dakota Kennel Association. 

(License.) Fargo, No. Dak. W. R. Jenney, Sec'y. 
Jan. 20-21 — Lynn Kennel Club. Lynn, Mass. M. J. 

Donlon, Sec'y. 
Jan. 26-29 — Cleveland Fanciers' Club Company. (Li- 
censed.) Cleveland, O. J. T. Conkey, Sec'y. 
Feb. 8-11 — Fanciers' Association of Indiana. In- 
dianapolis, Ind. C. R. Millhouse. Sec'y. Entries 

close Feb. 1. 
Feb. 9-12 — Westminster Kennel Club. New York 

City. Wm. Rauch. Chairman. 
Feb. 22-25 — New England Kennel Club, Boston. Chas. 

W. Taylor Jr., Sec'y. 
March 1-3 — Pine Tree Kennel Club. Portland, Me. 

Elinor S. Moody, Sec'y. 
March 1-4 — Buffalo Kennel Club. ISuffalo, N. Y. 

Seymour P. White, Sec'y. 
^larch 2-4 — Central New York Kennel Association. 

Utica, N. Y. Thos. S. Jackson, Sec'y. 
March 8-11 — Erie Kennel Club. Erie, Pa. Lyman 

T. Whitehead, Sec'y. 
March 16-19 — Duquesne Kennel Club of Western 

Pennsylvania. Pittsburg, Pa. B. Cummings, 

Sec'y. 

March 23-26— Kodak City Kennel Club. Rochester 

N. Y. Jos. H. -Church, Sec'y. 
March 21-24 — Chicago Kennel Club. Chicago, 111. F. 

A. Fisher, Sec'y. 
June 1-2 — Ladies' Kennel Association of America. 

Minneola, L I., N. Y. Mrs. R.. C. W. Wadsworth, 

Sec'y. , 

June 2-3 — Long Island Kennel Club. . 

E. H. Berendsohn, Sec'y. 
j une S — Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts. 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. Mrs. 11. M. Talbot, Sec'y. 
June 18 — Westchester Kennel Club. . 

Louis Contoit, Sec'y. 

Field Trial*. 

Dec. 27 — Mississippi Field Trial and Game Protective 
Association. Jackson. Miss. J. B. Smith, Sec'y. 

Jan. 3, 1910 — Eastern Field Trial Club. Cotton Plant, 
Miss. S. C. Bradley, Sec'y. 

Jan. 10 — Louisiana Field Trial and Kennel Associa- 
tion. . Arthur W. Van Pelt, Sec'y. 

Jan. 11 — United States Field Trial Club. Rogers 
Springs, Tenn. W. B. Stafford, Sec'y. Grand Junc- 
tion, Tenn. 

Jan. — National Championship Field Trial Associa- 
tion. To follow IT. S. trials. Hogers Springs, Tenn. 
W. B. Stafford Sec'v. Grand Junction, Tenn. 

Jan. 24 — Pacific Coast Field Trials Club, Bakersfleld. 
Cal. E. Courtney Ford, Sec'y, San Francisco, Cal. 

Jan. 26 — North Texas Field Trial Association. Fort 
Worth, Tex. C. T. Hodge. Sec'y. 

Feb. l — Lone Star Field Trial Club. San Antonio, Tex. 
E. M. Ford, Sec'y. 

THE WILD GOATS OF JUAN FFERNANDEZ. 



Introduced originally by the old-time buccaneers 
or English pirates of the Pacific, the goats on Juan 
Fernandez were intended to supply fresh meat 
whenever their importers touched at the island to 
divide their spoil. Anson mentions that the first goat 
they captured in 1741 had its ears slit by Alexander 
Selkirk 32 years previously, adding that the goats 
there possessed beards of venerable aspect and 
showed other signs of extreme old age. In such a 
remote island it is probable that these grand old 
patriarchs will long continue to browse over its pale 
green valleys and lead their flocks to safety on its 
stupendous cliffs, states a writer in the London Field. 

Juan Fernandez, or Mas-'a-tierra. with the adjacent 
islet of Masa-fuera owe their dual existence to vol- 
canic agency. Three hundred and sixty miles from 
the coast of Chile, just out of sight of the snow- 
capped peaks of Aconcagua and the Bell of Quillota, 
they stand aloof, and are seldom visited save by a 
passing man-of-war. Surrounded by forbidding 
precipices, down the gorges of which trickle a thou- 
sand rills, their high summits wreathed in trade wind 
clouds, saturated with moistures and knowing little 
frost, their vegetable growth and green wealth of 
l>asture is unsurpassed. Habitation for herds of 
wild goats undisturbed prisoners at large, growing to 
great age and size, with nothing to disturb their 
peaceful sequestered life save the bellowing of sea- 
lions and the occasional crack of a ship's rifle. 

In 1680 the Trinity sloop, Captain Sharp, put in 
here on Christmas Day; her crew caulked ship, 
felled timber, hunted goats, dried fish and washed 
clothes. They reported goats and whiskered seals 
as numerous. 

Anson made Masa-tierra his rendezvous, and found 
there a pack of large, fierce dogs, landed by the 
Spaniards to kill the goats. His sailors shot and 
ate the dogs in lieu of goat's flesh, probably then 
difficult to obtain. The flesh of seals they called 
"lamb," of sea-lions, "beef." 

The descendants of these same goats, animals 
possessed of great longevity, are still being harried 
by a few dogs, which now run mute and are kept 
in subjection for the use of man. They drive the 
goats to their only refuge, the well-worn tracks 
along the rugged cliffs, and keep them there until 
the native shepherd can get a shot, from point to 
point, as occasion requires. The immensity of these 
unapproachable precipices, so difficult of access by 
sea or land, will always prevent the goats from 
being exterminated on Juan Fernandez. Using the 
tiniest ledges for their foothold, they play follow- 
my-leader down and along these precarious goat 
tracks, following their patriarchs, drop after drop, 
until they reach a point equally inaccessible to dog 



or man, and there they dwell till shadows veil the 
mountain walls and hunger presses a return to the 
grassy slopes above. 

Underfoot no danger lurks save from the angry 
sea; a heavy rolling swell, set up by the trades over 
the vast Pacific, affords the marksman but little 
chance of accurate shooting, and landing under cliff 
is a dangerous proceeding, as we found to our cost. 
The lively boat beneath affords no steady gun plat- 
form from which to bombard the skipping goats 
above. Without good glasses these brown and tawny 
targets are difficult to detect against the deep red 
background of the great cliffs which run to a peak 
marked 1,805 feet on the Admiralty chart. 

Aided by the Chilian hunter and goatherd Maxi- 
milian, who was glad of our help, we pulled in a 
whaler round to West Bay, leaving him above to 
drive the goats to the cliffs with his two dogs. He 
was to show himself periodically and signal with 
his hat to show which way the herd was making. 
Searching the vertical cliffs with glasses from a roll- 
ing boat was no easy matter, but we discovered our 
first lot of three picking their way along a ledge 
about 600 feet up. The splash of the bullet was 
easy to see on the face of the cliff, and this proved 
a useful factor in measuring the range. A black 
billy goat, conspicuous by a white patch, offered the 
best target, and after one or two sighting shots the 
rock on which he stood was struck by a Martini 
bullet. The ricochet passed between his legs, or 
perhaps singed him, for he sprang into space, leap- 
ing grandly straight out from the cliff, struck once 
on a ledge and made a desperate effort to recover 
his footing, then, bouncing off, he turned twice over 
in the air and struck the water with a slap like a 
whale's tail. Pulling in smartly, we gaffed the 
carcass, which was just sinking, hoisted in it and 
found the bones of the face all smashed to splinters 
by the fall. No shot mark visible, the concussion 
and splash of the ounce bullet had caused that terri- 
fied spring, luckily for us seawards, while he watched 
and listened in sublime contempt of the shooting 
below. 

Highly elated with our first Juan Fernandez goat 
aboard, we paddled northward, past Selkirk Cave, 
boarded in for protection, and round the northwest 
point of the island, seven miles distant from our 
anchorage in Cumberland Bay. Heavy squalls swept 
down the steep quebradas and a nasty lop was set 
up by the breaking swell, making the boat very lively 
in the backwash and extremely difficult to shoot 
from; no landing on the rocks was possible. 

We made out Maxmilian, silhouetted against the 
skyline, on the charted peak 1,805 feet immediately 
above us, his sombrero held to the southward, mark- 
ing goats below. The glasses soon disclosed a large 
herd feeling their way slowly down the cliff, so high 
up they looked like a dark string of hopping fleas. 
The dogs could just be made out, peering over the 
edge, down which they dared not venture. One after 
the other came the long line of leaping and skipping 
goats, led by several of the oldest patriarchs, strung 
out, but always dropping from ledge to ledge, landing 
on tiny jutting footholds, just sufficient for safety, 
with marvelous poise and precision. Cloven hoofs 
of horn and rubber alone could guarantee such grip, 
such feats of acrobatic daring. There was no jostling 
on the face of eternity, each waited for the other 
with punctilious ceremony. As one leapt down the 
next followed, springing and pitching each in their 
turn upon points of rock no larger than the crown 
of a hat, no wider than the palm of your hand. Down- 
wards they came, steadily, deliberately, as if well 
aware the penalty of one false step was instant 
death. 

We opened fire heartlessly at the grizzly old leader, 
about 1,000 feet up, but the shooting was most 
erratic, the targets almost invisible. Firing only 
sufficed to keep the herd perpetually on the move; 
they worked back persistently towards West Bay. 
These goats were all black, deep chestnut brown or 
tawny yellow; most of those with white spots had 
been shot, while the survival of the fittest coloration 
held good, their protective shadows harmonizing 
exactly with the prevailing background. One of the 
leaders selected a projecting shoulder to deliberate 
on, and a ball from the .450 Express took him fair 
in the chest and dropped him back dead into a cave, 
where, no doubt as a kid, he had often sheltered 
from the tempest. The cave was, unfortunately, out 
of all human reach, both from above or below. 

With the glasses only could we make out our 
Chilian goatherd, pointing and gesticulating wildly 
600 yards up; no megaphone would have sufficed to 
transmit his shouts, and he was all but invisible to 
the naked eye, so we proceeded a la chasse alone. 
Two hours of hard work failed to drive our quarry 
to a lower refuge; we find them quietly resting 
about 1,500 feet to 1,600 feet almost vertically above 
us. Here the Express tried three rounds at the 
largest leader; the first ball kicked a puff of dust 
out of the cliff just below him, the second struck as 
much too high, for the tell-tale dust was visible; the 
third gave no sign, but hit the beast fair in the 
stomach. We watched him stagger forward, recover 
himself, then turn to the little track and crawl 



away from the herd he had led so long and well 
Climbing slowly upwards with increasing efforts, he 
just managed to gain a grass covered slope at the 
extreme top and disappeared into a gully. Doubtful 
of»ever securing either of -these goats, we headed 
back and landed under Crusoe's cave in Grassy Bay. 

The native joined us and explained in Chilian that 
the cave was out of reach, also that all wounded 
goats not knocked off the cliffs made for these In- 
accessible caves and died there. The second goat 
had reached a gulch and was hiding there badly 
wounded; a rifle might be useful in case he jumped. 
We shouldered the double Express and started off. 
Maximilian led us landwards up the steepest of 
slopes and ravines until we had surmounted 2,000 
feet, faced by the cliffs. We crawled over a dan- 
gerous ridge, and, taking our boots off, crept and 
slip cautiously about 400 feet down to the bare edge 
of the mighty drop. Here in a deep little quebrada 
lay our grand old quarry, stretched out by death, 
"mui antiguo, mui viejo," as the hunter said. He 
had just strength to reach the edge of this awful 
declivity in time to die in this friendly dip and save 
himself that last long tumble he had been spared 
so long. 

With the rifle an incumbrance we left it and 
cartridges behind, taking our hunting knives in our 
teeth we helped each other gingerly down. The 
strong smelling patriarch was too heavy to lift or 
pack when paunched (they weigh up to 150 pounds), 
so we started to skin him as he lay. The knif6 
brought away the little one-half-ounce bullet,, now 
in mushroom shape, from under the skin of the 
back; it had perforated the vitals upwards, but al- 
though driven by 120 grains of Curtis & Harvey's 
"best diamond black,'' its energy at such an altitude 
was all but expended, and it had failed to penetrate 
the tough skin a second time; no bones had been 
met, either, to check its career. 

Maximilian tied the head round his neck, and with 
the bullet in one's mouth, and the clinging, skin on 
one's back, we regained the ridge, but not before we 
had kicked and rolled the carcass over the cliff. It 
turned one quite giddy to watch its fall, striking, 
once, twice, bouncing outwards, till it reached the 
blue water beneath, and, without the hide that had 
kept it together, burst like a shell on impact. Sharks, 
dogfish, barracouta and crayfish deserved it more 
than the rats which abounded, and no doubt the 
finny tribe much appreciated the finale. 

The head, well mounted by Rowland Ward, hangs 
outside over our front door, for the offensive aroma 
still given off by the long-bearded trophy, in spite 
of petrol and spirits of turpentine, prevents its ac- 
ceptance indoors. 

The next day we spent in collecting humming 
birds and fern roots for South Kensington and Kew; 
we also ascended to Selkirk's lookout, 2,400 feet, 
where he daily watched for sail or sign, arid we 
gave his memorial tablet a coat of red lead. Erected 
by the officers of H. M. S. Topaze in 1868, we had 
the good fortune to repaint it in 1876 and again in 
1885. On each occasion our companion was one of 
the original Topaze officers who had placed it there. 
Both since have joined Selkirk in happier hunting 
grounds, it is to be hoped, than those of which a 
description has been here attempted. 



Duck Hunting in Utah. — A recent report from Sajt 
Lake City states: The unusually cold weather has 
spoiled the shooting in most localities, owing to the 
streams and lakes being frozen over. Sportsmen find 
i: almost impossible to get within shooting distance 
of the ducks, except where there is s till same open 
water. The mouth of the Jordan river, affords prob- 
ably the best shooting ground in- fHev immediate 
vicinity of this city, however, and' large* parties of 
duck hunters are to be seen in this neighborhood. 

The most common wild duck in- Utah, seems to 
be teal, with mallard running a close seconti. Some 
canvasback have been bagged, but this species is 
rare, and it is only once in a great whinr;that any 
are secured. Teal and mallard, however,, are much 
in demand. 

According to. Salt Lake sportsmen, this.r-pas been 
one of the most successful years ever knowil in their 
annals of duck shooting. The game la_ws of the 
State are rigidly enforced, and few cases oB gunners 
taking more than they are allowed by the jaw have 
been reported, 'the season closed December 31st. 



Will Rival Tunas. — A school of eight or t£n black- 
fish passed the Newport wharf Thursday morning of 
last week. The fish appeared to*, be about 30 feet 
long and came to the surface to spout lik$ whales. 
Blackfish feed upon porpoises, and it is a stirring 
sight to see them in punsnit of these sea pigs. 

The Southern California press agents will now 
have material for new fish stories. 



The Quakers Won. — Word received by members of 
the Los Angeles Revolver Club in regard to the 
United States Revolver Association Leaggfc contest 
of December 9th between the Los Angeleiwclub and 
the Philadelphia Rifle Association sho«stfijjthat the 
Los Angeles club was defeated by 70 potlts. The 
Philadelphia score was 1056 and the I^is! Angeles 
score 986. ' j 
o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January 1, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



REGARDING THE STATE FISH AND GAME 
COMMISSION. 

In an issue of the Ukiah Times somewhat re- 
cently there appeared an article concerning the 
State Fish and Game Commission. Among other 
statements, the assertion was made that the Com- 
mission had collected $184,467.70 in 1907, of which 
$100,000 had not been accounted for. For 1908, it 
was claimed, the amount collected was $352,475.24, 
and of which at least $250,000 had been devoted to 
the use and support of the "Machine" — "as there 
was nothing else to show for it." Meaning that the 
only presumption as to the channels through which 
this sum had passed were improper, as there had 
been no showing of a legally authorized dispensa- 
tion of the amount. 

These statements, and others in the article, 
elicited many objections. Mr. George H. Rhodes, 
editor of The Times, requested in due course of Mr. 
Vogelsang, the Secretary of the Commission, "to 
make a report for publication in order to set the 
matter right before the people." 

In response the letter given below, dated Novem- 
ber 24th, was forthcoming. Much of the matter is 
self-explanatory, all of it is of interest to the sports- 
men of this State. 

A copy of this letter was forwarded to Hon. A. B. 
Nye, State Controller, at Sacramento. This state- 
ment met with approval and endorsement, for, 
among other things in his reply, Mr. Nye says: 

"Yours of November 27th is at hand, and I read 
with a great deal of interest your letter to Mr. 
Rhodes of Ukiah. I hope he prints your letter in 
full, and if he does so you ought to secure copies 
of his paper and mail them to other newspapers 
throughout the State, for you have made a first- 
class presentation of the subject from the stand- 
point of the Commission. * * * " 

"Public officers should go out of the way to see 
that correct information is spread before the peo- 
ple. * * * It is the right of the people to know 
about their own affairs.'' 

The letter of Mr. Vogelsang above referred to 
follows: 

"I regret that I could not reply earlier to your 
recent communication in which you desired to have 
some information concerning our work, the distribu- 
tion of our funds, and to what extent reports have 
been made, and enclosing also a clipping from your 
paper, the Ukiah Times, relative to the disposition 
of fines paid for violations of the fish and game 
laws, and the payment of expenses incurred in the 
prosecution of violators of these laws. I appreciate 
very much the inquiry and the opportunity it gives 
me to present the facts in the matter; in other words, 
to show the people of the county that all such ex- 
penses are, and have been, borne by the State. Owing 
to a bereavement in my own family, and the death 
of our own chief clerk, Mr. E. G. Heacock, one of the 
most conscientious and capable of men, my com- 
pliance with your request is somewhat tardy. 

I will take up first the matter of the amount that 
has been paid into your county during the last two 
years, for which we have receipts in this office. Foi- 
justices' and constables' fees, Superior Court trials 
and all the expenses attendant thereon, the sum of 
$839.50 has been paid. We have also paid for the 
board of prisoners who were convicted and went to 
jail. The amount received in fines from all over the 
State leaves very little, if anything, on the credit, 
side of the ledger. These expenses are paid, win or 
lose. Superior Court trials cost anywhere from $100 
to $400 — depending upon the mileage of jurors and 
length of trial, court reporters' fees, etc. Sometimes 
the amount is larger; for example, in May last we 
paid Plumas county the sum of $1,555.37, which ex- 
pense was incurred in the prosecution of 14 men 
arrested for dynamiting fish. Twelve of these men 
were convicted; two only paid fines; the others each 
served five months in jail. The k^ep of the prisoners, 
the expenses incident to three Superior Court trials, 
the bringing of witnesses from long distances, and 
jurors' fees, aggregated that sum. Receipted and 
itemized bills showing these expenditures are on file 
in this office and also in the office of the State Con- 
troller. 

It has been stated that it costs the State about 
five times as much to run the Commission as it did 
ten years ago. Briefly stated, the Commission has 
now a salary list in all departments ranging from 
90 to 97 people, against 18 in July of 1898. At that 
time the appropriation from the general fund of the 
State for the biennial period was $47,000. Today, 
with five times the force, the drain on the general 
fund of the State is $40,000; in other words, $20,000 
a year for the support and maintenance of commer- 
cial hatcheries, and is therefore costing the State 
with a working force of upwards of 90 men, $7,000 
less than it did with a force of 18 ten years ago. It 
is true the Commission expends a great deal more 
money and has more at its command, but it is derived 
from those who either make a living out of our 
work or derive a pleasure from it. in other words, 
the fellow who dances is paying the fiddler. There 
are only about 10 per cent of the people in any 
country, State or community who are interested in 
hunting or fishing, and that 10 per cent pays for the 
support of the institution from which it derives so 
much benefit; the other 90 per cent are relieved. 

in 1898 the State had four hatchery buildings— one 
at Sisson and got an appropriation of $5,000 to build 
one on Eel river, and had two insignificant hatcheries 
on Lake Tahoe. Out of our own funds, without ask- 
ing the State for a cent of appropriation, we have 



more than quadrupled the hatchery capacity at 
Sisson. We have four large hatchery buildings there 
and three on Lake Tahoe; the later one built a year 
ago has four times the capacity of those we had in 
1898. A striped bass hatchery and a steelhead 
hatchery have also been established, making nine 
that the State actually owns, and two others, the 
output of which it furnishes and disposes of. 

The output of our hatcheries is today ten times 
greater than it was ten years ago. Of the general 
excellence of our fish cultural work and artifical pro- 
pagation of fishes, the department at Washington 
pronounces it the best example in the United States, 
and that our salmon work leads the world. All au- 
thorities agree that were it not for the manner in 
which this work is carried on in this State, the Sacra- 
mento and San Joaquin rivers would have long since 
been depleted of salmon, our most valuable and im- 
portant food fish. On the other hand, since the Com- 
mission took up the artifical propagation of these 
food fishes, a steady increase has been shown. The 
season just closed shows the largest run of salmon 
in ten years. Sisson hatchery turns out more young 
salmon than any other single establishment in the 
United States. In 1892 and 1893 the canneries on 
the Sacramento river remained closed because there 
were no salmon. Today California is shipping tons of 
fresh salmon to Oregon and Washington and in car- 
load lots to Chicago, New York and even to Europe. 

For thirty years the State had a very crude man- 
ner of distributing its fish. Today it has one of the 
best equipped fish distributing cars in the United 
States, which was built and equipped at a total 
cost of $7,500. The Federal Fish Commission has 
six cars, the cost of which ranged from $9,000 to 
$11,000 each. 

In 1898 the Commission had one launch to patrol 
a vast area. Today it has three and is building a 
new one at a cost of $5,000 to replace the first one, 
built 12 years ago — all of this being done without 
asking the State for a cent of appropriation. 

It has established and is maintaining a game farm, 
where since February of this year there has been 
raised upwards of a thousand young pheasants. In 
1898 the commission secured an appropriation of 
$1,590 and brought in about 300 pheasants from 
Oregon and China. Next summer we expect to turn 
out at least 5,000 pheasants from the game farm and 
will require no appropriation of the Legislature 
to do it. 

We have also brought into this State from Europe 
upwards of 2,500 Hungarian partridges, which have 
been liberated in 30 counties of the State, and in 
many of them a substantial increase is shown. 

It has imported wild pheasants airect from Europe 
to mingle with the Oregon and Chinese pheasants. It 
has also brought in shipments of wild turkeys from 
the State of Sinaloa, Mexico, and liberated 25 in the 
San Bernardino mountains and placed 22 in the game 
farm and turned out something over 100 of their in- 
crease in the national parks in Tulare and Mariposa 
counties — expending in this work of introduction, 
their care, transportation charges into the State and 
throughout the State, together with the cost of estab- 
lishing the game farm, about $10,000. 

In the past two years the Commission has volun- 
tarily paid out of the hunting license fund a bounty 
of $20 each on 840 mountain lion scalps, killed in 
this State, representing a drain on our resources of 
$17,000 in round numbers. The full value of this is 
better appreciated when it is remembered that the 
experienced mountaineers claim that each lion kills 
from one to three deer each a week; most of them 
claim that two a week is a low estimate. We have 
scores of letters showing where single lions have 
killed as many as five in one week. To be exact, in 
Glenn county in July of this year, one lion was 
known to kill five deer in one week. Taken on the 
lowest estimate given, that a lion kills a deer a week, 
the 840 lion scalps therefore represent 840 deer saved 
in one week to the people of the State; in four 
weeks or a month, about 3,400; in 12 months or a 
year, upwards of 40,000 deer saved, to say nothing 
of the saving of colts, calves, sheep and pigs to stock 
raisers. At the low valuation of $10 on a deer, 
40,000 deer represent a saving to the State of more 
than $400,000. 

In your own county we have paid for the scalps 
of 60 lions; in other words, $1,200 in the past two 
years. We have also paid in salaries and traveling 
expenses to deputies in your county more than $6,000 
in the same time. Yours is one of the best hunting 
and fishing counties in the State, and fish and 
game, when properly understood, are valuable assets. 
To guarantee a continuance? of the supply adequate 
protection is required. 

In answer to the criticism that the Commissioners 
made no financial report, I beg to say that the 
meager printing appropriation of $500 per year wa*» 
speedily exhausted when the hunting license law 
went into effect, which required ten times the amount 
of printing we had ever used before, and an illus- 
trated report in narrative style was not gotten out 
lor the reason that funds were not available for that 
purpose until July, 1909, and the further fact that 
such publication is not required under the law, 
merely "a biennial statement to the Governor of all 
transactions and disbursements, ' therefore only a 
financial statement embodying the recommendations 
of this Commission as to changes in the fish and 
game laws was printed. This was presented to the 
Governor and was placed on the desk of every mem- 
ber of the Senate and Assembly at the recent session 
of the Legislature; it was used by the Ways and 
Means Committee of the House and Finance Com- 



mittee of the Senate when the subject of appropria- 
tions was under discussion. This financial state- 
ment was of the same form and went to the same 
extent as had been the practice lor 20 years. 

The larger report setting forth in narrative form, 
with instructive illustrations, is in progress of com- 
piliation and will be forthcoming. It will carry the 
same financial statement as was submitted to the 
Governor. This will be in the nature of a voluntary 
contribution to the public and will probably number 
5,000 copies, 3,000 being the largest number ever 
printed before. 

A very important fact that is not generally under- 
stood is the necessity that exists for a strong work- 
ing balance at all times. Under the law no State 
property can be insured. There is not a cent of 
insurance carried on our game farm or its build- 
ings, or on any of our nine hatchery buildings or on 
any of our nine hatchery buildings or our boats or 
our fish distributing car — they are all liable to fire. 
Without available funds we would have no means to 
restore or replace any one of them without an ap- 
propriation were it not for the balance that is carried 
ready to meet such emergencies. 

Budding financial geniuses and immature journal- 
ists fall into the grievous error in writing of the 
amount of money that is handled by this Commission, 
as representing one year's expenditure, evidently not 
being aware that it represents a biennial period of 
two years; therefore, however extravagant the state- 
ments, they must always be divided in two. 

As the business of the Commission expanded, re- 
sponsibilities and duties were increased and the 
salaries of many of the employes were advanced to 
approximate the prevailing scale in all well-regulated 
business enterprises, representing similar responsi- 
bilities and duties. It is not generally understood 
that the Commissioners themselves, receive no com- 
pensation, but are allowed traveling expenses. To 
my personal knowledge, covering a period of nearly 
ten years as executive officer, the grand total of 
such charges against the State for all three Commis- 
sioners has not been $300 in a single year. At the 
recent session of the Legislature an effort was made 
by interested politicians to place the Commissioners 
on a salary basis at a compensation of $3,000 per year 
each, or an additional annual drain of $9,000 on our 
funds. The members of this Board opposed the meas- 
ure from the start and it did not become a law. 

With regard to the personnel of the force, it com- 
pares favorably with that of any other institution, or- 
ganized or business concern of the State. As to the 
statement that politics enter into ths work, or in the 
selection of the force, the answer is simple. No 
man was ever employed or lost his position because 
of political affiliations. Employes are selected and 
retain their positions solely because of their in- 
tegrity, qualifications and adaptability to the work. 
Out of a working force of approximately 90 men, I 
cannot name the politics of 10, and I doubt if the 
members of the Board could name the politics of 
more than half that number. 

Another matter not generally understood is the 
fact that not a cent of money can be paid out by the 
Fish Commissioners on any claim until after that 
claim had been approved by the State Board of Ex- 
aminers at Sacramento, which is composed of the 
Governor, the Attorney General and the Secretary 
of State, and then is passed for final auditing by 
the State Controller's department, who, after being 
satisfied that the claims are just charges against the 
State, draws his warrants on the State Treasurer for 
the amount, and the money is thereupon disbursed 
to the respective claimants. Itemized original bills 
showing every cent of expenditures are on file with 
the State Controller's department at Sacramento, 
and duplicates thereof are in the office of the Fish 
Commission and accessible at all times. 

There is much more that could be written and 
more details furnished, as the foregoing indicates, 
but I believe that facts are more interesting than 
figures, which are apt to become tedious; therefore 
this general outline and summing up of the facts in 
concrete form should prove of more general interest. 

Trusting I have not trespassed too far and that 
you will be able to make use of the material, I beg 
to remain, yours respectfully, 

CHARLES A VOGELSANG, Chief Deputy." 
o 

Eastern Brook Trout. — Deputy Game Warden Man- 
deville of Floriston, Nev., recently took to Truckee 
a consignment of Eastern brook trout, measuring 
from four to seven Inches in length. In exchange for 
these fish he received Rainbow trout fry from the 
I he Stale Fish and Game Commission. The; Eastern 
brook trout were placed in streams emptying into 
Donner Lake. 



Good Bear Hunting.— Hear hunting is reported 
good around Truckee, the snow makes It quite easy 
for the hunters to track bruin. Recently two black 
bears were killed, one at the Winnie Smith wood 
camp, weighing 300 pounds, and the other at the old 
Schaeffer camp, fourteen miles southwest of 
Truckee. Other fur-bearing animals are being 
trapped quite plentifully, and the pelts are com- 
manding fair prices in the St. Louis market. 



Reno, Nov., sportsmen held a jackrabbit hunt just 
prior to Christmas. The bag, 200 fat jackrabbits, 
was turned over to the Salvation Army. 



19 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1910. 



COUNTY GAME LAW UPHELD. 

As the Third District Court of Appeals interprets 
it, the constitutional amendment voted in 1902 giving 
the Legislature the right to create game laws of its 
own, did not at the same time deal death to the 
county ordinances then in operation. 

Justice Burnett is the author of an opinion handed 
down last Friday adjudicating the controversy that 
grew out of the supposed conflict. His opinion is 
based on two grounds. First, that the Legislature has 
never taken advantage of the amendment; second, 
that the language of the amendment itself makes it 
clear that exception was made in favor of the county 
ordinances then existing by declaring that they 
should not be repealed. 

The test came on a county ordinance passed by 
Sonoma county in 1899, prohibiting the use of nets 
in any stream, within the county. Ray Cole and 
Joe Ruise resisted punishment for violating the ordi- 
nance on the ground that it had been abrogated 
by the constitutional amendment of 1902. Defeat in 
the upper court means that they must now go to jail 
or pay a heavy fine. 

The decision is of the utmost importance in 
every county and on Monday was the topic of 
conversation among the local hunters and anglers. 

Following this decision the District Attorney of 
Marin county has announced that he will prosecute 
every case brought up for violation of the Marin 
county ordinance that closed the county season on 
anal] December 15th. 

This ordinance had been more honored in the 
breach than in the observance, the validity of the 
county powers being temporarily clouded by ad- 
verse opinion. 

There seems to be some misapprehension in re- 
gard to a supposed precedent established by a 
decision rendered in a case which came before the 
Appellate Court in Southern California. The de- 
cision upset a county ordinance. The joker, how- 
ever, is this, the case did not go on record. The 
law requires a unanimous decision from the bench 
of an Appellate Court. In the case here referred to, 
there was a dissenting and minority decision, hence 
the supposed precendent was clouded in its effect 
as an authority by an incomplete record. 

o 

RECORD STRIPED BASS CAUGHT. 



Striped bass records, both for size and numbers, are 
gradually going up a notch or two as season after 
season passes. For several years the late Fred Bush- 
nell's 29% pounder was the record fish for local 
waters, then one of the anglers came along with 
a 30 or 32 pound bass and for the time being patted 
their individual chests as the record striped bass 
angler. Following these James Thomson's 35 pounder 
caught near Wingo carried the banner. Then rap- 
idly followed about a dozen fish, until Bob Sang- 
ster's or Al Wilson's 44 pound fish were undisputed 
monarchs of the saltwater anglers encomiums. But 
striped bass fishing has proven full of surprises and 
although a dozen or more larger fish were reported 
from time to time as having been caught by the net 
fishermen, still, most of the anglers felt that the 
44 pound mark was pretty near the limit for a local 
rod and line. 

How farfetched this surmise was in shown by 
Chas. R. Bond's capture of a 55 pound striped bass. 
Now the boys are still in the continuous quandary 
class — who is the next lucky rodster for a larger 
one. If the writer is not mistaken, a striped bass 
weighing a bit over 78 pounds caught near New- 
port, R. I., in the '80s has the hallmark stamp for 
largest taken by an Eastern rod and line. 

This striped bass weighed, by Al Wilson and \V. 
R. McFarland, when landed 55 pounds. It was 49% 
inches long — over 4 feet, and measured 38% inches 
in girth, the record striped bass taken with a rod 
and line in any striped bass waters on the Coast to 
date. Possibly a feat that has not been equaled 
for many years past at any Eastern striped bass 
fishing grounds. 

The big fish was taken on December 18th in San 
Antone slough near Burdell's Station, Marin county. 
Bond's favorite fishing ground in the creek lies be- 
tween "Mudhen" slough and "Blind" slough. And here 
it was that the heavy fish was hooked and played up 
and down the creek for forty minutes before being 
gaffed. The clam-baited hook was gorged completely, 
this fact enabling the angler to handle the fish easier 
than if it had been simply hooked in the jaw. The 
big bass practically drowned itself. Bond is a pop- 
ular frequenter of the San Antone fishing resort and 
a member of the Quo Vadis Club, the headquarters 
of which is located on a comfortably fitted up sloop 
anchored in the slough. 

Striped bass anglers are a jolly, enthusiastic lot 
of sportsmen. Albeit there is a keen rivalry among 
the rank and file of the gumbooted piscators jeal- 
ousy however, is a comparatively unknown quality. 
So when the "high hook" laurels for a striped bass 
capture were annexed by Charles R. Bond of Ala- 
meda the fraternity to a man were unstinted in 
praise and congratulations. Now and then the par- 
donable comment was heard from an enthusiast: 
"I'd give |100 if I could have landed that big fellow. 
My, but Bond was lucky." And indeed he was. 

A number of large striped bass have been captured 
by local anglers from time to time that scaled 
over forty pounds. Louis Boutellier has the credit of 
a 42% pound striped bass caught in Russian river, 
below Duncan's Mills. It is safe to say that the 
striped bass anglers will follow the sport now with 
increased application and persistence, every man of 
them eager to lower the 55-pound record. 



San Antone slough so far, has kept in the lead 
for record single fish and total catches. The follow- 
ing accurate statistics compiled by Professor Mc- 
Farland, an expert angler and keen sportsman, since 
the 1st of August, is of much local importance and 
of a nature calculated to make striped bass fishermen 
in other parts of the country open their eyes. 

During the month of August, 23 striped bass were 
taken, the total weight, 140 pounds. The two largest 
weighed 19 and 17 pounds each and were caught on 
a spoon hook. 

In September 50 fish of a total weight of 240 pounds 
was the catch. The four largest scaled 19, 17, 17 and 
15 pounds. 

The October record was nine fish weighing 172% 
pounds all told. The three biggest weighed 44, 
23 and 19% pounds each. 

For November, special scales were in order. Fifty- 
one striped bass weighed 1176 pounds, an average 
of 23 pounds each. 

The December list, up to the 19th inst, chronicles 
12 bass, weight 237% pounds, an average of nearly 
20 pounds each. 

Several individual catches are here given that are 
a creditable showing of angling skill: Al Wilson's 24 
striped bass weighed 446 pounds, an average of 
18 7-8 pounds each. Bob Sangster's eight fish, 221 
pounds, averaging 27% pounds each. Will Hammer's 
mer, six fish, 125 pounds, 25 1-3 pounds average. Man- 
uel Cross, five fish, 116 pounds, 23% pounds average. 
W. R. McFarland, three fish, 99 pounds, 33 pounds av- 
erage. McManus, one fish, forty pounds. Will S. Kittle, 
one fish, 35 pounds. Old man Goodwin, one fish, 32 
pounds. 

The largest fish to date are Bond's 55 pounder, 
Al Wilson's 44%, and Bob Sangster's 44 pound bass. 
The foregoing data gives practically all of the 
reported large fish for the months mentioned. Many 
small bass have been taken by different anglers 
of which no record is obtainable. A 29 pounder 
caught by George Masters is claimed to be the largest 
bass caught last season. Taken all in all, it looks 
as if large striped bass were to be by no means 
rare in the future. 

As striped bass fishing goes, anywhere this gamey 
fish swims, the figures here listed are something 
unusual and will be of interest to salt water anglers 
the world over. 

These fish were all killed by expert anglers, some 
of the hooked bass after towing the boats up and 
down the creek, forced the angler to go ashore and 
handle his finny quarry from the more stable vantage 
of the bank. A battle of an hour and a half's con- 
tinuance has not been an unusual incident in land- 
ing one of the heavy-weights. McFarland's 35 
pounder took out 200 yards of line and dragged his 
boat up the slough for three separate stretches. The 
100 and 150 yard reels in vogue are rapidly being 
changed for 200 yard reels. 

Sunday, December 19th, about ten anglers braved 
the chilly weather and southeast wind at San Antone, 
but not a fish was hooked. The lone big fellow of the 
previous day seemed to exhaust the visible supply 
of striped bass for the time being. Among the eager 
bunch were: Charles Hollywood, Chris Johnson, 
Jack Bliss, Professor McFarland, Dave Wallace, 
Jerry Riley, Al Wilson, Bob Sangster and others. 

Last Sunday and during the mid-week days, 
despite assiduous attention to the sport by quite a 
few anglers, results were practically nil. 

On the levees of the Wingo creeks in Sonoma 
county, a delegation of at least 75 clam tossers wooed 
fickle striped bass fortunes unsuccessfully two weeks 
ago. Probably to sustain the reputation of this fa- 
vorite resort, a "peep" went the rounds that Al Lar- 
son had captured a 9 pound fish — "the old guard, may 
die but never surrenders." However that may be, 
weather and the fish were not en rapport with those 
"on the job." A partial list of the unterrified fish 
tamers is: Charles P. Landresse, Jas. Turner, Will 
Turner, Turret Evans, Al Martin, Jack Stevens, Par- 
son Jackson, H. B. Harte, Timothy Lynch, Otto 
Thiel, Harvey Harmon, Jack Duckell, J. Duckell Jr., 
Jos. Harding and Jos. Gaborino. 

Last Sunday rather a small muster of rods was 
counted at Wingo, almost every angler drew blank, 
the few colors panned out of the sloughs were too 
light for mention. 

Reports from San Pablo, Rodeo, Crockett, Val- 
lejo Junction and other fishing resorts have not been 
encouraging recently. 

o 

STEELHEAD ANGLING. 



Reports from Russian river for over a week past 
are indicative of much sport near Duncan's Mills. 
Ten days ago the fishing began with baited hooks 
but soon gave way to spoon and spinner casting. 

Advices last Thursday were that the rain had not 
affected the fishing to any great extent. The water 
was clear and from ten to fifteen fish was the daily 
catch to the boat. There are boats enough at Dun- 
can's to accommodate a large number of angles. 

The largest fish reported to have been caught was 
a 20 pounder taken by Louis Gotthelf of this city. 
For two weeks past there has been a strong repre- 
sentation of local anglers at Duncan's Mills. 

The river had run down and cleared far sooner 
than was anticipated and was in fine condition for 
angling. The cold weather has prevented the snows 
in the interior ranges from melting fast enough to 
keep the river high and roily. Trout have been in 
evidence daily in numbers. 

Among the anglers who have taken early advan- 
tage of the favorable conditions are: Louis Bou- 
tellier, Dr. J. Auburn Wiborn, Charles F. Breiden- 
stein, Sam Wells, Joseph Pincus, W. J. Street, Dr. 



Abrams, George A. Wentworth, M. J. Geary, George 
W. Ellery and others. The list for today and follow- 
ing days, as long as the fishing lasts, will afford 
material for a comfortable sized angling bluebook. 

Breidenstein and Wells have seined a number 
of choice specimens of steelhead trout. These fish 
are part of the collection of fresh and salt-water 
varieties of fish which will be gathered for stocking 
an aquarium soon to be on public exhibition at the 
Chutes. This taking of game fishes with nets has 
the sanction of and permission of the State Fish and 
Game Commission, there being a provision in the 
statute providing for the taking of trout and other 
fishes for scientific or educational purposes. Chief 
Deputy Commissioner Charles A. Vogelsang has 
been of material aid in making the exhibit a complete 
showing of the many varieties of fish life the State 
officers have fostered and propagated. 

The tidewaters of Paper Mill creek near Point 
Reyes have recently shown a strong revival in steel- 
head possibilities. Two weeks ago a number of nice- 
sized fish were taken, among them a ripe twelve- 
pound steelhead, on Saturday, by Dr. Cavanaugh. 

The Sunday deployment of split bamboo rods was 
a noticeable one. Every point of vantage on the 
banks from the "white house pool" up to the "big 
rock" was pre-empted by a fisherman. Fifty men at 
least were ready to make the fish at home in their 
creels. The trout had a say in this, for rather few 
were caught, weather conditions putting a ban on 
the sport for the day. Among those present (practic- 
ing for Russian river) were S. A. Wells, George Rob- 
erts, Bert Harwood, Dr. H. Abrams, Harry Gosliner, 
Bert Deuare, Joseph Springer, James Lynch, Frank 
Smith, Harry Baker, W. A. L. Miller, James Watt, 
Joseph Meyer, C. F. Breidenstein, William Eaton, 
Drewry Tallant, Frank Dolliver, George Walker, Wil- 
liam Kennedy, Harry Thompson, H. B. Baker, Bill 
Chambers, Joseph I'ri, George l T ri, Milton Franken- 
burg, Cottager Christ and others. 

Further north, in the Salmon Creek lagoon, some 
nine miles from Bodega, George Uhl, Jack Lenimer 
and Ned Bosqui caught a number of fine, large-sized 
steelhead; an eight pounder was the heaviest. The 
angling lun wasc supplemented by quail limits. 

Last Sunday, a number of nice sized steelhead were 
caught in Rodeo lagoon, near Point Bonita. The 
high tides evidently aided the fish in getting over the 
shallow bar. 

At odd times salt water fishermen catch steelhead 
trout. A 12 pound fish was taken recently by an 
angler fishing off the rocks at the Presidio seawall 
for rockcod. 

Steelhead come in through the "Heads" and follow 
the bay waters in search of fresh water streams. 
Time was when the late John Gallagher used to catch 
steelhead from the Webster-street bridge across the 
bay. Salmon grilse have frequently been caught at 
Powell and Mission street wharves, and also from 
the Oakland moles. 

o 

DUCK HUNTING NOTES. 



For a week past duck hunting success has been 
patchy, so to speak. In some sections thin bags 
were the rule, in others again limits were 
generously plenty. Spoonbills were the va- 
riety of webfoots most plentiful in many of the 
inside marsh districts. Along the bay shore re- 
sorts the unsettled weather conditions provided good 
canvasback and bluebill shooting, particularly at the 
east bay shore resorts of San Pablo bay. 

Near Alviso and the drawbridge shooting territory, 
"cans" and "blueys" were plentiful. 

A report from Marin county shooting centers given 
in the San Rafael Independent states: 

The quail shooting in and through the county in 
the past month has been exceedingly good, especially 
on the Country Club grounds and in and around 
Novato and Xicasio. The ducks have been flying 
well and they hug the marshes during the cold morn- 
ings, which makes good sport for the boys on this 
side of the bay. 

In Bolinas bay, a number of good bags have been 
brought in lately. Supervisor Pistolesi returned 
with the limit from his pond near Willow Camp. 

At Tomales Bay a number of the local shooters 
spent last Sunday trying to knock down some of 
the high flying sea brant, but at this game none of 
them were very successful. The bluebills and can- 
vasback ducks however are more plentiful than the 
larger members of the webfooted family and nice 
bags of these two northern species of birds were 
killed. 

Dr. T. P. Bodkin went out at Ignacio for a quail 
shoot and did fairly well. The best luck he had all 
day was on geese. The doctor saw six gray geese 
land in a field a short distance from him, and he care- 
fully made a sneak on them and as he uses 
a sixteen gauge pump gun for shooting, he managed 
to get five out of the six. The birds were slow 
in getting off the ground and the doctor uses a 
pump gun to perfection, consequently he got a goose 
at every shot. 

The quail shooting up through the county has been 
good. George Newman, the president of the Point 
Reyes Sportsmen's Club, says that quail are plentiful 
on the club grounds, although they are a bit wild. 
He managed to get the limit for two days however. 

John Orr, the veteran quail shooter, shot for four 
days at Point Reyes last week and although the 
weather was against the sport and the birds were 
wild he managed to get the limit each day. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January 1, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



THE MEAT SITUATION. 



Secretary Wilson has just finished a 
unique investigation, made for the pur- 
pose of this report, relating to the in- 
crease of wholesale prices of beef when 
sold at retail. The report is interest- 
ing, but not clearly illuminating in 
some particulars. Through employes 
of the Bureau of Animal Industry in- 
quiries were made in fifty cities — large, 
medium and small — in all parts of the 
country. A schedule was prepared to 
record the actual experiences of retail- 
ers in buying and selling a carcass or 
half carcass of beef, and among the 
facts ascertained were the weight and 
wholesale cost of a certain piece of 
beef, usually a half carcass. Then fol- 
lowed the weight and retail price of 
every cut for which a uniform price 
was charged by the retail dealer. Thus 
it became possible not only to com- 
pare high-priced and low-priced cuts, 
but also to compute accurately the re- 
tail price per pound and consumers' 
cost of the beef price for which the 
wholesale price per pound and cost of 
the entire beef had been reported. 

For the fifty cities the total retail 
cost charged to customers above the 
wholesale cost paid by the retailers is 
38 per cent. In five cities the rate of 
increase is 20 per cent or under; in 10 
cities, 21 to 30 per cent; in 12 cities, 31 
to 40 per cent; in 12 cities 41 to 50 per 
cent and in 11 cities, over 50 per cent. 

A gross profit of 40 per cent was 
found in New York City and in Phila- 
delphia; 28 per cent in Buffalo, N. Y.; 
36 per cent in Boston; 17 per cent in 
Baltimore, Md.; 42 per cent in Wash- 
ington, D. C; 46 per cent in Chicago; 
25 per cent in Cincinnati, Ohio; 23 per 
cent in Omaha, Neb.; 28 per cent in 
Kansas City, Mo.; 27 and 35 per cent 
in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn.; 40 
per cent in Milwaukee, Wis., and De- 
troit, Mich.; 39 per cent in St. Louis; 
64 per cent in Mobile, Ala.; 39 per cent 
in San Francisco; 24 per cent in Seat- 
tle, and 37 per cent in Denver, Colo. 

The lower the grade of beef the 
greater the percentag of gross profit. 
In Boston, for illustration, the rate of 
gross profit is nearly twice as great 
for beef costing 8 cents at wholesale 
as for beef costing 11 and 11 V 2 cents. 
Low-priced beef is marked up nearly 
twice as much relatively as high-pried 
beef. In other words, perhaps it is a 
safe inference that the poor people pay 
nearly twice as much profit as the 
well-to-do people pay. 

The ascending prices of meat sug- 
gest inquiry as to whether the prices 
of the farmer's beef cattle and hogs 
have increased at the farm in the 
same degree that meat has to the con- 
sumer. For the purpose of making 
comparisons, the meat price level of 
1896-1900, a period of comparatively 
low prices, is adopted as a base line, 
represented by 100, and for each ani- 
mal and commodity this price level is 
computed. 

The farmer has failed to receive a 
share of higher beef prices with re- 
gard to the raw animal. The price 
levelof two-year-old steers at the farm 
being regarded as 100 for 1896, the 
price of such seers rose to 135.9 in 
1900, declined to 85.5 in 1905, an<i rose 
to 100.8 in 1909, all for the date of 
January 1 and for prices at the farm, 
substantially before corn feeding had 
begun. 

The price of corn in 1909 at the 
farm is represented by 218.6, com- 
pared with 100 for the price level of 
1896-1900, and the price of the best 
native steers in the same year is 139.9, 
which is much above the "Index num- 
ber" for the price of the animal at the 
farm and much below the price of 
corn at the farm. The inference is 
that the farmer gets some return for 
the high-priced corn that he feeds to 
,his steers, but not a return equal to 
60 cents a bushel for his corn, which 
is the price for the last two years. As 
for the unfed steer, it does not partici- 
pate in the upward movement of 
prices in its farm value. 

The wholesale prices of fresh beef 
carcasses have increased in about the 
same degree that the prices of steers 
have at the stock yards, and the retail 
prices of fresh beef have kept pace 
with the wholesale prices. 

The increasing prices of fresh beef, 
therefore, are due to increasing prices 
of animals at the stock yards, and this 
is explained by the abnormal circum- 
stances to which the raising of beef 
animals have been subject in recent 
years. 

There has been a breaking up of 



range herds consequent upon the en- 
forcement of the "no-fence" law by the 
National Government and by encroach- 
ments of the settlers upon the ranges, 
made possible by the practice of "dry 
farming." Not all of the cattle have 
gone directly from the ranges to the 
slaughter houses; a great portion of 
them has gone to the farms for matur- 
ing and finishing, largely upon corn. 
This extra demand on the corn crop is 
reflected in corn prices, which are now 
higher than they have been since the 
records of the Department of Agricul- 
ture began, in 1866, except for 1881. 

Half a dozen years of this abnormal 
movement of beef cattle from ranges 
to the great markets began to tell 
upon the supply in 1908, when the de- 
liveries fell off in a marked degree, 
and the decrease continued in 1909. 

The situation now may be concisely 
summarized in a few lines: (1) The 
production stock of cattle has been 
diminished by range abandonment; 
(2) new demands for corn on farms 
for beef production; (3) high price 
of corn; (4) high prices of all meat, 
partly because of high corn prices; 
(5) the production stock of hogs was 
reduced in 1907; (6) high farm land 
values; (7) both supply and cost of 
meat production unite to raise meat 
prices; (8) for seventy years the pro- 
duction of meat has declined relative 
to population; (9) meat exports in- 
creased until 1906, after which they 
sharply declined; (10) there has been 
a decreasing meat consumption per 
capita; (11) increased per capita con- 
sumption of cereals, vegetables, fruit 
and saccharine foods. — Rural World. 

o 

VALUE OF OIL MEAL IN FEEDING 
CATTLE. 



Linseed meal, as everybody knows, 
is the by-product of the linseed oil 
factory. The flaxseed used in the 
making of linseed oil is crushed and 
subjected to high pressure, which re- 
moves the oil. What remains is lin- 
seed meal. It is an especially valua- 
ble concentrated feed, in that it con- 
tains a high percentage of protein or 
flesh-forming material. At this time, 
when all kinds of stock feeds are ex- 
pensive, linseed meal is of particular 
value. By using it in connection with 
cornmeal, corn fodder or straw, a 
comparatively cheap and useful feed 
is produced. 

The dairymen who supply milk to 
the great cities and also the creamery- 
men are up against it, so to speak, 
this year. They have not been able 
to secure a very considerable advance 
in the price of dairy products, yet all 
kinds of grain and forage are high. 
There isn't any doubt but linseed meal 
can be used effectively. How can this 
be utilized? An effective ration for 
a milch cow in a general way can be 
stated as follows: Suppose a cow 
gives 30 pounds of 5 per cent milk a 
day. A ration consisting of four parts 
oil meal will furnish approximately 
1414 per cent of digestible protein and 
49 per cent digestible carbohydrates. 
If the cow weighs more than 800 
pounds, 15 pounds of mixed hay and 
ten pounds of this concentration 
should maintain a flow of milk and 
keep the cow in first-class condition. 
If the cow weighs 1,000 pounds it will 
require either two pounds more of 
hay or one pound more of the mixture. 
Individually, cows vary so much in 
capacity to make use of feed that 
the dairyman must observe carefully 
and see what effect this ration has 
upon the animal. 

Cows to freshen in the spring can- 
not be expected to give a great amount 
of milk during the winter, consequent- 
ly a camparatively cheap ration can 
be used. A little oil meal should al- 
ways be added every day, so as to 
keep the animal in good condition. 
Bran and cornmeal, equal parts by 
weight, with a pound or so of oil meal, 
will answer very nicely. If the cow 
should show a tendency to give a 
large flow of milk, increase the oil 
meal and the animal will be much 
more profitable. 

A number of rations have been tried 
by dairymen. These vary consider- 
ably and each individual may have to 
make up the feed to suit his own 
conditions. A few of them, however, 
may be suggested, and well worth 
consideration. Cornmeal, two pounds; 
wheat bran, two pounds; malt sprouts, 
three pounds, linseed meal, one 
pound. Wheat bran, four pounds; 
linseed meal, two pounds. Malt 



sprouts, six pounds; wheat middlings, 
four pounds, and linseed meal, two 
pounds. Beef cattle are not the only 
animals to which linseed meal can be 
fed with profit. A small amount added 
to the horse ration is invaluable. Oats, 
of course is the great horse ration. In 
the corn belt, however, corn is one 
of the main grain feeds. This, with 
timothy, does not provide a balanced 
ration, consequently if one pound of 
oil meal per day is added, the ani- 
mals will maintain an excellent condi- 
tion, will be abundantly supplied with 
"ginger," and will have a smooth, at- 
tractive coat. Work horses, in addi- 
tion to a liberal amount of hay, may 
be fed ration as follows: Corn, six 
pounds; wheat bran, five pounds, and 
linseed meal \ l /z pounds. If wheat 
bran is expensive, the following ration 
may be used in connection with ten 
pounds of hay: Cornmeal, five 
pounds; wheat bran, one pound, and 
linseed meal, two pounds. — Drovers' 
Journal. 

WESTERN BEEF FINDS GOOD 
EASTERN MARKET. 

Western beef is coming into its 
own. Not over a decade ago Eastern 
buyers purchased range-bred steers 
only when they were unable to fill 
their feed pens from other sources, 
and usually offered a much lower price 
for this class of stock than they were 
willing to pay for that secured from 
other places. 

Experience has taught these buyers, 
however, that Western range-bred 
steers are usually in the very best of 
health. They have a splendid frame 
upon which to build, are well muscled 
and boned, and being accustomed to 
the rigors of the Western climate, con- 
tinue to put on flesh in the Eastern 
feed pens when cattle from other sec- 
tions, being fed under identical con- 
ditions, are losing flesh on account of 
the inclement weather conditions. 
This Western steer only demands that 
he be given plenty of good fresh water 
and sufficient feed so that he may 
never be hungry and he will always 
give a good account of himself and 
return many dollars in profits to the 
feeder when he is sold for the block 
in the spring. 

These steers shed early under favor- 
able conditions, and when they have 
reached the stockyards they show an 
exterior finish that other cattle, lack 
ing the same health and ruggedness, 
fail to show. This makes the Western 
steers ready sellers on the market, 
and after they have been butchered 
the percentage of the weight of the 
dead carcass over that of other steers 
under the same conditions is so per- 
ceptible as to immediately attract the 
attention of those keen, far-sighted 
men who handle the yard end of the 
business. 

The settlement of the West is rap- 
idly reducing the amount of available 
range and is forcing the cattle to go 
higher and higher into the hills in 
search of forage. This is greatly in- 
creasing the importance of freely util- 
izing the ranges within the national 
forests, and every endeavor is being 
made by the Forest Service to open 
hitherto inaccessible ranges by the 
construction of trails and bridges, and 
unused arid ranges by the develop- 
ment of water. In these higher eleva- 
tions the grass is usually much finer 
in quality and more nutritious, while 
the climate is much more rigorous; 
both of which conditions result in the 
animals being in better health and 
having more solid flesh when placi <1 
on the feeder markets in the fall. Thin 
fall has seen large numbers of the 
range-bred steers, most of which come 
from ranges within national forests, 
topping the feeder markets at all 
points where feeder steers are sold. 

So great has become the demand 
for cattle of the quality mentioned 
that hundreds of stockmen through- 
out the West are culling their bunches 
of stock cattle and are beginning to 
handle steers exclusively. On the old 
ranges where a few years ago one 
was accustomed to see large herds of 
cows and calves, you will find today 
equally large bunches made up entire 
ly of steers, some of which may per- 
haps have come from Old Mexico, 
some from Texas, while Arizona and 
New Mexico usually furnish their 
quota. These steers are brought into 
these Western ranges at from eigh- 
teen months to two years old. They 
become acclimated the first year, while 
in the second and third years they 



become sufficiently mature so that 
they may be taken to market. 

The demand for cattle of this kind 
is greater than the supply, and as In 
all other cases where the demnad is 
greater than the supply the price re- 
ceived on sale must constantly in- 
crease. That this is true of the steer 
business, one can easily ascertain 
through conversation with any one of 
the Western stockmen who make this 
a business. They will tell you that 
they have made more money in the 
last two or three years in handling 
steers than they made in ten years in 
handling strictly stock cattle. 

o 

SUBDIVISIONS OF CUTS OF BEEF. 



A communication from the Ameri- 
can Beef Producers' Association gives 
the following description of the cuts 
of beef: 

Loin — The loin of beef is subdi- 
vided into porterhouse or short cuts, 
T-bone and sirloin. The porterhouse 
consists of the first five or six steaks 
from the small end next to the ribs. 
Next to this comes the T-bone steaks, 
regarded by many as the very choic- 
est part of the loin. The last six or 
eight steaks next to the loin are 
known as the sirloin. The tenderloin 
is the inside portion of lean meat 
near the rib end of the loin. As a 
rule, the tenderloin is only cut from 
the cheaper carcasses and the balance 
of the loin is used for canning in 
such cases. Where the tenderloin is 
cut from the choice carcass, a fancy 
price is charged for it, as it seriously 
injures the value of the rest of the 
loin. 

Round and Rump — The rump is the 
fleshy portion over the thigh. After 
it is cut off, the round extends on 
clown to the shank, having only one 
bone near the center. 

Flank — A section of lean meat over 
lies the flank which is stripped off 
and is known as the flank steak, and 
is much sought after. The balance 
of the flank is mostly used for sau- 
savige and hamburger, but can be 
boiled. 

Ribs — This section consists of the 
first seven ribs and is mostly used 
for roasts. The cuts nearest the loin 
are considered the choicest and sell 
for the most money. Next to the 
chuck the meat is deeper and rather 
coarser. 

Chuck — The lower eight or ten 
inches of that portion marked chuck 
is known to the trade as the "clod." 
This lies just above the brisket and 
extends up to the lower portion of 
the neck. This is cut mostly for pot 
roasts and contains much lean meat. 
Most of the chuck is cut into steaks, 
the best portions being on the end 
nearest the ribs. The portion next 
to the neck usually sells for pot roast 
or boiling. 

Plate — The plate is the lower por- 
tion of the carcass below the ribs, 
taking in the covering of the belly. 
It is mostly used for boiling, but con- 
tains some good meat. 

Brisket — This takes in the portion 
between the shank and the clod, or 
lower part of the chuck. It is a very 
fleshy piece with some heavy bone, 
but makes fine pot roast or boiling 
meat. 

Shank -That portion of the shank 
from the knee or heel, to the cut 
above, is fleshy, though coarse, and is 
mostly used for boiling. The lower 
part is mostly bone and sinew and 
is for soup and boiling. In the fore- 
legs this is called the shin. 

Neck — This part usually sells with 
a part of the chuck and Is fit mostly 
for boiling. It is fleshy, but coarse. 

Sirloin Ends — In some markets the 
ends of the sirloin and T-bone steaks, 
which run down into the flank, are 
cut off at the point where the flesh 
widens and are sold separately. These 
ends are cheaper than the loin meat, 
tint properly cooked are as good as 
any part of the animal. 



The transportation of meat lrom the 
Argentine to England is expected to 
increase in volume with the building 
of nine new steamers by a syndicate 
lately formed for that purpose. The 
amount of chilled beef sent from the 
Argentine to England has been more 
than doubled in the last five years and 
the trade in mutton is also increasing. 
The new line of steamers of the latest 
type and highest speed will stimulate 
the traffic. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1910. 




PELLAGRA IN THE HORSE. 



Tin' story of pellagra, by Marion Ham- 
ilton Carter, in McClure's Magazine, last 
month, lias caused the American people 
to sit up and take notice. The following 
quotation, like Lincoln's rat hole in the 
corner, will bear looking into: 

"The ho|>e of the American situation 
lies in the Pure Food law and the horse. 
At the first pellagra conference, Doctor 
Powers pointed out that pellagra and 
'blind staggers' in horses are probably 
one and the same, and Doctor Wood sug- 
gested that we may actually have at 
hand all the ready-made serum that we 
need." 

Space will not permit of a general dis- 
cussion of the subject, but here are a few 
pertinent facts in connection with this 
comparatively new and unexplored field 
of scientific research. For many years, 
at least, corn has been considered a dan- 
gerous food for the horse. It has killed 
many times more horses from colic than 
all other foods combined. Again, there 
is a disease in cattle known as "corn 
stock disease,'' which, like pellagra, has 
defied every effort to determine its cause. 
This is a disease of cattle and attacks 
them only during the winter months 
when they have fed on corn stalks in the 
fields. 

Now, on the other side of the proposi- 
tion, we must note this: The blind 
staggers of the horse from eating corn is 
in no way different from that produced 
from any other food, save in its fre- 
quency and severity of attack. The 
symptoms are not thoso characteristic of 
toxemia and certainly have no resemb- 
lance to the symptoms descrilied as being 
peculiar to the nervous type of pellagra. 
It is difficult to see how this condition 
of the horse can be considered in any 
other light than a flatulent colic with 
more or less rerlex brain disturbance. 
Pellagra is essentially a chronic condi- 
tion; while blind staggers is always 
acute, and if deatli does not take place 
within two or three days, the animal 
goes on to complete recovery. This con- 
dition of the horse is not always asso- 
ciated with the feeding of corn that has 
been heated or handled in such a way as 
to make the presence of toxic substances 
probable. It certainly requires an ex- 
treme and unwarranted stretch of the 
imagination to see any relation of blind 
staggers to pellagra. 

There is a condition of poisoning from 
eating mouldy corn stalks that in the 
horse is just a little more worthy of con- 
sideration in this connection. Rut even 
here there is never a chronic condition 
following with special skin, intestinal, or 
nervous symptoms. 

We are unable to discover at this time 
upon what grounds the author of the ar- 
ticle in "McClure's Magazine," or Doc- 
tor Wood assumed that the horse is sub- 
ject to pellagra. 

GEO. H. GLOVER, 
Colorado Agricultural College, Fort Col- 
lins. 

o 

AN EASTERN FARMER'S IDEAS. 

A fanner from Maine that lias been 
visiting California thus writes to 
Hoard's Dairyman his views of the sit- 
uation here in 1909: 

We are having a very fine season 
here on the Coast. There have been a 
few frosty mornings, but for the most 
part the weather has been warm with 
gentle rains intervening. The hills 
and valleys are looking green with 
fresh grass, and they will continue to 
get greener until next April, when the 
rains will slack off and the dry season 
approach gradually. Yet, with a good 
hay crop and all this freshly springing 
grass, the price of butter keeps up and 



we are now paying from 40 to 45 
cents per pound for creamery butter. 

Evidently there is room for many 
more dairy herds here In California, 
by the way dairy products keep up, 
and the term is used in more than one 
sense — there is room for the herds on 
the ranges and for the products in the 
markets. Still there are enough 
farmers in the State to produce all 
the milk and butter we need, if they 
would only do it. The trouble is that 
just as quick as a farmer comes here, 
he wants to become a fancy farmer. 

Only last week I went up to Santa 
Rosa through the Sonoma Valley and 
could see how things were done. Two 
leading industries were grape growing 
and hop raising, the product in one in- 
stance going largely into wine making 
and the other into brewing. 

Grapes are so cheap here in Cali- 
fornia that they would not pay for the 
picking, and I saw more than one vine- 
yard while on my recent journey where 
the grapes were still on the vines, 
hanging in great black clusters. In 
other instances grapes have been fed 
to hogs by the ton. 

Hops are a fair price this year, but 
this follows two lean years I am told. 
So you see there is plenty of stuff 
raised with which to manufacture 
booze, but not enough for butter. 

Well, perhaps the California farmers 
will get wise after a while and do 



OVERLAND 
LIMITED 



CROSSES 

HIGH SIERRA 
GREAT SALT LAKE 

by daylight 

Chicago in 3 Days 

Electric lighted — Fast Flying Cross-Coun- 
try Train — Luxuriously Equipped. Pull- 
man Drawing Room, Stateroom, Vesti- 
buled Sleeping Cars. 

Careful and attentive dining service. 
Parlor Observation Car with Library and 
Cafe, Ladies' Reading Room, Gentle- 
men's Smoking Room. 

Daily News Bulletins, Latest Papers and 
Magazines. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 




lubricates the mechanism, prevents rust 
on the metal paits ami cleans and 
polishes the stock. For cleaning out the 
residue of burnt powder, especially 
smokeless powder, it is unequaled. 

3-ln-One Oil Co., 
102 New St., New York, N. Y. 



FOR SALE 

Nearest 2:22V 

Sire of 

Highfly 2:0434, Alone 2:09,, 
Trueheart 2:19 ] ,, Joe Gans 2:19 , 
Just It (3-year-old) 2:19)£, 
and brother to John A. McKerron 2:04% second 
fastest stallion In the world. 

Nearest is 15% hands high, weight UN pounds. 
This horse is a sure foal getter and Is in splendid 
condition. 

Address. MRS. S. V. BARSTOW. 

1042 Alameda Ave.. San Jose. CM. 



STALLION FOR SALE. 

DEL GAKTHKO by Diablo, dam by Election- 
eer, he by Electioneer, etc. 
For further partif ulars address, 

JAMES R. BLACK. 

Arbuckle, Colusa Co.. Cal. 

FOR SALE OR TRADE. 

A very handsome bay mare, 16 hands, 
seven years old, sired by Moses S. ; tirst 
dam mare by Hawthorne. She has won- 
derful stamina and has trotted quarters 
in :i:i seconds, although never trained or 
given a record. She Is a fine road mare, 
with perfect action. 

Price $300, or will trade for a sorrel 
16.2, not over seven years old, that will 
make a four-horse leader. 

Apply for two weeks at Perry's Sta- 
bles, Napa, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

Black gelding, foaled 1904, by Aptos 
Wilkes (trial 2:16) dam Chloe 2:24 by 
I'exter Prince. Well broke to drive 
single and double and to saddle. Is 
handsome and has some speed. Is a 
very desirable road horse and the price 
asked for him is very low, considering 
his qualifications. Address Mr. Cnll- 
fonin. Nevada Stable*, San Rafael, 
where horse can be seen. 



FOR SALE. 

Andy Carnegie 2:16V4 by Jersey 
Wilkes, by George Wilkes, first dam 
Daisy F. by Commander, the dam of 2 
in the 2:20 list. He Is a handsome and 
stylish bay gelding, sixteen hands high; 
weighs 1150 pounds; perfectly sound; 
drives single or double; good under 
saddle, and can step in 2:12. He is a 
fine prospect. This horse had been do- 
ing heavy work on a ranch until last 
year; since that time, with compara- 
tively little training, he won the only 
race in which he was entered in three 
straight heats. For further informa- 
tion, write G. W. HONNELL, Itedlands, 
Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

ZWILKA by Zombro 2:11; lirst dam Marjory 
Maw by Flaco: second dam Jessie Leonard by 
Billy Wilks 2:2'J!ii: third dam Maria Ensign by 
Ensign 2:2X%; fourth dam Maria Hums by Robt. 
Bonner, by Hamb. 10. She is 7 years old. sound 
in every way. city broke and a lady can drive 
her. She is the dam of two colts, one a yearling 
and the other a '-'-year-old that took a record of 
2:25. the third heat of a colt stake at the State 
Fair at Sacramento in 1909; At Stockton on Ad- 
mission day. racing against aged horses, he was 
beaten the third heat in 2:20)4. This will show 
that she would make anyone a driving horse and 
one could raise from her a good colt every year. 
I was offered more for her when she was a 2-year- 
old than I am asking for her at the present time. 

For further particulars write 
Box 173. HOWARD D. KERR. Sacramento, Cal. 



FOR LEASE. 

KINNEY ROSE :i:13%, by McKluney 
2:1114, dam Golden Rose by Falrose; 
second dam Lady Harper by Alaska; 
third dam by Algona; fourth dam by 
Oddfellow, etc. Handsome dark bay 
stallion, stands 15.3 hands and weighs 
over 1200 pounds. A splendid horse in 
every respect, handsome, intelligent, 
good disposition and gives promise of 
being one of the fastest trotting sons 
of the great McKlnney. His get, the 
oldest of which are two years old, 
all show great speed and are fine indi- 
viduals. Kinney Rose will be leased 
for the breeding and racing season of 
1910 to a responsible party. 

For particulars call on or address 
CHRIS HASH AGEN , 
2801 tllnt St., Sao Francisco. 



CHESTNUT TOM 434KS FOR SALE. 

1 want to sell my stallion Chestnut 
Tom 2:15, as I am now engaged in busi- 
ness and cannot give him my attention. 
He is by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16'^, sire of 
JoTin A. McKerron 2:04%, the fastest 
trotting stallion in America, and of 
Copa de Oro 2:6l'4, the fastest pacing 
heat winner of 1909. His dam, Jieta 
Carter, is by Director 2:17, and his 
grandam Lida W. 2:18% is by Nut- 
wood 2:18%, and is the dam of four in 
the list. Chestnut Tom is the sire of 
Louise Carter, three-year-old record 
2:24, the only one of his get ever 
trained. Chestnut Tom was foaled in 
1898, is a very strong and vigorous 
horse, and will be a sure sire of speed 
if given an opportunity. 

For price and further particulars, ad- 
dress »;eo. t. algeo, 

3S04 Piedmont Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

Roan gelding, trotter, four years old. 
15.3, sired by Antrim, first dam Myrtle, 
second dam India, third dam Kate Ben- 
jamin, fourth dam Rose by Rattler. 
Trained 10 weeks last spring, trotted a 
mile in 2:17%, last half in 1:04V4, last 
quarter in 32 seconds. A sure 2:10 
trotter for next year. 

Bay Ally, black points, five years old, 
15.2. Natural pacer. Sired by Antrim, 
sire of Anzella 2:06% , first dam Daisie 
Ronan, second dam Black Midget, third 
dam Morg. Was worked 10 weeks last 
spring; she paced a mile in 2:15%, last 
half in 1:03%, last quarter in 30% sec- 
onds. 

Both these horses are good gaited, 
level headed and game, wear nothing 
but the harness, and absolutely sound. 
If you want green racing material, these 
can show you speed at any time. 

J. JOHNSTON, 
1120 Dccriim Avenue, Melrose, Cal. 



Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the beat of profes- 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. Complicated case* treated suc- 
cessfully. CalU from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

The best work at reasonable prices 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL. 

620 Ootavla St., between Fulton and Grove. 
Phone Special 2074. San Praneiaoo, Cal. 

GLIDE BROTHERS 

Successors to J. 11. Glide & Sons. 
Sole Proprietors of the 
FAMOUS BLACOW-ROBERTS-CLIDE 
FRENCH MERINO SHEEP. 

Glide Grade — 7-8 French and 1-8 Spanish Merino 
— Thoroughbred Shropshire Rams*- 
Rams for sale at all times. 
P. O. Box 215. Telephone and telegraph. 
Dixon. Cal. Address, Dixon, Cal. 

H. E. BECK WORTH. 

Fesserton. Ontario. ( a nada. 

Breeder and Exhibitor of Scotcn (tellies. Sil- 
ver Penciled Wyandottes. Pouter it Homing pig- 
eons of the very best blood; a fine 101 of dog 
puppies on hand, beautifully marued. Will 
make prize winners, no better oreeuing in 
America. Can send pedigree GO years Dack. 



PEDIGREED FOX HOUNDS. 

AH guaranteed, broke dogs and duds. 400 red 
fox cubs. Price list. 

J. D. STODGIIILL. Sheloyvllle Ky. 



GOOD FISHING 

and pleasure boating on the Mann snore at 
Tiburon and vicinity. Fishing Tackle to let and 
Rait always on hand. First-class boats at reas- 
onable prices. 

San Francisco Boat Mouse, 

Capt. F. Wat. Kiirke. Prop.. Tiburon. Cal. 
Good ferry service from foot of Market St.. 



Blake, Moffit & Towne 

Dealers in PAPER 

1400-1450 4th St., San Franciaco. Cal. 

Blake. Moflk sY Towne. Los Angelas. 
Blake. McFall & Co.. Portlana. Ore. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY, 

High-Class Art in 
HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 
Artiatic Designing 
141 Valencia St., San Franciaco 

RUBEROID ROOFING. 

Weather Proof. Acid Proof, Fire Resisting. 
BONESTELL & CO. 
118 to 124 First St., San Francisco. Cal. 



MQ?P: 



SEND 

FOR 

Our New 



CATALOG 

Beautifully Illustrated -- FREE 



C. C. MORSE & CO. 

Seeds - Plants - Trees 
57 Jackson St. San Francisco 



THICK, SWOLLEN G LANDS 

that make a horse Wheeze, 
Roar, have Thick Wind, or 
Choke-down, can be re- 
moved with 




or uny Bnnch or Swelling . 
No blister, no hairl 
gone, and horse kepi atj 
work. $2.00 per bottle, de 
Ilvered. Book 3 D free. 

ABSOKBINE, JK., for 
mankind. $1.00, delivered. Reduces Goitre, Tumors, 
Wens, Varicose Veins, Ulcers, Hydrocele, Varies- 
Cele. Book free Made only by 
W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 54 Temple St, Springfield, Mas*, 

For Sale by— Langley 4 Michaels, Ban Fran- 
cisco, Cal.: Woodward, Clark & Oo., Portland, 
Ore. ; F. w. Braun Co., Los Angeles, Cal. ; 
Western Whoseaale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal. ; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cal. ; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drag Co., Spokane, Wash 



Saturday, January 1, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



18 



things in a more safe and sane way. 
All through the Sonoma Valley I saw 
thousands of acres of fine land lying 
fallow, land that looked mighty good 
to the eyes of an old Maine farmer. 
Even from the car window I could see 
that the soil was fine, there being 
abundant bottom land with rolling 
sandy and clay loam on the uplands. 

Now I know this land would produce 
the finest kind of corn, potatoes, 
wheat; in fact, all the regular lines 
of farm crops if it were only to be 
cultivated and cultivated properly. 
And this means that it would make a 
fine dairy country were the proper ef- 
forts to be put forth to produce feed. 

It would need no irrigation for one 
or two crops per year because the rain- 
fall is heavy during the wet season, 
which is a long one. 

The bottom lands I know would pro- 
duce good alfalfa, and in the Santa 
Rosa Chamber of Commerce room I 
saw some fine specimens of corn, the 
stalks being more than eight feet 
high; in fact, the samples looked as 
if they might have been plucked from 
a Kansas or Nebraska cornfield. 

Think of the amount of good rich 
corn fodder that could be produced 
from that land, provided there was a 
lot of dairy cows on the place to con- 
sume the stuff and in turn furnish 
the fertilizing material with which to 
keep the land up to the standard. 
Here again, pork and potatoes are 
high here in California, and it is sel- 
dom that they are not, and what a 
business could be done in those lines 
on that very land. 

But we have cheap fruit, cheap 
wine, etc., here, but always high food- 
stuffs such as wheat, potatoes, pork, 
milk, butter and the time is ripe for 
the small, all-around, general farmer. 
o 

Discussing the wool market last 
week's American Wool and Cotton 
Reporter said: If there has been a dif- 
ference of opinion in the very recent 
past regarding the probable outcome 
of the contest between dealers and 
consumers, there is little room for any 
further doubt that the markets of the 
world are pretty firmly established 
upon the basis of ruling quotations, 
assuming, of course, that the wool 
upon which the price basis is fixed 
is the standard of whatever grade it 
may be. Dealers cannot buy in this 
country or abroad the best qualities 
of wool much, if any, below quoted 
prices, and the cases are rare where 
they are selling these same standard 
grades at a price varying much from 
our range of quotations. To be sure 
odd lots of several different grades 
have sold under quotations quite re- 
cently, and the buyers have not been 
overcareful to hide the fact that such 
purchases have been made, but the ef- 
fect is not what is desired, as investi- 
gation shows that there was some- 
thing about the quality or quantity 
that made it just about the value of 
the reduced price. It may have been 
the last lot in a warehouse, or it may 
have been an extra heavy wool that 
was slow moving, and not as valuab'e 
as the money it would bring, at about 
this time, and, so far as we can learn, 
It is the exception rather than the 
rule, where any real choice lot of wool 
has sold under the market, without 
some specific cause that could not be 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN 
Society (The German Bank), (Member 
of the Associated Savings Banks of 
San Francisco), 52fi California street; 
Mission Branch, 2. r >72 Mission street, 
near Twenty-second; Richmond Dis- 
trict Branch, 432 Clement street, be- 
tween Fifth and Sixth avenues. 

For the half year ending December 
81, 1909, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent per an- 
num on all deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Monday, January 3, 
1910. Dividends not called for are 
added to the deposit account and earn 
dividends from January 1, 1910. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



THE SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 
(Member of the Associated Savings 
Banks of San Francisco), 101 Montgom- 
ery street, corner Sutter street. 

For the half year ending December 
31, 1909, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent per 
annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday, January 
3, 1910. Dividends not drawn become 
a part of the deposit accounts and earn 
dividends at the same rate from Janu- 
ary 1st. Money deposited on or before 
January 10th will earn interest from 
January 1st. 

WM. A. BOSTON, Cashier. 



applied to the market in general. On 
the other hand there is considerable of 
an optimistic feeling in the trade and 
hopes are high that very soon after 
the opening of the new year there will 
be a period of activity, and the admis- 
sion of a number of large consumers 
and a great many smaller ones that 
they must have wool after the new 
year opens encourages the belief that 
an active trade is not far away. Texas 
wools have been particularly active 
during the week with sales of about 
650,000 fall wool at 21c and 23c, to 
cost 60c and 62c cleaned. One lot of 
200,000 pounds fall sold at p. t. and 
22 V 2 c and 23c was paid for one good- 
sized lot. 



- T\P Registered Trade Mark 

^ SPAVIN CURE 

As they As "Save-the-Horse" 

sometimes are can make them 



SOUND 





BARTLETT HOUSE TRAINING 

STABLES. 

PATCHOGUE, N. Y., Dec. 2, 1909. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y. : 

Gentlemen: I have used your "Save- 
the-Horse" to good advantage. In one 
instance I used it on a valuable mare 
having very badly enlarged ankle joints 
(front ankles) and the results were 
even better than I had dared hope for. 
This mare was so crippled that it was 
almost impossible for her to travel at 
all, but after using your "Save-the- 
Horse" she came out of it as good as a 
newly milled dollar. She has done a lot 
of hard work on the road since that 
time and hasn't shown any signs of the 
old trouble. I cannot speak too highly 
in favor of your preparation. I keep 
it on hand and use it whenever possi- 
ble. Sincerely yours, 

FRANK L. LOPER. 



S. C. BURPEE. 

Shipping Points: Lagrange, Ga.; 
Roanoke, Aia. 
GLENN, Ga., Nov. 5, 1909. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y.: 

Dear Sirs: I purchased a bottle of 
"Save-the-Horse" from you for a spavin 
and found it to be great stuff. Send me 
another bottle by express to Standing 
Rock, Ala. Yours respectfully, 

S. C. BURPEE. 

"Save-the-Horse" permanently cures 
bone and bog spavin, ringbone (except 
low ringbone), curb, thoroughpin. splint, 
"hoe boil, windpuff, injured tendons, 
and all lameness, without scar or loss 
of hair. Horse may work as usual. 
Send for copy and booklet. 

per bottle, witli a written guaran- 
tee as binding to protect you as the 
best legal talent could make it. 
\t Drugsrists ii nil Dealers or Express 
Paid. 

TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
D. E. Newell, 
.-.IS Biijo Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 
I10« Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Never Shoot Loose 

A .Smith Gun never shoots loose, and is so 
guaranteed— even with nitro powder. The 
bolting mechanism takes up the wear so that 
the longer you shoot Smith (inns the tighter 
they get. 

Smith guns; 

HUNTER ONE— TRIGGER 

are the only one-trigger guns that do not balk 
or double. They increase the efficiency of 
the second barrel fully 50 per cent. 

The very latest is the 20-gauge Smith Gun, 
weight hVi to 7 lbs., and a little beauty. 

Smith guns are sold by all dealers. Send 
for handsome catalogue In colors. 




THE HUNTER ARMS CO., 

92 Hubbard Street. Fulton, N. Y 



GombauWs 

Caustic Balsam 

The Worlds Greatest and Surest 

V$ Veterinary Remedy fn 

HAS IMITATORS BUT NO COMPETITORS I 



SAFE, SPEEDY AND POSITIVE. 

Supersedes All Cautery or Fir- 
ing. Invaluable as a CURE for 

FOUNDER, 

WIND PUFFS, 

THRUSH, 

DIPHTHERIA, 

SKIN DISEASES, 

RINGBONE, 

PINK EYE, 

SWEENY, 

BONY TUMORS, 

LAMENESS FROM 

SPAVIN, 

QUARTER CRACKS, 
SCRATCHES, 
POLL EVIL. 
PARASITES. 
REMOVES 
BUNCHES or 
BLEMISHES, 
SPLINTS. 
CAPPED HOCK, 
STRAINED TENDONS. 

SAFE FOR ANYONE TO USE. 



We pfnarantee that ono tnWespoonful of Cauetlo 
Balsam will produce more actual results than a whole 
bottle of any liniment op spavin mixture ever made 
Every bottle sold in warranted to givo satisfaction 
Wi lte for testimonials showing whnt the most promt 
nent horsemen say of It. 1'riOP, fill. 50 per bottle. 
Sold by druggists* or sent by express, charges paid, 
wuh i . i- directions for Its use. 

The Accented Standard 
VETERINANY REMEDY 

Always Reliablem 

Sure In Results. 




Sole /awontm ^Proprietors iar t/ie I „ 

^u.S.& CANADAS. i CLEVELAND, 



NOTTIING T?rT GOOD T?FSUI,TS' 

Haveused GOMBAUWS CAUSTIC BALSAM for more 
|than 20 years. It is tho bopt Mister I have er tried I have 
■ft it in hundreds of cases nith best result.. It is T er- 
l«.f .7 lfef " r * 1 ">," l "=tin"P"ieneed person to U se ThU 

Ift Che largest breeding establishment o« trotting hone, in 
I the wot id .and use your blister often. -W. II. HAYJIOND, 
|Irop. Belmont l ark Stock lorro, Belmont Park, Mont 



CSTSD 10 YKATt<5 SFrrTSSFtTt.T.Y. 

Ihavoused GOMRAVI.T'S CAUSTIC BALSAM for U_ 
I years : have been very sureessful in curing curb .ringbone, 
| carped hock and knee, bad ankles, rheumatism, and al- 

steverycauseoflamenessinhor.es Have aatahleof I 
I forty head, mostly track and speedway horse., and eer- 
Itainly can recommend it— C C. CRAMKB, Training 
I Stables. 930 Jennings Street, New York City. 



Sole Agents for the United States and Canada. 

The Lawrence- Williams Co. 

TORONTO, ONT. CLEVELAND, OHIO. 



Race Course: Sheepshead Bay, N. Y. 



Office: 571 Fifth Ave., N. Y. 



The Coney Island Jockey Club 

Events to Close Monday, January 3, 1910. 

FOR THE JUNE MEETING, 1910. 



FOR THREE-YEAR-OLDS AND UPWARDS. 

THE SUBURBAN— Value $6,000 One Mile and a Quarter 

THE COMMON WEALTH— Value $3,000 One Mile and a Quarter 

THE ADVANCE — Value $3,000 One Mile and Five-Sixteenths 

THE CONEY ISLAND HAN DICAP— Value $2,000 Six Furlongs 

THE SHEEPSHEAD BAY HAN DICA P— Value $2,000 One Mile 

THE LONG ISLAND HANDICAP— Value $2,000 One Mile and a Furlong 

THE GRASS SE LLI NG— Value $1,500 One Mile and a Sixteenth 

FOR THREE YEARS OLD (FOALS OF 1907). 

THE TIDAL — Value $2,000 One Mile and a Quarter 

THE CONEY ISLAND JOCKEY CLUB STAKES— Value $3,000 

One Mile and a Half 

THE SWIFT— Value $2,000 Seven Furlongs 

THE MERMAID (For Fillies)— Value $2,000 One Mile 

FOR TWO YEARS OLD (FOALS OF 1908). 

THE GREAT TRIAL— Value $10,000 Six Furlongs 

THE DOUBLE EVENT— Value $8,000 

First Event Five and a Half Furlongs. Second Event Six Furlongs 

THE FOAM— Value $2,000 Five Furlongs 

THE SURF — Value $2,000 Five and a Half Furlongs 

THE VERNAL— Value $2,000 Five Furlongs 

THE DAISY— Value $1,500 Five Furlongs 

THE PANSY— Value $1,500 Six Furlongs 

FOR THE AUTUMN MEETING, 1912. 

THE FUTURITY— $5,000 Added (Estimated value $30,000). For the 

produce of mares covered in 1909 Six Furlongs 



The Coney Island Jot-key Club reserves the right to cancel any or all of the 
above events without notice at any lime prior to the actual running thereof, 
without liability, except for the return of the entrance money. 

For entry blanks, address 

THE < om:\ ISLAND .mm ki:v CLUB, 

571 Fifth Avfiiuc, \<« York CUy. 



Take the Breeder and Sportsman. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1910. 



DISTILLED 



if e r n I o c 

tM^-NAME REGISTERED PATENTED, APRIL 21 ?T 1908- 



EXTRACT 




Largest money winner in the world outside of Grand Circuit 



DAYBREAK 



"It's a great body 
wash and liniment. 
T. F. McGi'iitE. 




" I think it a per- 
fect leg wash and lo- 
tion. 

E. F. Grams." 



FERNLOC is Nature's Greatest Body Wash and Liniment. 
Contains 20 per cent. Grain Alcohol. 



It always 

Increases Speed, Stimulates 
and Strengthens, Producing 
Staying Qualities. 



It always 

Induces a Healthy Circulation. 
Prevents Congestion, Chills and 
Colds. 



It always removes Soreness, Rheumatism, Inflammation and Stiffness from muscles 

and tendons. 



FERNLOC does not Stain or Blister. It produces a Smooth, Healthy. Skin and Hair. 
"YOr CANNOT I SK IT WRONG." 



One Gal. Jugs, $3. Five Gal. Jugs, $10. Half Iiarrel and liarrels. $1.50 per Gal. 
Ask for books and circulars giving full information and directions. 



nr. \ i i-'.ks \vni> si:i.i, ri:nM,nf, 

J. (i. Head & Droit Ogden, Utah 

Jenkins A. Bro Salt Lake City, Utah 

B. II. Irish Butte, Mont. 

O. It. Neatoa Spokane, Wash'. 

Hoaka Haraeaa C<> Tncoana, Wash. 

T. H. Henderson Seattle. Wash. 

Keller Harness Co Portland, Ore. 

Hi II. Hards Saddlery Co Marynville, Cal. 

It. Gram roller Sacramento, Cal. 

W. B. Detela Pleasanton, Cal. 

J. V. I.etrlN Denver, Colo. 

W. .1. Keaney San Pranclsco, Cal. 

Manufactured by 

THE FORESTINE COMPANY, 

Williamsport, Pa. 



FINE PROSPECTS FOR HORSE 
BREEDERS. 



When a breeder and dealer who is 
first and foremost essentially a farmer 
can afford to give ten thousand dollars 
for a draft stallion, as was the case at 
the Chicago Fat Stock Show last 
week, says the Kentucky Stock Farm, 
with the expectation of having not 
only a safe but profitable investment, 
it certainly seems assured that better 
times for horse breeders are to be 
seen forthwith than have ever been 
known in this country, and it is a mat- 
ter for genuine felicitation to find that 
there exists in the heavy horse busi- 
ness the same promise of prosperity 
that has been so significantly indi- 
cated in the speed horse market and 
which received such a splendid con- 
firmation through the medium of the 
recent public sale in New York. 

Among the saddle horses, too, are in- 
dications of very strong demand and 



upward tendency of prices, a three- 
year-old filly having been reported sold 
within the last few days at a price 
of thirty-two hundred dollars, and a 
stallion, which last summer com 
manded six thousand dollars, is re- 
ported to have been re-sold within the 
past few days at an advance of one 
thousand dollars. Look in what direc- 
tion we will, we see everywhere and 
upon every hand the same conditions 
indicated, and the growth of this ten- 
dency has been so steady and grad- 
ual that it indicates a healthy condi- 
tion and has nothing whatever of 
those conditions which often prove a 
veritable boomerang which always at- 
tend the sudden inflation of values 
and of fictitious and unwarranted 
prices. The horse business is better 
today and more potent in its promise 
than it has been for many years, and 
not even the most unreasoning and 
unreasonable pessimist can find in the 
present outlook anything whereof he 
can make excuse to hand his lamenta- 
tions. 



The Time and the Place to Sell 
STANDARD-BRED 

Trotters and Pacers 



IS DURING 



THE FIRST WEEK IN MARCH, 1910, 

AT THE 

Third Annual Pleasanton Sale 



FRED H. CHASE & CO., Auctioneers. 



47S Valencia St., San Francisco. 



The best opportunity horse owners will have to dispose of their horses at the 
very highest prices. Every facility afforded owners to properly present the merits of 
their resi>ective horses to the public. It will be the best advertised of all sales and 
buyers from all parts of the Pacific Coast will be there to make their selections. 
Consignors to the sale last year at this famous track were mote than pleased with 
the results obtained, and in March we will have as fine a lot to select from as were 
ever led before an auctioneer. Send for entry blanks at once. Remember, all en- 
tries will close February l()th. No later! 

If you have a good one and want to sell for the highest price remember this is 
your best opportunity! 

Good horses bring big prices at Pleasanton. 




Awarded Gold Medal at California State Fair, 1892. Every horse owner 
who values his stock should constantly have a supply of it on hand. It Improves 
and keeps stock in the pink of condition. Ask your grocers or dealers for It. 
Positively cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. Manhattan Food Co., C. P. 
Kertel. Pres., 1001-1003 E. 14th St., Oakland. Cal. 



STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

OCCIDENT STAKE OF 1912 



Trotting Stake for Foals of 1909. 

Entries close January 1, 1910. 

To be trotted at the California State Fair of 1912. Entries to close January 
1, 1910, with J. A. Filcher, Secretary, at the office in Sacramento. One hundred 
dollars entrance, of which $10 mvist accompany nomination; $15 to he paid Janu- 
ary 1, 1911, $-5 to be paid January 1, 1912, and $50 thirty days before the race. 
The Occident Cup, of the value of $400, to be added by the Society. Mile heats, 
three in five, to harness. First colt to receive cup and six-tenths; second colt, 
three-tenths; and third colt, one-tenth of the stakes. Five to enter, three to 
start. A horse not winning a heat in the first three shall not start for the 
fourth heat unless said horse shall have made a dead heat; but horses so ruled 
out shall have a right to share in the prize according to their rank in the sum- 
mary at the close of their last heat. Otherwise N. T. A. Rules to govern. 

Nominators are not held for the full amount of entrance in case colt goes 
wrong; only forfeit payments made, which relieves you from further responsibil- 
ity, and declares entry out. 

The stake of 1912 should receive a large entry, and be very valuable. Every 
breeder should enter in it. 

Remember the Date of Closing is January 1, 1910. 

H. A. JASTRO, President. J. A. FILCHER, Secretary, 

Sacramento, Cal. 

Pedigrees Tabulated 

(Typewritten, Suitable for Framing.) 

Stallion Folders 

with picture of the horse and terms on first page; complete 
tabulated pedigree on the two inside pages and description on 
back page. 

Stallion Cards 

Two sides, size % x 6J^, to fit exvelope. 

Stallion Cards for Posting 

Size, one-half sheet, 14 x 22; size, one-third sheet, 11 x 14. 



STALLION SERVICE BOOKS, $1. 

It Pays to Advertise Your Horse! 

Address, BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

366 Pacific Bldg. , San Francisco 

The First National Bank 

Corner Post and Montgomery Streets 

Complete Banking 
Service 

I. The First National Bank fully equipped for commercial business. 

II. First Federal Trust Company, associated with the First National Bank, 
pays interest on deposits, and takes entire charge of property, real and personal. 

III. Armor Plate Safe Deposit Vaults, the highest type of security, guarantee 
absolute protection for valuables. 

Inspection Invited 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 



Saturday, January 1, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



GOLCHER BROS. 

(Formerly of Clabrough.Golcher & Co.) 




Fine Fishing Tackle, Guns, Sporting and Outing Goods 

mens -r.mpor.ry 1883. 510 Market St., San Francisco 



MANUFACTURERS 
^OUTFITTERS 

FOR THE I 

SPORTSMAN 
CAMPER*! 
ATHLETE. 



(bmpanu J ev ery ne 



48-52 GEARY ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EQUIPMENT 
*! D APPARATUS 

FOR 

EV ERY NE ED. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
SUPPLIES. 



PHIL. B. BEKEART CO., Inc. 

Sole Pacific Coast Branch — Smith & Wesson. A.J. Reach Co.. Ithaca Gun Co., Iver Johnson's 
Arms and Cycle Works, Maxim Silent Fire Arms Co., The Planet Co., The Horton Manufacturing Co., 
F. W. Klinger & Langbein Co., E. C. Cook & Bro., Hamilton Rifle Co., Marlin Fire Arms Co., Mark- 
ham Air Rifle Co.. Ideal Manufacturing Co., Daisy Manufacturing Co., Mills Woven Cartridge Belt Co., 
King Manufacturing Co. 



No Stock Carried. 

Good. Sold to the Trade Only. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



No road too rough. Carries 
weight over the wheels, not 
on the axle. It has the 
strength. Never a tired driv- 
er after a long workout day. 
Why? The long spring makes 
it easy riding, and does away 
with all horse motion . Furn- 
ished with either Pneumatic 
or cushion tires . 



McMurray 

Sulkies and 
Jogging Carts 

Standard the world over. 

Address for printed matter and prices. 



Sales agent for 
California. 



W. J. KENNEY, 
531 Valencia St., San Francisco 



75 PER CENT 



OF ALL HORSE OWNERS 

AND TRAINERS 



USE AND RECOMMEND 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE FOOT REMEDY 



—SOLD BY— 




Sol. Deutsch San Francisco, Cal. 

Pierce Cotler Co Los Angeles, Cal. 

R. Grant Potter Sacramento, Cal. 

Miller A Patterson San Diego, Cal. 

J. G. Read A Bro.. Ogden, Utah 

E. H. Irish Butte, Mont. 

A. A. Kraft Co , .Spokane, Wa.h. 

Thos. M. Henderson Seattle, Wash. 

C. Rodder Stockton, Cal. 

W in . E. Detels Pleasanton, Cal. 

V. Koch . San Jose, CaL 

Keystone Bros. ..... San Francisco, Cal. 

Fred Reedy Fresno, Cal. 

Jno. McKerron San Francisco, Cal. 

Jos. McTlgne San Francisco, Cal. 

Brydon Bros Los Angeles, Cal. 



Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs 
Act, June 30, 1»06. Serial Number 1219. 



JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison Street, Chicago. 



ROSS McMAHON 



Awning and Tent Co. 

Camp Furniture, Awnings, Hammocks and Covers in stock and to order. 
Flags an l Banners. 

Phone Kearny 2030. 403 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



ADVERTISE IN THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN. 



Full Gamesack 

Is possible if birds are plentiful, if your hand and 
eye are working smoothly, and if you are using 

The Right Kind of Loads 



SHELLS LOADED WITH ANY 



all PONT 



— — ... . .. - 

SPORTING POWDER 

Are the Right Kind to Use. 

SPECIFY FOR 



POWDERS. 



Accept No Others. 




AN UNPARALLELED RECORD IN SHOOTING HISTORY MADE BY THE PARKER GUN. 

At Chicago, the week beginning June 21. Mr. Frank Fisher won the Preliminary Handicap from 
the 18 yard mark, shooting at ten doubles and eighty singles— score, 94. 

Mr. Fred Shattuck won the Grand American Handicap from the is yard mark— score, %, and .0 
straight in the shoot-off. , , ,. . 

Mr Fred Gilbert again won the Professional Championship with a score of 193 out of 200, which 
included 40 doubles, of which he broke 37. making his second consecutive winning of this classic 
event, and the fourth consecutivo winning for the PARKER GUN. 

THE PARKER GUN also won tho High General Averngo for the entire tournament, thus winning 
about all there was In sight. 

PARKER BROS., MERIDEN, CONN, ioid..toun Buiid.r. m Am.no..: 

New York Salesrooms, 32 Warren St. 




Take II In lime, 

If you have the remedy on hand, and are ready to 
act promptly, you will find that there is nothing in 
the form of Spavins, Splints, Curbs, WindpufTs and 
Bunches which will not yield promptly and perma- 
nently to 

Q st inn's Ointment 



iiffinrlB of good borne n from the pnlillrr's 
ken-down horwo nmrkct. Mr. C. B. Diek- 
iHigest livcrv ntnhUs in the North went, 
1 with the ; i ■ " 1 1 t , 



It has saved tli 
cart and the br 

\l^%^m&83S&r* * 

°> VrVo. • 1 .00 p.% b.m.. Kohl by all druggist, or ..a t by malL 

testimonials, etc. sent yy m g. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, Nm Ym 



Bit hns no equal.' 
Write ub for circulars. 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 1, 1910. 




^XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX^XXVXXXXX^XX^XXVXXXXXXXXXXXXX\\\\*N^^ 

EVERY AMATEUR AVERAGE * 

At the Missouri and Kansas League Tournament, Kansas City, Nov. 9-10, was won with 



PETERS SHELLS 



1st Amateur — Wm. Veach, 
2nd " — W. Henderson, 



358 out of 400 
357 out of 400 



374 out of 400 3rd Amateur — Harvey Dixon, 
371 out of 400 4th " — F. Huston, 
5th Amateur — Dick Linderman, ■ ■ 357 out of 400 

PETERS FACTORY LOADS make top-notch scores possible, even in the lace of had weather conditions, such as prevailed at the Kansas City Ebool 

You should use PETERS SHELLS in your field shooting. They kill the game cleaner and make limit hags easy. If you want to use your trap gun for birds, 
insist on PETERS SPREADER LOADS. The only really successful and practical spreader shells on the market. 

.\ew \ork: its t hum Iter n St., T. H. Keller, Mier. 
San Krancitieo: 608-612 ll<»varil St., J. S. French, Mgr. 
New Orlennxt 321 Magazine St., J. \V. Onborne, Mgr. 



THE PETERS CARTRIDGE COMPANY, CINCINNATI, 0. 




WINCHESTER 

Guns and Ammunition. 



it 



THEY NEVER FAILED ME." 



-HARRY WHITNEY 



From the frozen north as well as from sunny Africa comes more enduring praise for the entire reliability of Winchester 
(inns and Ammunition — the Keel W Brand. Harry Whitney, who recently returned from the Arctic, where he spent 
fourteen months and hunted farther North ami achieved greatei success than any sportsman ever did hefore, wisely 
pinned his faith to the Red W combination. He sa3 T s of it: 

"I used two Winchesters: A Model '95 .30-40 and a .22 Automatic and Winchester Cartridges with both. 
Neither the extreme cold nor rough handling affected their worhing or accuracy. They never failed me." 

THE EQUIPMENT OF MEN OF ACHIEVEMENT. 




WATCH the STRING of SELBY VICTORIES 

Spokane, Seattle, Portland, 
Medford, Anaconda, Tacoma, 
and San Francisco. 

Ask the Shooter Who KNOWS! 



^SH OTiCTU N 




SELBY SMELTING & LEAD CO., 



San Francisco, Cal. 



ADVERTISE in the Breeder and Sportsman! 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 8, 1910. 



MR. CHARLES L De RYDER 

is preparing a consignment of exceptional merit for shipment to our thirtieth 
sale, to be held 

FEBRUARY 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 

and will gladly superintend other California consignments. 
Mr. De Ryder has place for three more head in his 
car shipping from Pleasanton, and will accept, for 
shipment, THREE HIGH-CLASS HORSES. 

Particulars of this great sale and entry blanks may be had upon application to 
Mr. Charles L. De Ryder. Pleasanton, Cal. 

CHICAGO »« sAiE COMPANY 



AT 



GOOD 
HORSES 
SELL 
BEST 

AT CHICAGO 



Pleasanton, 



CAL. 



Chicago, Illinois. 



The following representative lots will 
be features at the 
February Chicago Sale: 
The PETER THE GREATS 
The RED MEDIUMS 
The OAKLAND BARONS 
The WILLIAM PENNS 
The QREYSTONES 
The ECHO BELLS 
The BARONMORES 
The PATCHEN WILKES 
The GRAYDONS 
The SIDNEY DILLONS 
The J. J. AUDUBONS 
The BARON POSEYS 
The JOHN G. CARLISLES 
The ED. CUSTERS 
The KLATAWAHS 

and drafts from every prominent training 
stable in the Middle West. 



Every Horse Should Be Clipped in Season 

It is the wise thing to do for the clipped horse not only is easier to clean and looks better, but clipping does much to make him 
immune from coughs, cole's and the usual ills that come to a horse from standing in a coat of long, wet hair after any hard 

The prespiration evaporates quickly from the clipped animal and leaves him dry. On 




exertion. 



cold days a blanket when he stands keeps him comfortable. 



The Best Clipping Machine the World has ever Seen is the 



Stewart Ball Bearing Enclosed Gear Machine 

It is the easiest turning, fastest clipping and most enduring of all machines. The materials in it are 
all of better quality, the workmanship is superior. All file hard cut steel gears, protected from dust 
and dirt and running constantly in oil. It couldn't be better for twice the money. 

Write for the New Catalog Send Now 

CHICAGO FLEXIBLE SHAFT COMPANY, 204 Ontario Street, CHIGAGO 




Insure Your Live Stock 



I N DIANA AND OHIO 




HoRSEs.Mi/LES H Cattle 

NST QEA TH F 
■ ANY CAUS £ 

ESTABLISHED /8S6 



State Agents: 



W. T. CLEVER DON, 350 Sansome St., San Francisco. 
J. ED VAN CAMP, Germain Bldg., Los Angeles. 



LARGEST and OLDEST 
STOCK COMPANY 



Assets $350,000. 



No Assessments. 



Responsible parties with 
good business desiring 
agencies apply to State 
Agents. 



HEALD'S 
BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

trains 
for 
Business 
and places 
its graduates 
in positions. 



Call or write 
426 MoALLISTER ST. 

San Francisco. 



WM. F. EGAN. M.R.C.V.S. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 

1155 Golden Gate Av- 

Branch Hospital, corner Webster ana chestnut 
Streets. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



The First National Bank 

Corner Post and Montgomery Streets 

Complete Banking 
Service 

I. The First National Hank fully equipped for commercial business. 

II. First Federal Trust Company, associated with the First National Bank, 
pays interest on deposits, and takes entire charge of property, real and personal. 

III. Armor Plate Safe Deposit Vaults, the highest type of security, guarantee 
absolute protection for valuables. 

Inspection Invited 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 



New Edition of John Splan'a Book 



Life With the Trotter" 



Price, $3.00, Postpaid. 

" Life With the Trotter fives us a clear insight into the ways and means to be adopted to increase 
pace, and preserve it when obtained. This work is replete with interest, and should be read by all 
sections of society, as it inculcates the doctrines of kindness to the horse from start to finish. 

Address. Breeder and Sportsman I . O. Drawer 447. San Francisco. Cal. 

Pacific Bldg-.. Cor. Market and Fourth Sts. 



Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 



Breeder and Sportsman 



Saturday, January 8, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



-<^»<5^THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 

I\ W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 
O 

Turf and Sporting Authority of th* Pacific Coast. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACIFIC BUILDING, 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco Post-Oftice. 



Terms— One Year. $3; Six Months. $1.75; Three Monthi. fl. 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley. P. O. Drawer 447. San Francisco. Calif. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name 
and address, not necessarily tor publication, but as a private 
guarantee of good faith. 



FRANK H. JERMYN died in this city on Monday 
last, January 3d, from the effects of injuries received 
by being struck by an electric car on Market street, 
near the Palace Hotel, on the morning of New Year's 
clay. Mr. Jerniyn was alone at the time of the acci- 
dent and had evidently started to cross the street, 
but seeing a car coming west, turned back and walked 
in front of one rapidly moving east. He was very 
badly injured, several of his ribs being broken so 
that they punctured his vital organs and his spine 
was also fractured. In spite of these injuries he 
survived until Monday when death came to his 
relief. Mr. Jermyn was one of the best known horse- 
men in America and had been interested in harness 
horses ever since he attained manhood, although 
none of his horses were raced in his name. For 
twenty years he had spent the greater part of each 
winter in California, often following the Grand Cir- 
cuit races during the summer. He was a son of the 
late John Jermyn, one of the wealthiest coal oper- 
ators of Scranton, Pa., who left an estate valued at 
many millions of dollars, Frank Jermyn being one 
of five brothers who inherited this vast fortune. He 
was a widower and leaves one daughter, aged 20 
years, who is pursuing the study of music in Paris. 
He was 52 years of age. Frank Jermyn was a man 
who made hosts of friends. He had a genial per- 
sonally, was fond of entertaining, and if all the 
charitable deeds he has done quietly and without 
ostentation, could be recounted, they would fill a 
large space. As soon as possible after he was in- 
jured he was taken to a sanitarium, physicians sum- 
moned and everything that was possible to alleviate 
his sufferings was done. His relatives in the east 
were notified and a brother immediately started for 
San Francisco, but of course could not arrive in time 
to see him before his death. Funeral services were 
held at Gray's chapel on Geary street on Wednesday 
evening which were very largely attended, many 
friends coming from distant points in the State to 
pay their last sad respects to deceased. The serv- 
ices of the Episcopal church were read and Hon. 
Samuel Shortridge delivered a most touching and elo- 
quent eulogy, while the Knickerbocker quartette ren- 
dered beautiful and appropriate music. The remains 
were shipped east on Thursday by his brother Ed- 
ward who accompanied them. Deceased had scores 
of warm friends in California, many of whom were 
very close to him and will mourn his death as 
brothers. 

ON ANOTHER PAGE of this issue will be found 
an article under the heading "Remount Station 
Needed Here," which we commend to the careful 
perusal of our readers. The United States Army 
now has several of these stations in different parts 
of the country where young horses of the proper 
conformation are taken and trained for the different 
army uses to which their size adapts them. The 
army has found that the cavalry and artillery regi- 
ments can be better supplied with good animals by 
this plan, than by purchasing the already broken 
and matured horse, and re-training him for its uses. 
It is strange that a remount station has not been 
established in California before this, but it has not 
been done, and a movement is now on foot to induce 
the War Department to locate one here. This is a 
measure that could be taken up with propriety by 
all Boards of Trade and kindred organizations in the 
State, and should be. A remount station here would 
within a few years be a large source of revenue to 
the State. It would handle not less than 1000 horses 
annually, and these would be purchased from breed- 
ers and other owners, while the forage for their 
keep would also be purchased here. As the army 



needs these stations all that is now required to 
have one located in California is prompt, concerted ac- 
tion on the part of our leading commercial bodies in 
conjunction with our Congressmen and Senators to- 
ward inducing the War Department to locate such a 
station in this section. During the next few weeks 
the commercial bodies above referred to will prob- 
ably take action in this matter, and we hope that 
every reader of the "Breeder and Sportsman" will 
lend his aid to the movement, as it will be of actual 
benefit to every horse breeder on the coast as well 
as to many others, and be of detriment to no on. 

o 

JIM McCUE, as the rugged old pioneer was known 
from San Diego to Nome, died at his home in Corte 
Madera, Marin county, California, on January 3d 
at the age of 80 years, his death being the result of 
injuries sustained by being thrown from his buggy 
three weeks previous. James S. McCue was one 
of the picturesque characters of California. He was 
born in Stark county, Ohio, in 18: J ,0, but came to 
California "around the horn" in 1849. He was a 
born horseman and began life as a stage driver, 
finally becoming the owner of numerous stage routes 
in the early days, and as there were many opposi- 
tion lines, wrangles were numerous, but it was sel- 
dom that Jim McCue came out second best in any 
of them. He loved to put his ideas in print and pub- 
lish them broadcast and started two or three news- 
paper ventures and printed numerous pamphlets. 
At one time he was in the circus business, the fea- 
ture of the show being a platoon of twenty horses 
that he put through a drill like well trained soldiers. 
When gold was discovered in Klondike, McCue or- 
ganized a pack train from Dawson to Sitka and made 
money. In 1901 while crossing the bay on the ferry 
steamer San Rafael a collision occurred and this 
steamer sank. McCue escaped wit,h several serious 
injuries, one of them being the loss of an ear. He 
sued the corporation owning the steamer and was 
awarded $5000 damages. McCue was the primary 
cause of the conviction and sending to prison of 
W. B. Bradbury, the millionaire of this city, who 
was the owner of Little Albert 2:10. They had a 
law suit and McCue had Bradbury arrested for per- 
jury on the witness stand, and the latter was con- 
victed and sentenced to one year in prison. Jim 
McCue was a graphic and entertaining writer, and 
some of his writings were decidedly humorous. For 
instance, when the president of the transportation 
company against which he had obtained a $5000 
judgment for the loss of an ear claimed that the 
amount was excessive McCue printed an open letter 
to him in which he made the following proposition: 
"Make out your check for the full amount you think 
an ear is worth and tender it to me. I will either 
accept the check or take your ear." There will be 
no history of California complete without the story 
of the life of James S. McCue, one of the best horse- 
men that ever lived and one of those rugged, fearless 
characters who accomplished things by rolling up his 
sleeves and going at them. 'Hundreds of old friends 
will regret his death. and talk over early California 
scenes in which he played a prominent part. 

FIRST IN THE FIELD to claim a date for the 
California Circuit of 1910, is the Woodland Driving 
Club, of which Mr. H. P. Aronson has recently been 
elected secretary. Every horse owner in California 
should rise to a vote of thanks to this enterprising 
organization that has thus taken the initiative and 
let the public know that Woodland, for one, will be 
on the route of fair and race meetings for 1910. The 
date claimed by the Woodland association is the 
same relatively as last year — the second week before 
the California State Fair, which will place it some 
time in August. We extend our congratulations 
to the Woodland Driving Club for its energy and 
enterprise, and hope its example will quickly be fol- 
lowed by other organizations in the State. We 
would like to have 'a good long list of 'Dates 
Claimed" for publication in the "Breeder and Sports- 
man" by February 1st. Who's next? 



TWO STAKES FOR TWO-YEAR-OLDS, guaran- 
teed to be worth $1000 each by Messrs. C. A. Can- 
field and W. A. Clark Jr. of Los Angeles, are an- 
nounced by the California Breeders' Association of 
Los Angeles. Stake No. 1 is to be raced in 1910, 
and stake No. 2 in 1911. Stake No. 1 will close 
for entry on February 1st with a payment of $10, 
there is to be another payment of $15 on June 1st, 
and a final payment of $25 ten days before the 
meeting, making a total entrance fee of 5 per cent 



of the stake. Stake No. 2 will also close on Febru- 
ary 1st, for now yearlings, the first payment being 
$5, the second payment $10 on November 1st, the 
third payment $10 on April 1st, 1911, and the final 
payment $25 ten days before the meeting. No addi- 
tional money will be taken from money winners in 
either of these stakes. Messrs. Canfield and Clark 
have certainly shown great liberality in guarantee- 
ing these two stakes to be worth $1000 each, and we 
hope the stakes will receive large entry lists and 
result in high class racing. The stakes will be trotted 
at Los Angeles under the auspices of the California 
Breeders' Association. By referring to our adver- 
tising columns the conditions governing these stakes 
will be found. 

o 

THE HORSE WORLD published at Buffalo, New 
York, has issued a very beautiful Christmas number 
of 100 pages, printed on heavy paper and handsomely 
illustrated. Notable articles in this number are 
"Harness Racing in 1909" by Driftwood, "The Three 
in Five System" by H. K. Devereux, "Canadian 
Horsemen and Racing" by Frank G. Smith, "Inbreed- 
ing the Wilkes Blood" by Raymond and "The Wilkes- 
Electioneer Cross" by the same writer. 

DAN PATCH AND MINOR HEIR AT HOME AGAIN. 



The two great pacers Dan Patch and Minor Heir 
returned from California last month in good con- 
dition and although they came direct from the land 
of sunshine and flowers, they seemingly entered at 
once upon the enjoyment of the rigorous Minnesota 
winter weather, says the American Sportsman. 

These two fast pacers won new friends on their 
Western trip and while Dan Patch has traveled ex- 
tensively this was his first trip to the Pacific Coast. 
On the afternoon of Thanksgiving both gave exhi- 
bition miles over the Agricultural Park track, Los 
Angeles, Cal. The St. Paul Pioneer Press of St. 
Paul, Minn., had the following interesting comment 
on the trip: 

Horsemen who knew the conditions and saw Dan 
Patch work at Phoenix are unanimous in their ex- 
pression of the opinion that there never was and 
never will be another Dan Patch. "With that 
amount of work and that leg, there isn't another race 
horse in the world that could be pulled down the 
stretch with an automobile," declared one horseman 
who watched Dan Patch warming up for his exhibi- 
tion at Phoenix last Saturday. In spite of this the 
champion went to the half-mile post in 59% seconds, 
then his lack of work told some, but he finished 
gamely in the face of a heavy wind in 2:02% and 
was given an ovation second to none that he ever 
received after having broken a world's record. 

The supreme nerve and courage and gameness of 
the champion of champions compels the love and 
admiration of all who know him. 

Minor Heir, who in the fall of 1908 became the 
stable mate of the more illustrious pacer, has ac- 
quitted himself with unusual honors. All season he 
has been handicapped with either bad weather or bad 
tracks. During the first of the year his terrific work 
of 1908 had its effect upon his condition. He has 
been steadily improving, however, and his exhibitions 
all through the Middle West and South have aroused 
much interest and won him thousands of friends. 
During the season he has gone five miles faster than 
any other harness horse arid at Phoenix, Ariz., last 
Saturday, lowered his own record and tied the world's 
record for an unpaced mile. 

The majority of the experienced horsemen who 
were present say that Minor Heir went the route 
in 1:59 flat and now should hold the world's record 
instead of having to share it with Star Pointer and 
Audubon Boy. His performances made a tremen- 
dous impression and the people who watched it aiv 
prodigal of predictions for his future greatness. 

The fact that Minor Heir paced a mile in the re- 
markable fast time of 1:59% is not as pleasing to the 
followers of the horse as is the fact he demon- 
strated his gameness and staying qualities. His fin- 
ish was magnificent. The last 100 yards of the mile 
were paced at a terrific clip and proved that the 
son of Heir-at-Law when in condition will not stop. 
His finish is the talk of Phoenix and the surrounding 
country" 

o 

SAN FRANCISCO DRIVING CLUB ELECTION. 

The regular annual election of the San Francisco 
Driving Club was held Thursday evening of this 
week. The members held a smoker, had refresh- 
ments served and a general good time followed the 
election. This club distributed nearly $3000 during 
1909, and the racing season of 1910 will be still 
greater. The officers elected are the following: 

President, W. J. Kenney; vice-president, Bert Ed- 
wards; secretary, James McOrath; treasurer, F. P. 
Lanterwasser Jr.; sergeant -at-arms, H. Schottler. 

Board of Stewards — George E. Erlin, John No\v- 
lan, F. L. Matthes, Al Hoffman, J. E. Finch. 

Classification Committee — W. Higgenbottom, C. 
Buckley, Tim Sexton, Dan Hoffman and C. L. Becker. 
o 

Now is a good time to register your colts. Several 
good sales have been lost in California during the 
last few months because the animals were not reg 
istered. 



t 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 8, 1910. 



BEST BRED SON OF NUTWOOD WILKES. 

Just as sure as he lives and gets an average num- 
ber of good mares to be mated with, Mr. E. D. Dud- 
ley's young stallian Palite 450C2 will be one of the 
great sires of speed on this coast. Palite is a young 
horse, being a foal of 1903, consequently has made 
but few and mostly very limited seasons in the stud 
up to last year when the breeders of Solano and Yolo 
counties saw that his get were wonderfully fast young 
trotters and they bred quite a number of mares to 
him. This year he will doubtless make a good sea- 
son as his merits are being recognized by all Cali- 
fornia breeders. 

There were just two of his get raced last year 
for the first time — a two-year-old colt and a three- 
yeadold filly. The colt now known as Pal 2:17% 
started in the Pacific Breeders' Futurity at Salinas 
when out of condition and the showing he made there 
did not attract much attention to him as he was out- 
side the money, but when he reached Woodland he 
won the two-year-old stake in straight heats in 
2:18% and 2:11%, beating such good colt trotters 
as Babe Verne, Yu Tu and Alto Express, and showed 
himself to be as game a colt as ever stepped a mile 
in a race. At Sacramento he won the two-year-old 
stake two weeks later in 2:21 and 2:18 over a 
slower track. At the same meeting the Occident 
Stake was won by the Zombro colt El Volante in the 
fastest time in which the stake was ever trotted 
and in the second and fastest heat trotted in 2:13%. 
Complete, a filly by Palite was second and separately 
timed in 2:14%. The performances of these two 
caused the breeders to talk considerable about Palite 
as a coming sire, and when they looked into his won- 
derful pedigree they began arranging to book mares 
in 1910 to this successful young horse. Two months 
ago Palite's owner Mr. E. D. Dudley, of Dixon, sent 
to Sutherland & Chadbourne at Pleasanton, a year- 
ling by Palite out of the famous old broodmare Bee 
Sterling, that could show better than a 2:30 gait and 
worked eighths in 18 seconds in November last. This 
yearling is a good gaited and good looking colt and 
is faster than Pal was at the same age. As he is 
Bee Sterling's twelfth foal and all the rest are pac- 
ers, It shows that Palite is a remarkable controller 
of gait in his get. If he can get a trotter from old 
Bee, he will surely produce trotters from good trot- 
ting bred mares. 

But when Palite's blood lines are considered it is 
not surprising that he should sire fast trotters that 
come to their speed early. His sire Nutwood Wilkes 
2:16% was a fast trotter, by Guy Wilkes 2:15%, also 
a fast trotter and sire of fast ones, he by the great 
race horse Geo. Wilkes 2:20 founder of a great race 
winning family. The dam of Palite was Palita, that 
took a two-year-old record of 2:16 trotting, and 
has produced two standard trotters; his second dam. 
Elsie by Gen. Benton, has produced five standard 
trotters, two sons that have sired two, and three 
daughters that have produced five: his third dam is 
Elaine 2:20, dam of the champion yearling Norlaine 
2:31% and if four more standard trotters; his fourth 
dam is that famous broodmare Green Mountain Maid, 
dam of nine standard trotters, and of the great 

Elect i er and of three more producing sires and 

of five producing dams. There is not a stallion on 
this coast whose first four dams have produced as 
many standard trotters as the four dams of Palite. 

W hen therefore we scan his breeding and see what 
his colts are doing we cannot help predicting that 
he will be one of the great sires of the coast with 
ordinary opportunity. 

The fee for Palite's services for 1910 will be $40 
for the season, which is most reasonable. Palite will 
be at the ranch of his owner during the season where 
there is most excellent pasturage at the low rate 
of $2.50 per month. 

o 

At the recent International Live Stock Show the 
student judging team from the Animal Husbandry 
Department of the Iowa State College not only dis- 
tanced all other college teams but established a new 
team record of 4,970 points. This is some 300 points 
tiigher than the previous team record made by the 
Iowa team in 1903. The contest this year was the 
best ever held in every respect. Six American col- 
leges and the Ontario College of Canada contested for 
the coveted honors. All five of the Iowa boys stood 
in the first thirteen places,, four of them in the first 
seven places and three of them breaking all pre- 
vious individual records. The Iowa boys in the order 
of their standing were as follows: M. G. Thornburg, 
Linden, Iowa; J. I. Thompson, Jamaica, Iowa; O. D. 
Baker, Edmund, Wis.; R. W. Cassady. Whiting, 
Iowa, and Howard Vaughn. Marion, Iowa. In addi- 
tion to winning the. coveted trophy for their college, 
these young men won three of the J. O. Armour 
scholarships of $250 each. These scholarships will 
be awarded to worthy and needy young men who pur- 
sue the agricultural course at Iowa State College. 
Since 1901 nine International student judging contests 
have been held at Chicago. During that time the 
Iowa College boys have come back eight times with 
a trophy, having failed but once, that being the 1905 
contest. 



Geers has thirty-three horses in his stable at Mem- 
phis, Tenn., and several additions will be made dur- 
ing the month of January. The Harvester is in splen- 
did condition and Geers expects that there will be a 
new stallion king at. the end of the season of 1910. 



The Horse Review has increased the value of its 
colt stake to $15,000. 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



DEATH OF CHIMES 2:3034- 



The telegraph announces the death in Salem 
county, New Jersey, on January 2d, of the famous 
stallion Chimes, son of Electioneer and Beautiful 
BellB. He had lived to a good old age, having been 
foaled in 1884, consequently would have been 26 
years old had he lived until April] 1th next. Chimes 
was bred at Palo Alto Farm by the late Senator 
Stanford, and sold when a colt to Cicero J. Hamlin 
of East Aurora, N. Y., who placed him at the head 
of his famous Village farm, where he remained until 
the farm horses were dispersed a few years ago at 
Mr. Hamlin's death. 

While Chimes never obtained a standard record, 
he was a fast colt trotter, taking a record of 2:33% 
as a two-year-old and of 2:30% as a three-year-old. 
During his three-year-old form he was a big money 
winner in colt stakes, in which he walked over for 
the money. At Cleveland in September, 1887, the 
year he was three years old, Chimes first walked 
over for the Nursery Stake, value $1,250; then for 
the National Association sweepstake of $5,550, and 
then for the Matron Stake of $1,460. At Lexington 
the same year he started in the Kentucky Stakes 
worth $480 against Jeannie C, by Nutwood, and beat 
her in straight heats in 2:33%, 2:36% and 2:30%, the 
last heat giving him a record that he never lowered. 

At Hamlin's farm Chimes was a success as a sire 
from the beginning, his first standard performer 
being the two-year-old filly Chimes Girl that took a 
record of 2:26, when Chimes was seven years old 
She was the only standard performer for him that 
year, but the following year he put six new ones 
in the list, among them the pacer Merry Chimes 
2:14% and Midnight Chimes that took a three-year- 
old trotting record of 2:16%. From that time on 
Chimes' list of standard performers grew rapidly, in 
1893 the three-year-old filly Fantasy by him taking 
a record of 2:08%, which was a world's record. The 
next year she made another world's record by trot- 
ting a mile in 2:06 as a four-year-old, the fastest 
mile ever made by a four-year-old of her sex, Direc- 
tum's 2:05%, made the year before, being the only 
faster mile by a four-year-old of either sex. At the 
close of 1908 Chimes had 76 trotters and 40 pacers 
with standard records to his credit, and as five new 
performers by him entered the list in 1909, he is 
now the sire of 121 in the list, while nearly 40 of 
his sons and 50 of his daughters are also producers 
of standard speed. 

Chimes is the sire of nine 2:10 performers, the 
fastest being The Abbott 2:03%, that was; The 
world's champion trotter in 1900, taking that honor 
away from Alix 2:03%. The following year the 
stallion Cresceus dethroned The Abbott, however, 
and in the table of fastest trotters the Chimes geld- 
ing is seventh in the list, those with faster records 
being Lou Dillon 1:58%, Major Delmar 1:59%, Ham- 
burg Belle 2:01%, Sweet Marie 2:02, Cresceus 2:02% 
and Uhlan 2:02%. The daughters of Chimes have 
produced well, but of the six 2:10 performers out of 
them, all but one, Dare Devil 2:09, are pacers, Lady 
of the Manor 2:04% being the fastest. 

Six days before his death Chimes was sold by 
Benjamin Tuft of Salem, New Jersey, who purchased 
him at the dispersal of Village Farm, to G. McAllister, 
a blacksmith of Sharpstown. Tufts' home is six 
miles from Salem, and he hitched the old horse to a 
buggy and headed for home, starting off on a lively 
trot. As Chimes had not had a harness on for years 
and only been exercised on a walk, the drive he got 
from his new owner nearly exhausted him, and be 
was unable to get him home that day, but left him 
at a farm house over night. He took him home 
the next day but he only lived a few days there- 
after. 

o 

SPOKANE TRACK ITEMS. 



.1. H. Nickerson, of Alberta, has moved to MeMinn- 
ville, Oregon, with his mare Miss Jerusha by Zom- 
bro, that he intends entering in the 2:20 classes this 
year. He states that she has shown him miles in 
2:15V. and back in 2:11 on a half mile track and 
he thinks it will take a 2:05 pacer to head her on a 
good mile track. 

Frank Childs has the Zolock pacer Sherlock 
Holmes 2:06 at Spokane in fine shape, and the trot- 
ter Mayo 2:16% by Zombro, that is looked upon as 
one of the best prospects in his class there is in the 
Northwest. Other horses in his string are Hellens 
Jr., Lady Sunrise 2:15V 2 , Judge Dillard 2:12%, Zan- 
thus 2:11 and a yearling by Sherlock Holmes. 

Marvin Childs has accepted a position as trainer 
for Mr. S. S. Bailey of Albany, Oregon. 

Al Phillips is working three head at Spokane, a 
pacer by King Altamont, another pacer called Light 
o'Day, and a two-year-old trotter by Hellenes. 

Walter Maloney is jogging two head for his father. 
Hal Online and Zella Norte.— Rural Spirit. 

o 

The late Bishop T. A. Hendrick, in one of his ar- 
ticles that appeared in the August, 1889. issue of 
Wallaces' Monthly, under his pen name of "Aurelius," 
stated "That horse is greatest whose blood is most 
frequently found in the pedigrees of great trotters, 
other horses are great in proportion to the amount 
they contribute to the blood of great trotters, no mat- 
ter" whether their contribution comes through the 
male or female lines." 



It is rumored that a number of New York gentle- 
tlemen have guaranteed a sufficient sum to hold a 
Grand Circuit meeting at one of the New York 
tracks, presumably Brighton Beach. 



THE FIVE LARGEST WINNING TROTTERS OF 
1909. 



Margin 2:05% $20,250 

Penisa Maid 2:04% 19,388 

Baron Alcyone 2:15% 15,000 

Baroness Virginia 2:0S% 13,500 

Bob Douglass 2:06% 11,002 



The figures above, representing the five leading 
money-winning trotters of 1909, include, it should be 
stated, only the sums which each horse respectively 
won at the meetings in the Grand Circuit and at Lex- 
ington. All of them, except Bob Douglass, com- 
peted at meetings prior to the opening of the Grand 
Circuit, and Margin started at meetings after Lex- 
ington, so that the gross amount of their winnings 
during the entire season will represent considerably 
more than is expressed by the figures above. 

It will be seen that Penisa Maid gives Margin a 
close run for first honors. She was practically in- 
vincible when the season closed at Lexington, and 
with a little better break at the outset the daughter 
of Pennant 2:15, would undoubtedly have headed the 
list of big winners of the season. Margin made her 
bow to the race-going public this season at Terre 
Haute, Ind., July 14, where she met Penisa Maid, 
Marie N., Alice Roosevelt and three or four more 
with less class. The clip was furious, for that time 
of the year, and when the dust had settled it was 
found that the Iowa mare had first money, while 
Margin and Marie N. were tie for second and third. 
As "coming events cast their shadow before," Mar- 
gin indicated something of the form she was to 
display later by finishing second the second heat in 
2:10%. 

This form was clearly revealed two weeks later at 
the opening meeting of the Grand Circuit, in the 
classic Merchants and Manufacturers' Stake, for 2:24 
trotters, where Margin headed the summary, leading 
a classy field into camp in every one of the three 
heats, which were trotted in the astonishing time 
of 2:06%, 2:07% and 2:07%. The first heat was only 
a quarter of a second behind the best time ever made 
in this stake, and the three heats constitute a new 
record for it. 

Another $10,000 plum fell to Margin at Kalamazoo, 
though she by no means got away with it so easily 
as she did at Detroit. This was the Hotel Burdick 
Purse, and that Margin won the major share of it is 
due to the fact that the race ended with the fifth 
heat, and she had then won the first two. Judge Lee 
beat her the third and fifth heats, and El Victress 
won the fourth. Margin, however, had been second 
once and third once, and her position in the sum- 
mary was the best. The time was much slower than 
that at Detroit. 

The daughter of Time Onward won a $2500 stake 
at Grand Rapids the following week, and it was 
comparatively easy for her to do so, though Miss 
Florida forced her to step in 2:08% the first heat. 
Three weeks elapsed before Margin faced the starter 
again, and then it was the rich Massachusetts Stake, 
the chief event of the Readville meeting outside of 
the American Derby. She had a big task to defeat 
the fast field that opposed here here, but she did it, 
though it took the last fraction of her speed and 
the last ounce of her resolution. Se won both heats 
in 2:08% and 2:08%, respectively, and thus annexed 
first money in her third $111,000 race of the season. 

From the Readville meeting Margin was headed 
back to the West, landing at Indianapolis, at the 
Indiana State Fair, where, on September 8. she turned 
the tables on Penisa Maid, who had beaten her at 
Terre Haute In the opening race for both mares of 
the season. The race was practically a duel, for the 
clip was so fast that the only other starter, Esther 
Bells, was distanced in the first heat, which Margin 
negotiated in the feverish time of 2:05%, and slowed 
up at the wire at that. The first quarter in this heat 
was trotted in 31 seconds, and the half in 1:01%. 
A loafing heat followed, the time being only 2:10, 
but there was another lively scrap in the third heat, 
when Penisa Maid came like a storm in the stretch 
and forced McDonald to send Margin to her limit in 
win in 2:06%. The purse was $5,000. 

After another week's interrugnum Margin returned 
to the Grand Circuit at Columbus, where, on Sept. 
21, she entered the lists as a contestant for the $10,- 
000 Hoster-Columbus stake. She was a top-heavy 
favorite, although she had to face both the little 
Iowa mare and the bulldog Jack McKerron. The 
result was another reversal, for Penisa Maid carried 
off the big end of the purse, and Jack McKerron came 
second. In spite of a game struggle in which she 
finished three times second to the winner, Margin 
had to be content with third money. The time of 
the three heats, of which Jack McKerron won the 
first, was 2:07%, 2:06% and 2:07%. 

The $5,000 Buckeye stake, the principal event of 
the second week at Columbus, was practically a repe- 
tition of the Hoster-Columbus, except that Margin 
won the second division of the purse and Jack Mc- 
Kerron the third. The Hawkeye damsel won it in 
straight heats and showed a form that she had not 
before uncovered by stepping the three heats in 
2:05%, 2:08% and 2:06%. Margin was second in 
the first and third heats. 

At Lexington she started twice, the first time on 
Oct. 12, in the contest for the Walnut Hall Cup event, 
where again she had to meet and succumb to her 
bete noir, Penisa Maid. The time was slow because 
the weather and track were wretched and the best 
that the daughter of Time Onward could do was to 
finish twice second and once third when the Maid 
won in 2:14%, 2:13% and 2:15%. Two days later, 
in the West stake, she beat Oro Bellini, Martha Dil- 
lon, Frazee and Ed. Monahan in straight heats, the 



Saturday, January 8, 1910.1 



THE BUHEDER AND 



SPORTSMAN 



6 



fastest of which was 2:10%. Margin was sold soon 
after this and headed for California, where she will 
henceforth be handled by W. G. Durfee. On her way 
to the coast she stopped at Phoenix and annexed 
first money in another $5,000 event. 

Margin is a roan mare, foaled in 1903, got by Time 
Onward, son of Onward 2:25%, dam Alfemeda by 
Alfred G. 2:19%, son of Anteeo 2:16%, second dam 
Spanish Maiden 2:29% (dam of six) by Happy Me- 
dium, third dam Maggie Keene (dam of two) by Mam- 
brino Hatcher, son of Mambrino Patchen. She was 
bred by W. A. Dickinson, of Trenton, Ky., and was 
trained and driven in all her races by Lon McDonald. 
* * * 

Penisa Maid, the second largest money-winning 
trotter of the season, inaugurated her campaign at 
Terre Haute, Ind., July 14, In the race in which she 
defeated Margin and Marie N., as related above. 
Her first heat in 2:08% was an augury of the brilliant 
career that was before her down the "big line" to 
Lexington. Her next start was in the 2:11 class on 
the opening day of the Detroit Grand Circuit meeting, 
where the high hopes that had been entertained for 
her were temporarily dashed by her defeat by the 
erstwhile crippled and outclassed chestnut gelding 
Country Jay, who startled the whole Western Hemis- 
phere by trotting three heats in 2:07%, 2:09% and 
2:09%, Judge Lee winning the second in 2:08%. The 
best that the Iowa mare could show was to finish 
second in the first heat, and she had to be content 
with fourth money. Her showing at Kalamazoo the 
next week, in the Hotel Burdick purse, which was 
won by Margin, as already related, was even worse 
than that at Detroit, as the best that she could do 
was to finish second in the first heat in 2:09%, and 
for the first and only time in the season she finished 
behind the money. 

The tide began to turn when the new North Randall 
track was reached, however, where Penisa Maid 
showed a flash of her true form by forcing Bob Doug- 
lass out in 2:07%, 2:06%, and 2:06%, finishing sec- 
ond in the first two heats and third in the last. 
Penisa Maid was separatelv timed the second heat 
in 2:06%. 

The Hawkeye mare was almost cherry ripe by the 
time the Grand Circuit caravan reached the Fort 
Erie track, and it was easy for her to win the 2:20 
class against the rather commonplace field composed 
of Marie N., Dr. Jack and Almaden. The best that 
any of them could do was to force her to step one 
heat in 2:10, and after that the clip came back to 
2:12%, and she could go sidewise and beat her field. 
There was a vacancy in the Grand Circuit the fol- 
lowing week and she got no race. Her next essay 
was at Readville, where she cast her lot amid the 
horde of thirty-eight trotters who sought the bubble 
reputation in the second American Trotting Derby. 
The handicappers assigned her a position on the 
2:10 line in that memorable event, and from the mad 
scramble that followed she emerged in fifth position, 
winning a tidy sum. 

With Margin, she returned to the West after Read- 
ville, and her defeat by that mare in the $5,000 stake 
for the 2:20 class at Indianapolis on Sept. 8, has 
already been described. This was her last defeat dur- 
ing the year, however, for by the time her star had 
risen to the zenith and she was monarch of all that 
she surveyed, winning five straight races, and losing 
but one heat in the series. At Syracuse she defeated 
Jack Layburn, Alice Roosevelt, Jenny Constantine 
and three others in 2:06%, 2:07% and 2:07. At Col- 
umbus she won the Hoster-Columbus $10,000 stake, 
beating Margin and Jack McKerron, as before re- 
lated, the latter winning the first heat in 2:07%, and 
the Iowa mare the next two in 2:06% and 2:08%. 
During the second week at the same meeting she 
again beat the same two and took a new record of 
2:05% in the first heat. 

Bob Douglass fell before her mighty stride in the 
Transylvania stake at Lexington on Oct. 7, as well 
as four others of the best campaigners of the year, 
and though they forced her to go the first heat in 
2:04%, her present record, she was equal to the 
emergency, coming back in the third heat with an- 
other dazling mile in 2:05%. She trotted the last 
half of the first heat in this race in 1:01%. Her last 
race of the season was the 2:09 class during the sec- 
ond week at Lexington, where she had only two com- 
I>etitors, one of which was distanced in the first heat 
and the other nearly so in the second. The time 
was 2:06%, 2:05% and 2:08%, and considering the 
weather and track her second heat was pronounced 
better than her mile in 2:04% a week before. 

Penisa Maid is a bay mare by Pennant 2:15, son 
of Abe Downing 2:20%, he by Joe Downing 710, by 
Edwin Forrest 49. Her dam is Seneca Maid 2:20 
(dam of Mayflower 2:22%) by John Adams, and her 
second dam is untraced. She is owned and was 
driven the past season by M. D. Shut) of Rock Rapids, 
Iowa. 

* * * 

A very little space will suffice to recount the 
achievements of Baron Alcyone, the third largest 
money-winning trotter of the year, during the pasi 
season, as the large sum of $15,000 which stands 
to his credit was won in a single engagement, the 
second American Trotting Derby, which was con- 
tested at Readville August 31. In the big field of 
thirty-eight horses that took the word in this race 
for a $35,000 purse, Baron Alcyone was placed at 
the 2:19 mark, or 540 feet, ahead of the scratch, with 
no other horse ahead of him. He had recently worked 
a mile in 2:10%, and was the most favorably consid- 
ered of any in the big field. When the wire was 
reached the first time Baron Alcyone was in sixth 
position, with Hylie Bird, Axtator, Jim Ferry, Kaldar 
and Oxford Boy, Jr., in front of him, in the order 



named. One by one they dropped out until, as they 
swung into the back stretch, Baron Alcyone was 
fourth. He passed Kaldar and Oxford Boy Jr., at this 
point, and later overtook Hylie Bird, leaving only 
Axtator in front of him as they turned into the home 
stretch. The Axtell horse had a lead of two lengths 
and Harvey Ernest began to team the son of Baron 
II. as he never did a horse before. At the seven- 
eighths pole Axtator began to tire, and he surrendered 
at the long-distance, leaving Baron Alcyone to come 
home alone, two lengths in the lead. He made no 
other start in the Grand Circuit last season. 

Baron Alcyone is a bay gelding by Baron H. 2:19 
son of Baron Wilkes 2:18, dam Little Brownie, dam 
of two, by Alcone 6780, son of Alcyone 2:27; second 
dam Brownie, dam of one, by Jefferson Prince 6212. 
He is owned by E. I. White, of Syracuse, N. Y., and 
was driven by Harvey Earnse. 

» * * 

The honor of being the fourth largest money win- 
ner of the year goes to a three-year-old, the roan filly 
Baroness Virginia 2:08%, by Baron Review, who was 
helped materially to that distinction by her victory 
in the rich Kentucky Futurity. The roan filly, who 
took a record of 2:29% against time as a two-year- 
old in 1908, opened her campaign the past season 
at the half-mile track at Logansport, Ind., August 3, 
where she was second to Al Stanley 2:11%, in 2:24% 
and 2:27%. The same pair again met at the half- 
mile track at Lebanon, Ind., on August 11, where the 
son of Todd 2:14%, was again successful, though Bar- 
oness Virginia won the first heat in 2:14%, the fast- 
est record, at that time, ever made by a three-year- 
old trotter over a half-mile track. The effort took 
a lot out of her, however, and Al. Stanley won the 
next two heats in time seven seconds slower. The 
third contest between the pair came at Frankfort, 
Ind., August 17, and resulted as did the others, the 
Todd colt bearing away the big end of the purse, 
with Baroness Virginia chasing him out in both heats 
in 2:16% and 2:16%. Still a fourth time these fast 
three-year-olds were pitted against each other, joining 
issues at Lafayette, Ind., September 1 in a contest 
with no other starters, and with the same result, Al. 
Stanley winning two heats in 2:23% and 2:18. 

The roan filly's first victory came at the Indiana 
State Fair at Indianapolis, September 10, where she 
defeated Bertha C, O'Neil, James A., Ripy and the 
much touted Billy Burk in the contest for the West- 
ern Horseman purse for three-year-olds. Baroness 
Virginia lost the first heat to Bertha C. in 2:13%, 
but won the next two in 2:15 and 2:17. From this 
period on the Indiana filly was handled by the tal- 
ented Murphy, and she did not sustain another de- 
feat. At Columbus, September 22, she beat Vito, 
the redoubtable Czarevna and five other fast buds, 
in straight heats, trotting the first in 2:09% and the 
second in 2:11%, and at Lexington her victory in 
the memorable Kentucky Futurity is still fresh in the 
mind of every horseman. That she would have won 
this race if it had been best two in three, or if she 
had been driven out in every heat, is open to doubt 
— but that is another story. By annexing the $10,- 
000 first money in this event her winnings foot up to 
$13,500 for the season. 

Baroness Virginia is a roan filly by Baron Review 
2:21%, a son of Baron Wilkes 2:18, out of Spanish 
Maiden, dam of six, by Happy Medium 400. The 
dam of the Baroness is Virginia Reynolds, dam of one, 
by Jay Bird, her second dam is Harrie Wilkes by 
Eagle Bird 2:21, a son of Jay Bird, and her third 
dam is May Bloom, dam of one, by William L., an- 
other son of George Wilkes. It will be seen that this 
filly has four crosses to George Wilkes, two through 
Jay Bird, one through Baron-Wilkes and one through 
William L. She was bred by S. J. Fleming & Son, 
of Terre Haute, Ind-., and was driven the past sea- 
son by the elder Fleming and by Thomas W. Murphy. 
* * * 

Bob Douglass, the fifth largest winner of the sea- 
son, with a little over $11,000 to his credit, made his 
entrance into the racing arena this year at the De- 
troit Grand Circuit meeting, his first start since his 
three-year-old form in 1907, when, as just Douglass, 
without the "Bob," he won the Hartford Futurity and 
one other race, taking a record of 2:12%. His name 
was changed to enable him lo be registered. His 
race al Detroit was a si raight -heat virion over Alice 
Roosevelt, Montell and two other trotters, in 2:14% 
and 2:10%. He skipped Kalamazoo, but bobbed up 
at North Randall, where he won a brilliant victory 
over the afterward invincible Penisa Maid, Judge Lee 
and others, trotting the three heats in 2:07%, 2:06% 
and 2:06%, the second heat being his present record. 
His triumphal career was uninterrupted at Uuffalo, 
where he won the fastest four consecutive heats 
ever placed to the credit of any horse, namely, 2:116%, 
2:07%, 2:08% and 2:06%. The first half of the fourth 
heat was trotted in 1 :01%, which was one of the most 
creditable performances ever made by any horse. 

Bob Douglass lost the first race, as well as (he first 
heat of his entire career al Hai l ford, September 6. 
where the great four-year-old, The Harvester, forced 
him to defeat in the contest for the Charter Oak 
stake. He wrested the first heat away from the stal- 
wart son of Walnut Hall, just touching the record of 
2:06% that he had made at North Randall. He 
fought hard for the victory in the second heat until 
the three-quarter pole was reached, where he cried 
enough and dropped out, leaving The Harvester clear- 
ly master of the field. The gray stallion did not 
start again until Lexington was reached. Here he 
met Penisa Maid, that he had defeated- at North 
Randall in the Trannsyl vania stake, but the game 
little mare from Iowa had by this time at I ained to a 
form that no trotter out this year could surpass, and 
she beat the son of Todd in straight heats, covering 



the first mile in 2:04% and the third in 2:05% Bob 
Douglass was second in the first heat and was only 
beaten a length. This was his last race of the season. 

Bob Douglass is a gray stallion, foaled in 1904, got 
by Todd 2:14%, by Bingen 2:06%, dam Clycezone, 
by Cyclone, grandame Bettie P. by Col. Hambrick, 
son of Dictator. He was bred by Geo. W. Leavitt, 
of Boston, and driven by Lon McDonald. — Trotter 
and Pacer. 

o 

STALLION OWNERS' DUTY. 



Stallion owners sometimes forget that they owe 
something to the men who breed their mares to his 
stallion. If the latter have become patrons through 
the fact that the stallion has been well advertised, 
they have a right to expect that the owner will con- 
tinue to keep his horse prominently before the public. 
It is only by that method that the breeder can expect 
to find a good market for the foal when it becomes 
one, two or three years old. If the stallion owner 
relegates his horse to obscurity through lack of ad- 
vertising, then the market for the colt becomes re- 
stricted and the value of the colt decreases. If, 
on the other hand, the stallion has a national repu- 
tation, then the colt owner is assured of a good 
market, either at private or auction sale. It is with 
the expectation of being able to sell the resultant 
foal at a remunerative price that he has bred his 
mare to an advertised stallion in preference to 
patronizing the horse with only a local reputation. 
If before the foal becomes of marketable age the 
stallion owner neglects to keep his horse before thu 
public, then the expectations of the breeder are not 
realized, for a stallion withdrawn from public notice 
is soon forgotten. 

On the other hand, the stallion owner who, be- 
cause of a "full book," ceases to advertise, is fool- 
ing himself. If after several seasons of publicity 
the owner decides that advertising is a waste of 
money and that as patronage comes exclusively from 
his immediate vicinity he can afford to stop adver- 
tising, he is making a mistake that may take years 
of endeavor to correct, if, indeed, that is possible. 

It has been one of the most impressive lessons of 
the advertising business — not only in stallion adver- 
tising, but in all lines of business — that it is fatal to 
cease to advertise. If the advertising campaign la 
resumed after the lapse of a year or two, it takes 
double the original expenditure to get back to the 
high water mark, and more often the ground lost is 
never fully regained. To explain why this is so 
would take too much space right here, but all adver- 
tisers of experience and all advertising experts 
acknowledge this and accept it as a fact. 

If, after several years of advertising, an owner 
withdraws all publicity, the public — regardless of the 
facts — comes to the conclusion that the owner feels 
that his horse is a failure in the stud. The public 
always loves a winner, and if the stallion owner 
proclaims — by reason of lack of publicity — that, his 
horse is a failure, then in a short time the public 
stops patronizing his stallion. For one season he 
may retain his patrons, but after that they fall off 
rapidly. 

If the stallion's book was full last season, it is 
all the more reason why he should continue to ad- 
vertise, so as to provide a market for the colts, and 
thus make a profit for his patrons. Then the latter 
will return without urging. 

The owner of a colt by a well-advertised and well- 
known stallion will take a pride in developing it. He 
will feel that he is "in the fashion." He knows 
that if the colt develops speed he will be able to 
share financially in the reputation of the sire. If 
the stallion owner ceases to advertise, the colt owner 
will take little interest in developing the youngster's 
speed. "No reason," he argues, "why I should spend 
my time making a reputation for that sire. It the 
owner doesn't, think he is good enough to boost, I 
don't." — The Western Horseman. 

To meet the competition of motor cabs in London 
a reduction in the fare charged by hansom cabs has 
been made so that two persons can travel a mile 
for 12 cents. The motor car charges 16 cents. The 
reduction in fare promises, to a certain extent, to 
revive the use of the hansom cab, although the 
greater speed of the motor car is decidedly in its 
favor. The interesting fact is that hansom cabs and 
four-wheelers can be operated profitably for the 
very low fare of 12 cents a mile. An increase in 
the number of hansom cabs and four-wheelers to 
take care of the traffic now returning to them is 
being planned by the cab companies— Breeders' 
Gazette. 

John W. Pace, former publisher of the Nortn- 
western Stockman and Farmer, secretary of the 
Montana Livestock Association and secretary and 
manager of the Montana State Fair for some years, 
has accepted the secretaryship of the Washington 
State Fair. An effort will be made to make the 
Washington State Fair of 1910 one of the best given 
in the Northwest. 



Before going back to Europe, Isadore Schlesinger 
of Vienna, Austria, bought at private sale from Sen 
ator J. W. Bailey the brown stallion Luther Sexton 
2:10%, by Prodigal 2:16, dam Emily 2:11, by Prince 
Regent 2:16%, and he is now on his wav across the 
Atlantic. 



A. S. Donaldson of Denver, Colo., owns a yearling 
by Expedition 2:15%, out of Humboldt Maid 2:13%, 
that has shown three-minute speed. 



8 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 8, 1910. 



I NOTES AND NEWS 3 

Send your horses *o the Pleasanton Sale in March. 
Write to Fred H. Chase & Co. about it now. 



Hinjola 2:17% by Bingen 2:06%, owned at the 
Park Farm, Springfield, O., will be trained and raced 
this year. 



Among the 2:06 trotters of 1910 we think the name 
of the chestnut gelding Kid Wilkes will be found 
should he meet with no accident. 



If you have horses to sell they will bring full 
value at the big Pleasanton Sale in March. Better 
correspond with Fred H. Chase & Co. about con- 
signing them. 



The Harvester, four-year-old record 2:06% will be 
out again this year and with ordinary luck will 
reduce his record several seconds. 



The "Breeder and Sportsman's" stallion number 
will be out in February. It will be the best medium 
in which to advertise stallions making the season of 
1910 on this Coast. Apply for space soon. 



Wanda 2:17%, dam of The Roman 2:09%, etc., is 
safely in foal to Bon Voyage 2:12%. There should 
be two-minute speed in the foal. 



It is rumored that the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse 
Breeders' Association will give its annual meeting 
this year at the new mile track at San Jose. 



There are many farmers in California who wish 
they had the draft mares they sold a few years ago. 
The demand for heavy horses is so great now that 
two and three-year-olds are being put to farm work. 



Charley Marley of Woodland worked his yearling 
colt Sir Poleon by N'ushagak a half in 1:16% in De- 
cember. Sir Poleon is a very promising pacer. 

The Sidney Dillon mare Sophie Dillon 2:11% fln- 
nished her 1909 campaign sound and all right and 
will be in the 2:10 list early in the racing season 
of 1910 in all probability. 

Dr. J. C. McCoy believes that the trotting record 
will finally be faster than tile pacing record, which 
is rather hard to believe although the Doctor pre- 
sents several very good reasons for his belief in an 
article in the Christmas Horse Review. 



Of the eighteen 2:10 performers to the credit of 
Gambetta Wilkes, all but three are pacers. No pac- 
ing bred stallion has sired as many 2:10 pacers as 
this son of George Wilkes. 



The pacer Albert Direda 2:14% by Robert Direct 
is now owned in Nebraska and is being advertised 
for sale. He is now a five-year- old. 



Baron Wilkes 2:18 is the leading broodmare sire 
of the year with 29 new performers produced by 
his daughters and of these only five are pacers. 



Constenaro 2:16%, sire of that good race trotter 
Paderewski 2:05%, is a very handsome horse and 
won the gold medal in the show ring of the Illinois 
State Fair of 1904. 



Monbells 2:23%, the last son of Beautiful Bells, 
got his first 2:10 performer last year in Esther 
Bells 2:08%. 



The fastest full brother and sister at the pacing 
gait are Hedgewood Boy 2:02% and Lady Maud C. 
2:02%. They also hold the world's record for a pole 
team— 2:02%. 



J. E. Montgomery is gradually getting together 
quite a string of horses to train at Pleasanton. He 
now has five in his stable, headed by the invincible 
Jim Logan. 



Charles De Ryder will have as nice a bunch of 
horses for the Chicago sale as were ever led into 
an auction ring. They are all in fine shape and will 
show well. 



Henry Helman thinks he has a good money 
winner for 1910 in Mr. H. E. Armstrong's recent pur- 
chase, the Stanford Stake winner of 1909, Easter 
2:15% by Monicrat. 



El Volante 2:13%, the Occident Stake winner of 
1909, is filling out and growing into a magnificent 
stallion. Mr. C. A. Canfield. his owner, has in him 
probably as well bred a young stallion as there is in 
America. 



Capt. C. H. Williams has consigned his hand- 
some stallion Knott McKinney to the Chicago sale 
and the horse will be shipped in care of Chas. De 
Ryder who has consigned nine head to this sale. 
Knott McKinney is by McKinney 2:11%, dam Net, 
dam of three in the list, by Magic, a son of Elmo 
2:27. He is a very handsome and stylish horse 
and has much natural speed. He should bring a 
good price in the Chicago market. 



Robert I. Orr and L. M. Ladd of Hollister were 
up to Napa last week and purchased three young 
Shire stallions recently imported from England, that 
Mr. Ladd says are the finest Shires he has ever seen. 



Every stallion owner should secure as good a pho- 
tograph of his horse as it is possible to get. A stal- 
lion picture is worth spending some time and money 
on, as there is nothing that appeals to a breeder like 
a handsome horse. 



Mr. Gerhard Wempe, accompanied by his wife, left 
San Francisco a few weeks ago for a tour of Eu- 
rope. He will be back in time to take part in the 
fall matinees of the Park Amateur Driving Club of 
which organization he is one of the most enthusi- 
astic members. 



Every time Budd Doble takes his chestnut colt 
Kinney de Lopez by Kinney Lou 2:07% on the track 
at San Jose the colt makes new friends. Doble will 
not give him any strong work until spring, but the 
colt can show better than 2:10 speed any time he 
is asked to. 



If Walter W. 2:06, the only undefeated pacer that 
raced on the Grand Circuit the past season in the 
stable of Ed. Geers, is sound and all right in 1910, 
he should step right close to 2:02. Shortly after 
winning at Indianapolis he developed lameness in 
his hips, which prevented his taking part in any of 
his later engagements. 



The well known young trainer Tommy Murphy, 
who landed such a large bunch of money down the 
Line in 1909, is now quartered at Macon, Ga., with 
a select string of both record and green prospects, 
and will give them the advantage of an early spring's 
work to better fit them for the arduous task of the 
coming summer. 



Nancy Gladys by Nutbreaker 2:24% is now the dam 
of two 2:10 trotters in Dulce Cor 2:08%, a big win- 
ner down the Grand Circuit a half-dozen years ago, 
and Dulce Jay 2:09%, one of the best through the 
Western circuits in 1909. 



A pacing horse named Louis Gentry, sired by John 
R. Gentry 2:00%, and owned by Harry Benedict, of 
East Aurora, is counted among the sensations of 
1910. He could beat 2:15 on a half-mile track the 
past season. 



Lon McDonald will have a very fast stable next 
year. He will have three fast stallions. Bob Doug- 
lass 2:06%; Aquin 2:08% and Justo 2:10%, several 
fast green ones and some very promising youngsters. 
McDonald is dead against three in five races and 
thinks the use of hopples should be prohibited. 



Atlantic 2:21, sold in 1S88 by Andy Welch to Ital- 
ian parties for $15,000, is yet among the living, al- 
though he is now 31 years of age. He has to his 
credit in "sunny Italy" 12 trotters with records from 
2:19 to 2:29%, and shares with Herchel 2:13 the 
honor of siring the most standard performers bred 
in that country. 



One of the first improvements at Readville track 
as soon as spring opens will be the widening of the 
stretch by six feet. Mr. Welch also intends to build 
a new judges' stand, which will be much lower than 
the present one with its steep steps. 

Wheels with a solid rubber cushion tire are very 
popular with horsemen who use carts during the win- 
ter months. W. J. Kenney at 531 Valencia street is 
making these wheels and has them in three grades 
at $25, $27.50 and $30 per pair. They are very easy 
riding, almost as fast as a pneumatic tired wheel and 
there is no fear of punctures. See Kenney or write 
to him and ask about them. 



The proposed National Champion Stake for three- 
year-old trotters continues to be the subject of dis- 
cussion among horsemen and we have yet to find any- 
one to say it will be other than a big success if 
started. Horse breeders want colts to have as big 
an earning capacity as possible and this stake will 
give more three-year-olds a chance to earn big money 
than any stake yet devised. 



One good resolution for trainers to make at the 
opening of the new year is to resolve to refrain from 
putting hopples on the colts until it is absolutely 
necessary. The day is coming when hopples will be 
barred, and when it arrives a string of hoppled 
horses won't be worth much. 



The Breeders' meeting, the California State Fair, 
the Oregon State Fair, and the Portland Fair 
are certain to be held as usual this year, and as all 
give liberal purses for trotters and pacers, owners 
and trainers are certain of some racing. It is un- 
fortunate that none of the smaller associations can 
be made to see the necessity of making early an- 
nouncements. 



Joe McGregor 2:21% is one of the best prospects 
for the slow class pacing events of this year. Fred 
Ward made a profitable campaign with him last 
summer and was close up in 2:07 and thereabouts 
in races, won by Adam G. 2:06%, Moortrix 2:07% 
and other fast ones. As Joe McGregor wears no 
hopples and is one of the most level headed of 
pacers we should not be surprised to see him take a 
record of 2:05 or better during the present year. 



E. W. Westgate of Rio Vista, sold a pair of two- 
year-old fillies lately for $500. These fillies were the 
right kind, the pair weighing about 3300 pounds. 
They were sired by McCormack Bros.' Belgian stal- 
lion Gasgar. This horse sires the low down drafty 
kind, with plenty of action and best of feet and bone. 

A 2:10 trotter can now be truthfully said to be "a 
member of the 400, " as there are now 400 horses 
that have trotted in 2:10 or better. An eastern 
journal says there are 402 2:10 trotters, counting 
Stamboul 2:07% and Guy 2:09% whose records are 
allowed by the National Association, but not by the 
American Trotting Register Association. 



The two-year-old record of 2:07% made by Native 
Belle has dispelled the delusion that no two-year-old 
would ever trot as fast as Arion 2:10%. It should 
also remove all doubts as to Lou Dillon's record of 
1:58%, being unbeatable. Trotting records are not 
down to the lowest notch by a good deal. 



In future efforts at record breaking the fastest 
third heat in a race by a three-year-old pacer, which 
now stands to the credit of J. E. Montgomery's colt 
Jim Logan 2:05%, will be one of the hardest ones 
to beat. We believe he is the only three-year-old 
pacer to beat 2:10 three times in one race. 



The Woodland Driving Association has claimed the 
second week preceding the State Fair for its meeting 
of 1910. This is the same place it held in last year's 
circuit and proved convenient for horsemen and exhib- 
itors. The Woodland Driving Club held a very 
successful meeting last year, financially and other- 
wise and proposes to hold a still better one this 
year. It's speed program will be arranged early. 



Ray Mead is working ten hours a day to keep 
everything in shape at his new track at San Jose. 
The track itself is becoming as smooth as a billiard 
table and looks like a future world's record mile. 
The stalls have been appreciated by the horses dur- 
ing the recent cold snap, as they are all draftless. 



The fair society of Akron, O., has purchased a new 
lot of ground, aggregating 80 acres and it is said will 
not only build a new plant, but will build both a 
mile and a half-mile track. The race meeting given 
at Akron this year In the Ohio Racing Circuit, was a 
big success. 



Charles De Ryder will take Star Pointer 1:59% 
back to his new, or rather his old home, when he 
ships his consignment to the Chicago sale. When 
he leaves Copa de Oro 2:01% will be the fastest 
pacer in the State and he is a home production and 
one of the best that ever looked through a bridle. 



Lady Search, the handsome daughter of Searchlight 
2:03%, dam Winnie Wilkes 2:17%, owned by C. H. 
Chandler of Sacramento, is now at Pleasanton in 
the hands of J. E. Montgomery. Lady Search has the 
honor of being the first animal ever shipped over 
the Western Pacific railroad. Mr. Chandler says she 
reached Pleasanton twelve hours after leaving Sac- 
ramento on the freight and arrived at the horse 
centre "as safe and sound as a new Easter bonnet." 



James H. Allen, founder of Springdale Stock Farm, 
near Derby, Ohio, died December 9, 1909, at the age 
of 72 years and eight months. Mr. Allen began 
breeding the trotting horse about 1870, and during 
the years from that time until the present had fol- 
lowed the business with an earnestness and en- 
thusiasm that never faltered, and that gave to him 
a measure of success that made him one of the best 
known of Ohio breeders. 



Lucyneer 2:27 by Electioneer is now the dam of 
five trotters: Lucrative 2:13%, Lucretia 2:14%, Min- 
nie B. 2:15%, Scientia (4) 2:22% and Lucie 2:25%. 
Lucyneer was out of that famous gray pacing mare 
Lucy 2:14, that in 1880 made such a memorable cam- 
paign with Sleepy Tom, Mattie Hunter, Rowdy Boy 
and Sorrel Dan. Lucy was brought to California by 
Orrin Hickok and was sold to Wm. Corbitt of the San 
Mateo Stock Farm who bred her to Guy Wilkes 
2:15% and produced the white-faced, white legged 
chestnut pacer Chris Smith 2:15%. She was then 
sold to Leland Stanford who bred her to Electioneer 
and the bay filly Lucyneer 2:27 was the result. All 
of Lucyneer's foals were bay. Lucy's pedigree was 
never traced. 



The reputation of Baron Wilkes 2:18 as a speed 
progenitor was greatly increased last season, both 
through his sons and daughters. His son Baron May 
trotted to a record of 2:07%. His son Moko sired 
Native Belle, that lowered the world's record for 
two-year-old trotters to 2:07%. Another son, Baron 
Review 2:21%, is the sire of Baroness Virginia (3) 
2:08%, winner of that memorable six-heat race, the 
Kentucky Futurity for three-year-old trotters. 
Daughters of Raron Wilkes 2:18 made a more won- 
derful showing as producers of new standard per- 
formers than had ever before been made in one 
season by the daughters of any stallion that ever 
lived. Not less than 23 of the daughters pro- 
duced 29 of the new performers of 1909. 
This is ten more new performers than were 
produced in 1909 by daughters of the noted 
brood-mare sire Nutwood 2:18%. It is also 12 
more than were produced by daughters of Onward 
2:25% and 16 more than were produced by daughters 
of Red Wilkes. 



Saturday, January 8, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



OUR LOS ANGELES LETTER. 



Los Angeles, Jan. 4, 1909. 

The heavy rains followed by the extremely cold 
weather has practically stopped training at Agri- 
cultural Park. 

On clear days or between showers the majority of 
the horses have been jogged a few miles on the inside 
track or on the roads but any fast work has been 
out of the question, and a mile or so in the "thirties" 
has been enough for the fastest of them. In fact 
most of the time has been devoted to the colts that 
have just begun their education and there are a 
number of them at the track that surely will be 
heard of later. Nearly every trainer has from one or 
two to six or eight in his charge and a very large 
percentage are very high class and bar accidents 
will turn out good race horses and some of them are 
good enough to stake almost anywhere. 

Alaca, a black colt that is now three years old, 
sired by Symboleer 2:09%, dam La Patchen, second 
dam La Belle by Joe Young 2:18, is one of the best 
looking and best gaited pacers in the city. He is 
owned by Mrs. Sam Murphy of Santa Ana, the 
widow of the well known trainer and driver Sam 
Murphy, who died a little more than a year ago. 
Mrs. Murphy decided to follow out her husband's in- 
tentions and have the colt developed and turned him 
over to Chas. Saddler, a friend of the family, to get 
in shape. Mr. Saddler has been jogging him on the 
road and through the streets, till he is now an 
ideal road horse safe for anyone to drive as he is 
fearless of all objects. He has had very little work 
and has never been called on for a mile nor even 
to extend himself for a quarter, yet he has stepped 
the latter distance in- 35 seconds with no more effort 
than stepping a "40" gait. He goes very light all 
round and wears absolutely nothing except the har- 
ness, not even quarter boots. On the road or reverse 
way of the track he trots a three-minute gait and 
does that like a trotter, but the minute you take him 
by the head and chirp to him he squares away on a 
pace and does not know what it is to make a break. 
He will soon be taken out to Agricultural Park and 
put in training. 

C. A. Canfield's great colt El Volante is turned out 
in a corral every pleasant day and is filling out in 
every way. He is a better looker now than his 
sire and when he gets his growth, even Mambrino 
King at his best was not handsomer than he will be. 

Red Gerrety is handling a nice-looking big open 
gaited colt that looks as if it would be good, as well 
as breaking a weanling for Secretary Knight of the 
American Trotting Association. 

W ill Durfee has so far recovered from his severe 
attack of rheumatism that he was out jogging one 
of his string the other day. His assistant Frank 
Wood has been confined to the house lately by a 
heavy cold. 

There will be a meeting of the board of directors 
of the Los Angeles Driving Club tomorrow after- 
noon to fix a date for the next matinee, and on the 
evening of Monday, January 10th, a meeting of the 
club to amend the by-laws. 

Messrs. Canfield and Clark have decided that the 
stakes they offer of $1000 each shall be for two-year- 
old trotters, one to be decided this year and one in 
1911 with 5 per cent entrance and nothing deducted 
from money-winners; the dates for payments and 
conditions are advertised in this issue of the "Breeder 
and Sportsman." They will be raced under the aus- 
piecs of the California Breeders' Association, of 
which William L. James, 317 West Seventeenth, 
street, Los Angeles, is secretary and will probably 
take place here next fall over the new track and 
during the trotting meeting at the Agricultural Fair 
that unquestionably will be held then. The entry 
blanks for these stakes will be mailed to all the 
horsemen and stock farms on the Coast as soon as 
they come from the printers, probably the last of 
this week. 

Among the best looking younr; things at Agricul- 
tural Park now is a black gelding belonging to J. H. 
Vance, a black filly by Red McK. owned by Jos. H. 
Walker, J. S. Stewart's bay pacing colt by Zolock, 
Perry Cleveland's brown colt by Cochato, W. A. Glas- 
cock's bay two-year-old in J. S. Stewart's string and 
a big brown colt by Walter Barker that Walter 
Maben is training for C. A. Canfield. 

JAMKS. 

o 

CHRISTMAS RACING AT BISBEE. 

The Warren District Driving Club of Bisbee, Ariz., 
held its first meeting on its new half-mile track De- 
cember 26th. There was an attendance of five or 
six hundred people, and the racing was greatly 
enjoyed. 

The trotting race was won by Black Bird, driven 
by Abrams, in straight heats; Prince Sutter, driven 
by Hanks, and Brodie, driven by Mosher, being 
second and third. The time was 1:24 and 1:22. 

Maud C. and Dolly Fletcher were the heat winners 
in a pacing race in which there were several starters. 
Maud C. took the first heat in 1:21, Dolly winning 
the next two in 1:15% and 1:16%, the others far 
behind. 

A match pacing race between Mosher's Klondyke 
and Cananea's Si Perkins, driven by Barnett, was 
won by the former in straight heats in 1:21% and 
1:21%. 

A half mile dash for runners was won by Prince 
Blaze, owned by Percy Neal, in :54%. 

Considering this was the first meeting ever held by 
the club, everything passed off well and the officials 
in charge were warmly congratulated. C. 



REMOUNT STATION NEEDED HERE. 



The difficulty of obtaining army mounts for the 
cavalry and field artillery, and animals for the quar- 
termaster department has forced the war department 
to establish remount stations. Several of these have 
already been established, the most important one 
being located at Fort Reno, Okla., from which point, 
as far as possible, the army will in the future be sup- 
plied. 

An army remount station is a rendezvous where 
a large number of animals are matured, handled and 
trained for the military service. 

For this purpose young horses three and four years 
old are purchased whenever found suitable and 
shipped in to the station. 

On the other hand when horses are required for 
the service, matured, well broken and trained horses 
are sent out from the station to supply the demand. 

The advantages of this system to the army are ob- 
vious and need not be enumerated here. The advan- 
tages to the breeders and the community in which a 
remount station is located are many more than may 
appear at first thought. 

A few of the most important are as follows: 

The breeder will have a market for his horses two 
years earlier than in former times; will not have 
the expense and risk of breaking his stock, all that 
is required will be soundness and conformation. 

It will provide a ready market for every class of 
horse bred that are not fast enough for the track. 

The breeder of standard bred horses will have 
a market for the horse that cannot go in 2:40. 

The breeder of draft horses will have a market 
for his horse that fails to go over 1250 pounds in 
weight. 

The breeder of general purpose horses will have 
a ready market for many horses which have been 
considered rather a loss to their breeders, namely, 
the thoroughbred and standard bred and the light 
draft horses. 

All classes of horses will bring early returns and 
can be marketed when in condition without further 
expense of breaking and training. 

The advantage to the community would of course 
be in providing these horses and the necessary for- 
age. 

The peculiar advantages California would derive 
from having a remount station located in the cen- 
tral part of the State would be that this station 
would in four years become the source of supply for 
the army in the Philippines as well as the mounted 
troops stationed in its own boundary and the sev- 
eral adjacent States. 

It is also a fact that horses can be raised more 
economically in the west than anywhere else in the 
United States, therefore being able to buy young 
horses cheaper in California the California remount 
station would soon supply the central States instead 
of the Oklahoma remount station shipping to Cali- 
fornia. 

It is a recognized fact in army circles that the 
western horse is superior to the eastern horse in 
endurance and substance. 

o 

DENVER'S HORSE SHOW. 



The National Western Stock Show, which will open 
in Denver on January 8th, continuing until Janu- 
ary 15th, has become one of the big stock shows of 
the country. Last year the association in charge of 
this show completed a new amphitheater seating 
about 10,000 people and costing $200,000. A number 
of additional barns have been built this year to 
accommodate the increased attendance expected in 
the way of exhibits. Entries have been made already 
from Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Illinois. 
Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Kansas, Ne- 
braska, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Idaho, 
Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota. Some of the 
very best herds of pure bred cattle in the country 
will be represented at the show, and such well- 
known importers of fine horses as I. Crouch & Son 
from Indiana, McLaughlin Brothers of Ohio, North & 
Robinson of Nebraska, Graham Brothers of Ontario. 
Canada, and many others are arranging to exhibit at 
this show. 

At the coming show there will be launched for the 
first time the first exhibition of the National Western 
Horse Show, and some of the best stables in the 
country are arranging to be shown. Kansas City, 
St. Joseph, Chicago, Omaha and other Eastern points 
are sending horses to this exhibition which will pre- 
sent a fine program during the show week. 

During the week while the stock show is open 
there will be held the annual convention of the 
American National Livestock Association and the 
First Congress of the American Beef Producers' 
Association. The peculiar condition at present exist- 
ing in regard to livestock production will result in a 
large crowd of stockmen gathering at Denver for the 
purpose of comparing notes and finding out whero 
-they are at. It is expected that a special train of 
stockmen from Chicago and vicinity will leave for 
the show about January 8th. 

The National Wool Growers' Association is holding 
its convention in Ogden, Utah, the week prior to the 
Denver show, and a large number of sheep on 
exhibition there will be sent by special train to 
enter in the Denver show the following week. About 
$25,000 in premiums will be distributed and the show 
a( Denver will present a number of novel features. 

The exhibit of feeder cattle will be the largest 
ever seen in the world, comprising several hundred 
carloads, and these will be sold at public sale after 
they have been judged. 

The big beef associations will hold public sales of 



selected individuals during the week of the show for 
the purpose of getting representative breeding stock 
of the different breeds into the hands of the new 
Western farmers. 

It is now generally recognized that any increase in 
beef production must come from the intermountain 
section of the West, and livestock interests generally 
are taking advantage of the Denver show to push 
matters in this regard. — Rider and Driver. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



Henry Rohner — Palite is standard and registered. 
His number is 45062. He was foaled in 19(13, is by 
Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, dam Palita (2) 2:16. dam of 
two, by Palo Alto 2:08%, second dam Elsie dam of 
five by Geo. Benton, third dam Elaine 2:20, dam of 
four by Messenger Duroc, fourth dam Green Moun- 
tain .Maid, dam of nine, and also dam of Electioneer, 
by Harry Clay 45. 

HORSES NOT BEING ELIMINATED. 



That the automobile is making any material degree 
of progress in the process of eliminating the horse 
is emphatically denied by the records of vehicle 
construction during the past year, which are found 
in the address of W. H. Mclntyre, of Auburn, Ind., 
at the annual meeting of the Carriage Builders' Na- 
tional Association, recently held at Washington, D. C. 
After admitting the fact that some branches, grades 
and styles of horse-drawn vehicles have suffered 
by the advent of the automobile, Mr. Mclntyre went 
on to state the significant fact that 1,500,000 horse- 
drawn spring vehicles were manufactured in the 
United States during the present year, and added: 
"The number of automobiles built in 1909 is esti- 
mated at 90,000, and the whole number of those in 
running condition in the United States is probably 
not more than 175,000. In 1897 there were 13,500,000 
horses in the country, and their average value was 
$37 each. Ten years later the number of horses 
had increased to 20,600,000, with an average value of 
$95 each, and today there are 23,648,000 horses, to- 
gether with 4,240,000 mules, in this country, and the 
number of horse-drawn vehicles built this year is 20 
per cent greater than in 1908." 

The class of vehicles alluded to as having been 
affected by the auto are undoubtedly those designed 
for the road driver. It is everywhere conceded that 
road driving on public thoroughfares has almost be- 
come obsolete in many sections on account of the 
increase of the automobiles. The prophets of t In- 
horseless age may take what satisfaction they can 
derive out of this phase of the situation, but as a 
matter of fact it is in no degree an indication of the 
decline of the popular interest in the road horse. 
There is unquestionably just as much sentiment be- 
hind the horse and as much fascination in driving 
one on a fine road as ever, but the automobiles, with 
their devastation of the highways, their noise, smell 
and dirt, not to speak of their menace to the safety 
of the man behind the horse, have robbed that 
diversion of the pleasure it once afforded. There is 
no longer room for the horse on the road, but for the 
speedway, the matinee and the race track his popu- 
larity was never greater, and it is steadily increasing. 
— Trotter and Pacer. 

o 

THINGS WORTH KNOWING. 

A horse not receiving any work or regular exer- 
cise, should be watered at least three times a day. 
The more work the more frequent he should be al- 
lowd to drink. 

Avoid the feeding of sour bran of any kind, as it 
causes a disorder of the stomach and intestines and 
may result seriously. 

Ground grain feed goes farther and gives better 
results than fed whole, as there is less waste and 
the food is more easily digested. 

Quite a few horses are subject to bolting their 
food or eating ravenously and this grave fault can 
be greatly remedied by mixing their grain rations 
with cut hay or fodder. 

Never change the food of a horse suddenly as it 
has a tendency to sicken him, although in many in- 
stances his condition is not noticed by the casual 
observer. The change should be made gradually. 

In purchasing a horse be particular in selecting 
one possessed of a deep, broad chest, as it invariably 
is a signification of the fact that the most vital organs 
of the body, the lungs and heart are well developed, 
and consquently is a sign that he has a strong con- 
stitution. 

Carrots fed in limited quantities are quite benefi- 
cial as they improve the appetite, regulate the action 
of both the kidneys and bowels, in addition to making 
the skin healthy and the hair smooth and glossy. 

Interference, is in the majority of cases, due to 
faulty conformation, horses with narrow chests or 
hips, or those with fetlock joints close together, 
causing them to toe out, are as a general thing, sub- 
ject to it. It is also often caused by defective shoe- 
ing, allowing the feet to grow too long, or as a result 
of weakness, due to exhaustion or sickness. 

The normal pulse of a healthy horse, varies accord- 
ing to sex. In that of a stallion, it averages from 
28 to 32 beats to a minute, in a gelding. 33 to 38, 
and in a mare, 34 to 40; the younger they are, the 
more rapid the beats, foals about a month old will 
run about 80 to 90 in a minute. 

Hal B. Jr. that won the first race of the winter 
season over the ice at Toronto, Canada, is by Hal 
B. 2:04% and considered to be a 2:10 pacer when 
he strikes the dirt tracks in the summer. I lis record 
now is 2:25. 



s 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 8, 1910. 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL 




CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT 




COMING EVENTS. 



Bench Shown. 

Jan. 18-20, 1910 — North Dakota Kennel Association. 

(License.) Fargo, No. Dak. W. R. Jenney, Sec'y. 
Jan. 20-21 — Lynn Kennel Club. Lynn, Mass. M. J. 

Donlon, Sec'y. 
Jan. 26-29 — Cleveland Fanciers' Club Company. (Li- 
censed.) Cleveland, O. J. T. Conkey. Sec'y. 
Feb. 8-11 — Fanciers' Association of In liana. In- 
dianapolis, Ind. C. R. Millhouse, Sec'y. Entries 

close Feb. 1. 
Feb. 9-12 — Westminster Kennel Club. New York 

City. Wm. Rauch, Chairman. 
Feb. 22-25 — New England Kennel Club, Boston. Chas. 

W. Taylor Jr., Sec'y. 
March 1-3 — Pine Tree Kennel Club. Portland, Me. 

Elinor S. Moody, Sec'y. 
March 1-4 — Buffalo Kennel Club. Buffalo, N. Y. 

Seymour P. White, Sec'y. 
March 2-4 — Central New York Kennel Association. 

Utica, N. Y. Thos. S. Jackson, Sec'y. 
March 8-11— Erie Kennel Club. Erie, Pa. Lyman 

T. Whitehead, Sec'y. 
March 16-19 — Duquesne Kennel Club of Western 

Pennsylvania. Pittsburg, Pa. B. Cummings, 

Sec'y. 

March 23-26 — Kodak City Kennel Club. Rochester 

N. Y. Jos. H. Church, Sec'y. 
March 21-24 — Chicago Kennel Club. Chicago, 111. F. 

A. Fisher, Sec'y. 
June 1-2 — Ladies' Kennel Association of America. 

Minneola, L L, N. Y. Mrs. R. C. W. Wadsworth, 

Sec'y. , 

June 2-3 — Long Island Kennel Club. . 

E. H. Berendsohn, Sec'y. 
June 8 — Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts. 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. Mrs. H. M. Talbot, Sec'v. 
June 18 — Westchester Kennel Club. r . 

Louis Contoit, Sec'y. 

Field Trial*. 

Jan. 3, 1910— Eastern Field Trial Club. Cotton Plant, 
Miss. S. C. Bradley, Sec'y. 

Jan. 10 — Louisiana Field Trial and Kennel Associa- 
tion. . Arthur W. Van Pelt, Sec'y. 

Jan. 11 — United States Field Trial Club. Rogers 
Springs, Tenn. W. B. Stafford, Sec'y. Grand Junc- 
tion, Tenn. 

Jan. — National Championship Field Trial Associa- 
tion. To follow IT. S. trials. Rogers Springs, Tenn. 
W. B. Stafford Sec'y. Grand Junction, Tenn. 

Jan. 24 — Pacific Coast Field Trials Club, Bakersfleld. 
Cal. E. Courtney Ford, Sec'y. San Francisco, Cal. 

Tan. 26 — North Texas Field Trial Association. Fort 
Worth, Tex. C. T. Hodge. Sec'y. 

Feb. 1 — Lone Star Field Trial Club. San Antonio, Tex. 
E. M. Ford, Sec'y. 

A DEPUTY GAME WARDEN'S REPORT. 



In a recent report of the State Fish and Game Com- 
mission, reference is made to the fact that nearly 
100 employees, mostly deputies, are on the pay roll. 
What the majority of the deputies, particularly the 
field deputies, are doing is not generally known by 
the public at large. The Board itself, is of course, 
in close touch with the various assistants. This in- 
formation is derived from weekly reports filed. 

The report given below is a fair sample of what 
is going on in certain lines of work and should be of 
some little interest to sportsmen. This report was 
sent from San Andreas, Calaveras county and cov- 
ers a trip during the last week of December, and 
speaks for itself. 

In many parts of the State there is now an ob- 
servance of and upholding of the fish and game laws 
whore heretofore the statutes were regarded as of 
little importance. The report follows: 

"In obedience to your orders, I herewith transmit 
my daily report for the week ending Friday, De- 
cember 31st, 1909. 

With headquarters at San Andreas, I made several 
trips to different places in the county, Angels, Mokel- 
umne Hill, Valley Spring, and scouted in the vicinity 
of El Dorado. I was also at Jackson, Amador County. 
I called to see the game warden at Jackson, but he 
was out of town. I wanted to see him about parties 
running deer with dogs in that county. For this 
work I have not made any charge for expenses. 

A few days before Christmas I was informed that 
several students from Berkeley were expected to 
visit this county during the holidays, and that they 
were going on a deer hunt. Following is a report of 
my trip: 

Monday, Dec. 27. — Left San Andreas at 8:30 p. m. 
with AL Smith as assistant, in a light spring wagon. 
Tuesday at 2:30 p. m. we stopped at a cabin, five 
miles northwest of Sheep Ranch, on the head of 
Jesus Maria creek. This location put us beyond the 
possibility of being seen by any one on the road. 
It was fortunate for us that there was a stove in the 
cabin, for it was bitter cold — snow on the ground and 
freezing weather. 

Tuesday, Dec. 28. — With saddle horses we started 
for Assessor Nuner's place, east of Blue mountain, 
in Sec. 28, T. 6 N. R., 15 E. We encountered a foot 
of snow before we reached camp at 2:30 p. m. After 
resting our horses and having dinner, we rode to the 
Buck ranch, four miles east of camp. With the 
aid of an acetylene lamp we returned to camp at 
8 p. m. There had been no one in there during the 
last storm. On the Little Mokelumne, before reach- 
ing the Nuner camp that day, we saw where a horse 
had been ridden down to the river and back. It is 
very likely that the rider had been through there 
after deer. I do not think he got any. 

Wednesday, Dec. 28th. — We started early and in 
going over the northeast end of Blue mountain we 
found the snow over a foot deep. At the forks of the 
road leading to the Albert Solinsky place, we found 
wagon tracks in the snow, and I am informed that 



the young man intends to remain in there this 
winter. He has taken up a homestead and has 
taken in provisions. From the tracks seen in the 
Know there must have been some one hunting in 
that vicinity and stopping at the Solinsky cabin. 
This was likely done during the young man's ab- 
sence. I understand that Mr. Solinsky will return 
to his place after the holidays. We next went to 
the Hickenbotham place, where there is a good house 
and barn, but no provisions or bedding. There were 
footprints in the snow as if there had been some 
bunting in this vicinity. We next came to the Crud- 
son shake camp, where we saw wagon tracks. Some 
one had evidently been in there, for we found a few 
pieces of deer meat in front of the cabin. It is an 
old shack and no one has lived there for years. 
About 3 p. m. we came upon a buckboard standing 
beside the road, a horse being tied to it. We got 
in a thicket of pines, and while we were tying our 
horses, a young man came towards us carrying a 
Winchester rifle. As he approached us, I stepped 
out from behind a tree, and as I did, he remarked, 
"Well, Getchell, are you after us?" Excuse me, but 
who are you, I replied. "I am Alex Smith's brother,'' 
(Deputy County Clerk). "Well, Mr. Smith, have a 
smile with us and we will then go to the wagon and 
wait for Alex to bring in a buck." We did not have 
to wait, for as we turned to go to the wagon, the 
young deputy and Bert Wilson, an ex-member of the 
board of education, came in sight. The boys were 
almost fagged out. Wilson thought .he was going to 
be arrested because he was caught hunting. The 
young man turned pale and said, "This is the first 
time I was ever hunting deer in my life and I have 
to run against a game warden. This is the last for 
me, boys." After a friendly "jolt" all round, we 
spread our lunch, but poor Wilson could not eat, 
for he thought his time had come. And not until 
the boys started for home, and we bade them "good 
day," did they breathe easy. The two Smith boys 
were pretty badly broken up also. Alex Smith claims 
he has killed only four deer and his brother six in 
their time. We camped at the Porter Bros, place 
for the night. 

Thursday, Dec. 30. — We rode east for about ten 
miles, where we found an old cabin with some provis- 
ions stowed away, possibly for some hunter's use this 
winter. Through rain and snow, brush, over logs, 
mountains, and across deep gullies and swollen 
streams, we finally found our way back to the Crud- 
son camp, where we had been the day before. We 
arrived at the Nuner camp late in the afternoon, wet 
and hungry, after a hard day's travel. 

Friday, Dec. 31. — It rained hard Thursday night 
and commenced to snow at 9 a. m., Friday. We 
started for home about 9:30 a. m. The Mokelumne 
river was so high that we had to cross on a log and 
lead our horses across with a long rope. One horse 
came near going down stream. We arrived at our 
wagon at 2:30 in the afternoon, and after partially 
drying our clothes, we came to El Dorado, put our 
horses up and had supper. Left here at 9:30 and 
arrived home at 12 o'clock, midnight. It rained 
or snowed all day Friday. Our snow shoes arrived 
from the East today." 

o 

Pier Fishing Down South.— It would be difficult to 
exaggerate the excitement occasioned at the Long 
Beach pier on Friday of last week by the sudden 
and unexpected visit to those waters of immense 
schools of herring, croaker and pompano. Early vis- 
itors to the pier were surprised to find that their hooks 
remained idle only a second after being thrown into 
the water. The good news spread and by 10 o'clock 
the west side of the lower deck of the pier and also 
the guard-rail around the outer wharf were crowded 
with anglers. 

From then on until nightfall the fish continued to 
bite, and around the feet of each fisherman or fisher- 
woman a pile grew at a remarkable rate. Visitors 
to the outer wharf had to step high and carefully, 
if they went along the west promenade of the lower 
deck to avoid stepping upon the catches. Croaker 
and herring were the fish caught with rod and line. 
Big catches of pompano were made with nets. 



Truckee River Preserve.— It is reported that Wil- 
son & Lindsay, an Oakland firm, have secured ex- 
clusive control of the Truckee river and banks on 
both sides from Truckee to Lake Tahoe, a distance 
of fourteen miles and intend to subdivide the land 
into tracts to be sold to anglers. If such action is 
taken it will probably result in preserving the 
stream as a trout-fishing haunt, and with proper 
precautions will undoubtedly help in saving the fish 
from early depletion. 



Big Eagle Trapped. — James Bartlett of Round 
Mountain, Shasta county, set a trap for coyotes and 
caught a monster gray eagle of rare beauty. The 
bird was caught by one foot, and was caged alive. 
The eagle weighs 18 pounds and measures seven feet 
from tip to tip. Bartlett has shipped the captive to 
an aviary in San Francisco. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



NEW BADGES FOR DEPUTY FISH AND GAME 
COMMISSIONERS. 



New badges for its assistants, recently adopted by 
the Board of Fish and Game Commissioners, are 
being distributed as rapidly as the old badges can be 
called in. 

The new badge for regular deputies is a six-pointed 
nickel-plated star, with small rounded points, and 
bears the legend, "Deputy Fish and Game Commis- 
sioner." The star badge will be worn by all regu- 
larly appointed assistants who draw a salary, and 
takes the place of the small shield with the same 
inscription. 

The special badge, a nickel-plated shield with a 
small five-pointed star in a circle cut out of the metal, 
has been provided for special assistants. It also 
bears the inscription, "Deputy Fish and Game Com- 
missioner." On the small star in the center of the 
shield the number "1910" is stamped, indicating the 
term for which the badge is issued. Special assist- 
ants serve for one year and must qualify for re-ap- 
pointment each year. This badge will be worn by all 
assistants who do not serve under regular salary, 
such, for instance, as citizens in remote districts who 
give only part of their time to the work and receive 
compensation for merely the time employed in the 
State's service. 

The style of the shields formerly worn by regular 
assistants had not been changed for several years, 
and the Commission had experienced considerable dif- 
ficulty from persons professing to be game wardens 
who wore badges similar to the old shields. The 
new badges were made to render counterfeiting more 
difficult. 

In addition to the issuance of new stars and 
badges, the commission has issued an order that 
each special assistant should file a report of his 
official duties at the end of each month on blanks 
furnished for that purpose. Failure to file regularly 
this report will result in a revocation of the assist- 
ant's authority. It became necessary to establish this 
rule because of the fact that a great many officers 
had failed to keep in communication with the Board, 
with a resultant ignorance of the officers' where- 
abouts and activity and a lack of close information 
as to the fish and game interests of their particular 
section. 

o 

DUCKS "DOPED" AND SLAIN WHOLESALE. 

What is believed to be a plan for the wholesale 
slaughter of ducks by market hunters about the lake 
is being gradually uncovered, states the Visalia 
Times. 

It has been a matter of much remark that hun- 
dreds of birds shipped into San Francisco bear no 
evidence of shooting and in fact there is nothing to 
indicate the method by which they were killed. This 
fact has led to suspicion that the birds were poisoned, 
but the fact that so far as known none of the con- 
sumers of these wild fowl, have been affected by eat- 
ing the meat, still leaves the matter in doubt. 

Now, it is believed, the birds were "doped" and, 
while in a state of stupor, are caught and killed. 
It is thought that market hunters are putting out 
wheat or other substance soaked in alcohol. The 
birds feeding at night become drunken and early in 
the morning when the hunters sally forth, are lying 
about in a state of intoxication. They are promptly 
knocked on the head and sacked. 

Another story is that wood alcohol or other sub- 
stance more poisonous than ordinary alcohol, is used 
and that the drawing of the crops prevents the meat 
from becoming inoculated with the poison. This, 
however, is not generally believed. 

The fact that ducks are being shipped to San Fran- 
cisco and other places in large numbers is attract- 
ing attention of game wardens and evidence of the 
methods employed may soon be obtained. 

Of the 100 ducks confiscated in Visalia recently and 
distributed to the hospital, sanitarium and Salvation 
Army, all, so far as examined, bore the marks of 
shot. 

o 

Petaluma Gun Club Organized. — An innovation in 
the regular order of things is the recent organization 
of a combined "gun and social" club. 

A number of the young men of Wilson district 
have formed a new gun and social club. The mem- 
bers met and organized what will be known as the 
Electric Gun Club. The club starts with a mem- 
bership of fourteen. The officers are: President, 
T. P. Joseph; vice-president, C. Witt; secretary, F. 
Harvey, treasurer, Joseph Paula; directors, J. F. 
Paula, W. Wedel, Tony Silva. 

The club has leased preserves on the ranch of M. 
A. Paula and also on the Mecham property from 
Mrs. E. Cantel in Liberty district. 

The Midnight Social Club is the social division 
of the gun club. The new organization will give 
social dances throughout the winter season. 



Cougars Like Dog Meat. — A recent report from Ban- 
ning states that Jim Webster, a rancher of the San 
Bernardino mountains northwest of Banning, se- 
cured a fine specimen of big game by perseverence 
and good marksmanship. He had been pestered by a 
mountain lion for several months and had sacrificed 
several calves and a goat to the appetite of the 
beast. Time and again he loaded his rifle and lay 
in wait for the lion. Finally it came, aroused the 
family dog, seized the canine by the nape of the 
neck and started off into the woods. Then the 
rancher fired and the lion dropped the dog. A few 
hours later the dead body of the beast was found 
lying in a gully 100 yards from the house. This lion 
measured nine feet from tip to tip. 



Saturday, January 8, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



SOUTHERN WATERS MECCA OF SEA ANGLERS. 

The event of the 1909 salt water fishing in South- 
ern California was the return of the leaping tuna 
after an absence of several years. They made their 
appearance in Catalina waters in June, re-appear- 
ing shortly after the middle of August, remaining 
about forty days. During this period 65 tuna were 
taken, of which 62 weighed over 100 pounds; the 
largest weighed 153 pounds, and the smallest 68; 
average, 118.2 pounds. Some of the fish were 
fought for more than six hours before victory perched 
on the rod of the wearied but indomitable angler. A 
few of the fish were taken in fifteen minutes or less, 
by going after them in a rowboat; the difficulty in 
catching a tuna is vastly lessened by this method, 
and the majority of expert anglers have preferred to 
make the chances more equal by fishing from 
launches. 

Twenty-eight blue buttons were issued by the 
Tuna Club to anglers who caught tuna weighing 
over 100 pounds, many of those who caught tuna 
Jiad already earned their buttons, but the active 
membership of the club received material additions, 
writes C. V. Barton in the Los Angeles Examiner. 

The leaping tuna, or blue tuna, does not leap 
after being hooked. Here his method is the re- 
verse of that of the tarpon. The tuna leaps in play 
and while pursuing flying fish, his favorite food. 
It is the hardest fighting fish in the piscatorial cal- 
endar. The tarpon is more spectacular in its move- 
ment, but it can be caught on nine-ounce tackle, of 
which, so far, the tuna has made kindling wood and 
shoe laces. Some day, by freak or accident a tuna 
will be caught on light tackle, but never as a regular 
thing. Why? Catalina is the only place in the world 
where the tuna, or horse mackerel, has been caught 
at all with rod and reel. Numerous attempts have 
been made, on the Atlantic coast, particularly in 
Nova Scotia waters, to take tuna with rod and 
reel, but so far without success. The Atlantic tuna, 
however, run larger than the average of those taken 
in Catalina waters. 

The reappearance of the leaping tuna has reaf- 
firmed the supremacy of Catalina waters as the best 
fishing resort in the wide world. The theory is that 
the tuna come back to spawn, and that they are 
likely to return for several successive seasons. It 
is supposed that they have gone south for the sea- 
son, and late in November they were seen in large 
numbers just below the Mexican line. 

The mere announcement that the tuna were at 
Catalina was enough to make anglers for large game 
fish prick up their ears all over the United States, 
and also in Great Britain, where the Tuna Club has a 
dozen or so active members. 

There was "Colonel" A. W. Hooper of Boston, an 
old tarpon fisherman and Catalina angler, who vis- 
ited Avalon just before the tuna reappeared in Au- 
gust. Hooper started for his home, and his last 
word to L. G. Murphy, another veteran angler, was 
"If the tuna re-appear, let me know by wire, and I'll 
come back." 

The message caught him two-thirds across the 
continent, and back he came to find new and stren- 
uous experience and to win the coveted blue button. 

Following are the tuna catchers and weight of fish 
for 1909, constituting the Tuna Club's roll of honor 
for the season: 

Weight 

Date Angler. Pounds. 

Aug. 19— A. C. Brode 126 

Aug. 20— L. G. Murphy 118 

Aug. 22— E. G. Judah Ill 

Aug. 23— C. G. Conn 128, 120, 109 

Aug. 23— A. J. Eddy 111V 2 

Aug. 23— A. L. Tyler 117 

Aug. 23 — C. C. Bowerman 110 

Aug. 24— J. L. Kirkpatrick, Dr 138y 2 

Aug. 24— Edward O. Palmer, Dr 112 y 2 

Aug. 24— Wm. N. Hunt, Jr 117 

Aug. 25— E. J. Polkinghorn 113 

Aug. 25— Ross Kirkpatrick, Jr 126 

Aug. 25— C. G. Conn 120 

Aug. 25— Philip S. O'Mara 153 

Aug. 26— C. G. Conn 114 

Aug. 26— Ben Williams 125 

Aug. 28— Roy F. B. Shaver 113% 

Aug. 28— Ben Williams 123% 

Aug. 29— J. A. Coxe 122% 

Aug. 30— C. G. Conn 125 

Aug. 30— C. A. Thomas 118% 

Aug. 30— C. E. Pilsbury, Jr 104'/ 2 

Aug. 30— T. McD. Potter 96 % 

Aug. 30— W. H .Ogburn 102% 

Aug. 30— L. G. Murphy 114 

Aug. 30— W. E. Jones 116 

Aug. 30— B. O. Kendall 120% 

Aug. 30— Ben Williams 109% 

Aug. 31— W. E. Jones 106 

Aug. 31— Smith Warren x98 

Sept. 1— C. G. Conn 112 

Sept. 1— W, E. Jones 123 

Sept. 1— G. E. Pillsbury, Jr 126 

Sept. 2— Smith Warren 100 

Sept. 2 — W. Greer Campbell 120 

Sept. 4— L. P. Streeter \ 136 

Sept. 4— G. F. Pillsbury, Jr 109 

Sept. 5— Eugene Elliott 104 

Sept. 8— Dr. B. O. Coates 123% 

Sept. 11— A. W. Hooper 68 

Sept. 13— C. Irving Wright 108% 

Sept. 13— H. C. Rice 130 

Sept. 14— A. W. Hooper xll7%, 145% 

Sept. 14— L. G. Murphy 108% 

Sept. 14 — Howard Wright 137 

Sept. 14— A. B. Hill or Hitt 121% 



Sept. 14— Henry Wetherby 129 

Sept. 15— A. T. Munn 112 

Sept. 15— Mrs. Philip O'Mara xl35 

Sept. 15— A. W. Hooper 113 

Sept. 15— L. T. Bradford 126% 

Sept. 17— C. G. Conn 113%, 108, 137% 

Sept. 18— A. W. Hooper 122% 

Sept. 18— C. G. Conn 101%, 120%, 125%, 115 

Sept. 22— F. R. Murray 112 

Sept. 23— L. G. Murphy xl60 

x Disqualified; mutilated by shark. Total number 
taken during season, 65. Number over 100 pounds, 
62. Average weight, 113% pounds. Largest, 153 
pounds. Smallest, 69 pounds. Number of blue but- 
tons issued, 28. 

Seven buttons awarded to associate members. 
Three buttons awarded to active members holding 
red buttons. One button awarded to active (elective) 
member. Seventeen buttons awarded to anglers not 
members at time of cafch, but later elected. 

The cups, medals and other annual and perpetual 
trophies of the Tuna Club and the Light Tackle Club 
aggregate over $5000 in value, and make a notable 
display indeed. The club has just inaugurated the 
first annual winter tournament, with suitable prizes, 
so that angling competition in Catalina waters ex- 
tends through eleven months of the year. 

Under the auspices of the Tuna Club are the Light 
Tackle Club and the Three Six Club. The Light 
Tackle Club maintained an independent organization 
for several years, but in 1909 was taken over by the 
Tuna Club. The aims, purposes and competitions 
of the Light Tackle Club will be maintained by the 
Tuna Club. These two organizations have done more 
than any other "For a Higher Development of the 
Art of Sea Angling." 

With the growth of light tackle fishing it was not 
strange that anglers should seek higher degrees of 
expertness, that should not only give the fish a 
greater chance, but add greatly to the satisfaction 
derived from the sport. The first step in this direc- 
tion was the organization by Thomas McD. Potter 
of the Three Six Club, for yellowtail. 

This called for a six-ounce rod, six feet long and 
a six-strand line. Many declared that yellowtail 
could not be caught on such "flimsy tackle, and a 
great deal of missionary work had to be done by 
Mr. Potter two years ago. Now, the supremacy of 
the three-six tackle is firmly established, as is shown 
by the fact that during the season of 1909 no less 
than sixty-six anglers qualified for membership in the 
Three Six Club, by taking yellowtail weighing eigh- 
teen or more pounds. The largest yellowtail taken 
on this tackle is forty-five pounds, by Smith Warren, 
in 1908. Those who have thoroughly tried out the 
three six tackle declare it is really more efficient 
than the heavier nine-ounce tackle. 

But the end was not yet. During the season of 
1909, Roy Shaver, the rod-maker; Edgar Lefebre, 
Smith Warren, Charles Garr, Eugene Elliott and one 
or two other expert enthusiasts began to experiment 
on albacore with "three-four-five" tackle — a three- 
strand line, a four-foot rod weighing five ounces. 
Nearly a dozen anglers have so far qualified by tak- 
ing albacore weighing from eighteen pounds upward 
on this tackle. Where will it stop? 

The Coast anglers are well represented by the 
Southern California Rod and Reel Club, which has 
a membership of over 200, and which takes a very 
active interest in all matters pertaining to the wel- 
fare of angling, especially in the matter of the con- 
servation of game fish. 

Two years ago the club became convinced that 
several varieties of Coast game fish were fast being 
exterminated by indiscriminate seining. For greater 
protection a bill was introduced in the legislature 
three years ago, forbidding the taking of corbina 
(surf fish), spotfin, croaker and yellowfin, except 
with hook and line. This bill was allowed to die 
in committee; but nothing daunted, the club intro- 
duced a similar bill at the last session of the legis- 
lature, and had the satisfaction of seeing it enacted 
into law. 

Several arrests have been made for violations of 
this law, and conviction secured. One of the cases 
has been appealed to the Superior Court, and the 
question of its constitutionality will be thoroughly 
threshed out. The Rod and Reel Club proposes to 
stand back of the law, and to see that it is main- 
tained, unless it should be overthrown by the 
courts, which does not now seem probable. 

The Southern California Rod and Reel Club gives, 
several times a year, barbecues and casting tourna- 
ments, which are largely attended. A strong effort 
is just now being made to create interest in casting 
on the part of anglers generally, and if sufficient 
encouragement is received a tournament of national 
scope will be held during the coming winter. 

The blue tuna is, of course the king of game fish. 
There is no other taken on rod and reel to compare 
with him — none that calls for such prowess or des- 
perate endurance, such good red sporting blood on 
the part of the angler. No man with a yellow streak 
in him, no "quitter" will fight a game fish for, five, 
six or more hours, calling on the last ounce of 
strength and endurance. The tuna Is taken with 
flying fish for bait, trolling from a launch, with about 
150 or 200 feet of the line out. The tuna are usually 
taken on the protected side of Catalina Island any- 
where from Long Point to Seal Rocks, some distance 
out. They are frequently brought to gaff several 
miles distant from the point where the strike was 
made. 

SWORDFISH — The swordflsh or marlin now ranks 
high in the list of game fish of Southern California 
waters. Up to the season of 1909 but a few had 
been taken with rod and reel, but a new record was 



established last season, when no less than nine were 
landed on heavy tackle, as follows: 

Sept. 2, L. P. Streeter, 113 pounds; Sept. 3, L. G. 
Murphy, 141 pounds; Sept. 5. L. G. Murphy, 146; 
Sept. 13, C. G. Conn, 339; Sept. 13, G. W. Haight, 
183; Sept. 13, George E. Pillsbury, Jr., 200; Sept. 18, 
Gifford Pinchot, 180; Sept. 18, Gifford Pinchot, 186. 
Average weight of fish, 183% pounds. 

The monster swordfish taken by C. G. Conn now 
adorns a wall of the Tuna Club reading room. It 
measures 10 feet in length. 

YELLOWFIN TUNA— The Yellowfin tuna, or Jap- 
anese tuna, as it is variously called, though not so 
large as its cousin, the blue tuna, is pound for pound 
a better fighter. Those who have taken both say it 
is a greater feat, or equally meritorious, at least, to 
have taken a yellowfin tuna on light tackle, than a 
blue tuna on heavy tackle. The yellowfin tuna were 
very plentiful in Catalina waters in 1906 and 1907, 
but none was caught in 1908-9, though they were 
seen. They run from 35 to 75 or 80 pounds, and are 
fighters, every inch. 

BLACK SEA BASS— If one wants mere weight for 
his fishing, he can have all the sport he wants, often 
including a lively fight, of from one to three hours, 
figting a black sea bass, or "jewfish." These mon- 
sters run up as high as 500 pounds; the largest 
caught was 436 pounds, by L. G. Murphy. The larg- 
est fish for the season of 1909 was 394 pounds, taken 
by R. G. Baird, of San Francisco. 

YELLOWTAIL — And now we come to the most 
popular game fish of them all, the prince of fighting 
fish, the yellowtail, the privateer of the southern seas. 
More numerous than the tuna, he stays with us longer, 
and is always ready for a scrap. The yellowtail 
runs from 15 to 60 pounds in weight; larger ones 
have been seen, but the biggest ever caught on light 
tackle weighed 60% pounds. It was caught in San 
Clemente waters, which, by the way, earned a repu- 
tation for harboring big yellowtail, and lots of them, 
in 1908, that was not maintained in 1909. This year 
the best fishing was in Catalina waters. Besides 
the voyage to Clemente is more difficult and costly, 
and is often dangerous. Still anglers will go where 
the fish are, and another year may see a San Cle- 
mente revival. 

Yellowtail are taken mostly from May to October, 
though they are caught every month in the year. 
The yellowtail is "foxy"; he fights with his head as 
well as with his tail, and is a worthy foeman of any 
man's rod. 

ALBACORE — The albacore is also cousin to the 
tuna; David Starr Jordan, no less, has said so. 
Not much of a fighter in the point of strength or 
endurance as the blue tuna, or yellowfin tuna, and 
possessing less of the dashing qualities of the yel- 
lowtail, the albacore, with its hypnotic eyes and long, 
saber-like side fins, is distinctly a game fish, afford- 
ing plenty of sport for the light tackle angler. More- 
over, he is in evidence the year around, frequenting 
the channel between the mainland and Catalina 
Island. By going three or four miles out one is rea- 
sonably certain to get a strike from an albacore. 
The albacore is apt to sound; the new hand thinks 
it has started for China; it is brought in by the 
slow process of "pumping," and the angler feels that 
he has. "got a fish" at least, when it is finally gaffed 
and deposited in the fish box. 

The brilliant bonita, smaller but a fighter, and the 
still smaller, erratic "skip-jack," carrying more 
"scrap" for his six or eight or ten pounds than many 
game fish several times his size, must not be omit- 
ted from the list. 

The pike like barracuda, appears in vast schools 
in the summer, but can scarcely be classed as a 
game fish. The barracuda, however, has a reputation 
for breaking up tackle in the hands of inexperienced 
anglers. So has the the skipjack. 

WHITE SEA BASS— The lordly white sea bass, 
running from ten to eighty or a hundred pounds, 
and in far south latitudes much heavier, is great 
sport for the angler. It does not put up as vicious 
a fight as the yellowtail and albacore; it fights more 
on the surface, and is a brilliant prince of the sea. 
The sea bass, one of the most beautiful of large 
game fish, makes its appearance in Catalina waters 
in February or March, and stays until about the 
first of July, though the dates of its going and com- 
ing are movable. There are many anglers who 
would rather catch a white sea bass than a yellow- 
tail; and the white sea bass is, moreover, better eat- 
ing. The record white sea bass for Calalina waters 
weighed 60 pounds. It is more difficult for the inex- 
pert angler to catch a white sea bass than a yellow- 
tail, for the reason that the former bites very dain- 
tily. Even the expert is fortunate if he gets one 
fish in three or four strikes. 

Heretofore we have been considering the big game 
fish of the open seas, the sport of the man with 
money and leisure. But the fisherman who goes out 
of a Sunday, or a Saturday afternoon, also has sport 
and a variety of fish. 

There are, within an hour's ride by trolley from 
Los Angeles, fully twenty different beach and bay 
resorts affording good fishing, each in its class and 
season. With a round trip fare of 50 cents, and so 
little time lost in going and coming, Southern Califor- 
nia is in fact the anglers' paradise. This Is not to 
say that tremendous catches are the rule without 
•exception, for no man can tell what a day's salt 
water fishing may bring forth; but the angler may 
go aflshlng, with the expectation of coming home 
with at least a mess. 

Moreover, there is not a month in the year in 
which there Is no salt water fishing to be had, though 
summer, of course, is the best season. The points 
most accessible for Los Angeles anglers, beginning 



18 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 8, 1910. 



with Balboa, south of Newport, about thirty-eight 
miles distant from Los Angeles, are as follows: 

Balboa, Newport Bay, Newport, Huntington Beach, 
Sunset Beach, Bay City, Anaheim Bay. Alamitos Bay, 
Alamitos, Long Beach, San Pedro Bay, San Pedro 
lireakwater, Redondo, Hermosa, Manhattan, Playa 
del Rey, Venice, Ocean Park, Santa Monica, Port 
Los Angeles (Long Wharf). Besides these, there 
is good fishing all summer from the beach nearly 
everywhere between Port Los Angeles to Newport, 
for those who can stand up under the hard work 
of casting in the surf. Then, too, there is excellent 
surf fishing along the beach south of Newport, along 
the line of the Santa Fe Railway; San Onofre and 
Mateo being the points most frequented. 

The corbina, or surf fish, is at once the gamest and 
the best eating of any game fish caught with rod and 
reel in coast waters. It runs from a quarter of a 
pound up to eight or ten pounds, and is a game 
fighter in every sense of the term. It is a cleanly 
fish, feeding in the surf for sand-crabs and other ma- 
rine insects. 

The yellow fin belongs to the same family (ron- 
cador). While not so good eating, nor so highly 
esteemed for its gameness, the yellowfin is well 
worth the expenditure of any angler's time and 
skill. It runs up to five or six pounds. It strikes 
harder than the corbina, but has not as much endur- 
ance. 

The spot fin croaker is another roncador. It is 
more of a bulldog than the corbina and weighs up to 
ten or twelve pounds; but averages from two or three 
up to five or six pounds. It is not as good eating as 
the corbina and yellowfin, but is a good game fighter. 

Strange to say a smaller fish than any of these 
mentioned also belong to the roncadors. but is not a 
game fish. It is variously called torn cod, kingfish, 
and by the Mexicans, roncador. It comes in schools 
of thousands, feeding on the bottom, and is a nui- 
sance when the angler is after better fish. 

Then there is the China croaker, own cousin 
to the spotfin, livelier, and with a strange paint- 
brush dab of color across the left shoulder. It ranks 
as a game fish. 

The croaker, corbina and yellowfin under the new 
law, can be taken only with hook and line. 

There are several varieties of bass that are good 
eating, that are caught both trolling outside and in 
the bays and along shore, which scarcely rank as 
game fish, but which nevertheless make a great deal 
of sport and grease many a frying pan. 

Then there is the halibut. Many will smile, doubt- 
less, at the idea of calling a halibut a game fish, but 
when it is played on light tackle, the man who lands 
a halibut weighing from ten to thirty pounds has had 
a fight and plenty of sport. 

I have said nothing of the mackerel, the smelt, the 
whitefish, the pompano and other varieties, which, to 
make a successful angler's holiday, they make sport, 
though they do not rank as game fish. 

The trout season runs from May 1 to November 
15, and there are a dozen streams in Southern Califor- 
nia that afford good sport. Last season some were 
caught weighing over five pounds each. The best 
streams are the San Gabriel (West fork, main 
stream. Fish creek and Iron Fork), Sespe river. 
Kern river, Lytle creek, Santa Ana river, Matilija 
river, Ventura river. The San Gabriel is the most 
frequented because of its nearness to Los Angeles. 
All the streams are regularly stocked with trout, and 
there is no danger that they will be fished out, 
though of course the sport varies at times. 

o 

HUNTING AND FISHING NOTES. 



The local duck hunting sportsmen have, for the 
past week, had rather indifferent results at many 
shooting resorts. In most of the bay counties 
marshes, the preserves have been flooded for two 
or more weeks. This coupled with the recent rains 
have scattered the birds far and wide. 

The continued spell of very cold weather has also 
interfered with the sport. Midweek shooters on the 
Suisun marsh this week had the unusual experience 
of finding ponds frozen over with an inch thick 
layer of ice. 

Most of the large ducks have taken wing for 
southern and more congenial feeding ground. Dur- 
ing the past week canvasback and bluebill ducks 
have been seen, in various parts of the bays, in flocks 
of thousands upon thousands. Last Thursday pas- 
sengers on a bay shore train saw off San Bruno and 
close to shore a flock of these birds over a mile in 
length. It is doubtful now if there will be much, 
or any, improvement in local duck hunting before 
the season closes next month. 

Black sea brant, canvasback, bluebills and widgeon 
have been rather plentiful in and about Tomales bay. 
Drake's bay and Limantour bay, Marin county. 



Steelhead angling in Russian river near Duncan's 
Mills has been excellent nearly all the past week. 
There has been a large delegation of local anglers 
on the river and safe to say the invasion for the 
week end and tomorrow's fishing will be a record 
one. The fish taken are in prime condition, ranging 
from a few pounds up to 15 pounds in weight. 



Several net fishermen were recently arrested for- 
illegal seining of steelhead in Russian river. The 
men were taken before a justice of the peace and 
the nets seized. Habeas corpus proceedings gave the 
culprits temporary liberty and, it is reported the nets 
were returned to the delinquents. The taking of 
steelhead trout with nets is prohibited by State laws, 
fishing with nets in the streams of Sonoma county 
is prohibited by a county ordinance. Where the 



justice of the peace found precedent for his ruling 
is a problem. 

Following the arrests, seemingly in wanton retailia- 
tion, the nets of Breidenstein and Wells were 
despoiled and the fish captured legally were stolen, 
by at present unknown vandals. 



A few small steelhead were caught in the Point 
Reyes tidewaters last Sunday. At Salmon creek, in 
Sonoma county, nine miles from Bodega, the steel- 
head fishing has been first class. 



The few veterans who braved the cold weather 
for a day's striped bass fishing at Wingo or San 
Antone for a week past, had non-visible returns for 
their efforts. The slough waters are rather more 
fresh than salt at present and alive with catfish. 



Sometimes duck hunters vary their outing day's 
sport by fishing. "Shorty" Hartline, a member of the 
Thousand Acre Gun Club of Suisun, recently cap- 
tured a seven and a half foot sturgeon that weighed 
136 pounds. Years ago this fish would not have 
been considered of a phenomenal size, but nowa- 
days it would not be hard to get a bet down that so 
large a sturgeon was not to be found in our waters. 
o 

SMALL BORE GUNS. 



The ever-increasing demand for small-bore guns, 
particularly of 20 gauge, having reached such un- 
looked-for proportions, we are setting forth this cir- 
cular letter, thinking it may prove of sufficient in- 
terest to warrant its perusal by those contemplat- 
ing the purchase of the now deservedly popular and 
efficient little guns; and while it is not intended to 
detract from the inherent power and acknowledged 
superiority of the larger gauges, yet, under certain 
conditions, and in some kinds of shooting, these 
smaller calibers can in all fairness be said to easily 
hold their own, possessing as they undoubtedly do, 
some attractive features that must recommend them 
to the favorable notice of progressive sportsmen. 

It is generally believed that a 20 gauge is a very- 
close shooter, and that none but the best shots can 
ever hope to shoot well with them. This is an er- 
ror, as a 20 gauge, when properly bored, can be made 
to cover a 30-inch circle at 25 yards when so desired, 
and when we consider that the normal charge of % 
of an ounce of No. 8 or No. 9 shot can be made to 
do this, we certainly cannot find much room for 
complaint. On the other hand, a 20 can be so 
choked that at 40 yards it will account for 65 per 
cent of its charge in the same circle, even when 
loaded with full charges of 2% drams bulk nitro 
powder and % of an ounce of shot. 

It is quite apparent therefore that the gauge of the 
gun does not operate against the shooter by handi- 
capping him in his shooting, because by having his 
20 built and bored according to his special require- 
ments, he can be supplied with a most useful and 
highly serviceable weapon, whether he use it at 
quail when shooting from 15 to 25 yards, or at snipe 
up to 40 yards, although of course no gun, whatever 
its caliber, can be expected to do its best work at 
minimum and maximum ranges; so to be prepared 
for any emergency, either two pairs of barrels have 
to be used, or else an all-around gun with one barrel 
cylinder and the other full choke, will be found to 
answer almost any purpose. 

A very light gun of its gauge can never be recom- 
mended because if loaded to the full capacity of its 
calibre, it is sure to give a great deal of recoil, al- 
ways disastrous to good and consistent shooting, and 
generally accountable for more bad shooting than all 
other causes combined. These remarks apply to 
guns of all calibres, so allowing this to be a fact, we 
will place the 20 gauge required for actual service at 
between 5% to 5% pounds as its minimum weight, 
and if it is to be used with 2M> drams bulk nitro 
powder and % ounces shot, then 6 to 6% pounds 
will always make a more pleasant one to shoot, and 
still be light enough to be carried day in, day out, 
without discomfort or undue fatigue. 

Coming to the all important part, as a game 
killer, a most thorough test made over the chrono- 
graph shows that the 20 holds its own very well as 
compared with the standard 12. as these figures will 
prove: 12 gauge Parker gun, 37 grains Dupont, 1% 
oz. No. 7 — 921 feet; 20 gauge Parker gun, 32 grains 
Dupont, % oz. No. 7—941 feet. 

These records were taken over a 100 foot range, 
and as both are standard game loads the comparison 
can be regarded as a fair one, with the advantage 
slightly on the 20 bore side of the ledger. 

Regarding the length of barrels a 20 should have, 
that is merely a matter of individual choice, just 
as it is with guns of other gauges, but the great pre- 
ponderance of opinion leans towards 28 inches when 
most of the shooting is to be done in thickets and 
cover, and applies particularly to quail, woodcock 
and ruffed grouse shooting. If on the other hand 
the gun is to be used principally on open prairies or 
marshes, at duck or grouse, or in fact any kind of 
game that is shot at in an open country, then 30 or 
even 32-inch barrels, full choke, regulated to shoot 
close as possible and chambered for long shells, 
should be used, for while a long barreled gun may 
not outshoot a shorter one to any marked degree, 
yet there is positively no doubt but what the former 
can be aligned much more accurately, more especially 
at long range where most of the above kind of shoot- 
ing is generally done. 

It may lie said that when first the small bore 
Parkers were introduced, many looked upon them 
with distrust and suspicion. These handy little 20 
bores are fast becoming more universally used as 



their intrinsic value is better understood, and it is 
with the utmost confidence that we recommend them 
for all kinds of upland game shooting, basing our 
recommendation on a wide range of many years' ex- 
perience in gun-making backed by volumes of vol- 
untary and unsolicited testimonials coming from our 
patrons whose words of unstinted praise have 
strengthened our own convictions that the term 
"Old Reliable" is just as applicable to our 20 bores 
as it is, and always has been, to our guns of larger 
gauge. 

A BUSINESS CHANGE. 



Mr. Hip Justins, Pacific Coast sales manager for 
the Remington Arms Company and the Union Metal- 
lic Cartridge Company for several years past ten- 
dered his resignation, which took effect on Janu- 
ary 1st. 

Mr. F. B. Clarke, long identified with the corpora- 
tions mentioned, will be in temporary charge of the 
local office until January 15th, when Mr. J. G. Heath 
will take charge. 

Mr. Heath for the past five or six years has covered 
a number of States in the middle and southwest 
and is thoroughly posted in every detail of the busi- 
ness. He is known directly and indirectly to Coast 
trade and to many of our sportsmen, from whom 
we doubt not he will receive a genuine California 
welcome. 

Mr. Clarke, during his temporary sojourn in this 
city, has made many friends, he is a gentleman of 
pleasing personality and evidently en rapport with 
Coast business conditions. 

Of Mr. Justins, who had decided some time ago to 
to embark in business fcr himself, we feel impelled 
to state, that he was a host of friends in the trade 
and among the sportsmen of the Coast. At what- 
ever point he presented himself for years past he in- 
variably became popular. A sportsman of warm im- 
pulses we wish him every success in his new venture, 
which sentiment we doubt not but will be endorsed 
by his many sportsman friends. 

The local office of M. Hartley Co. and the Rem- 
ington Arms Company is now at 604-5 Schmidt 
Dividing, 12 Geary street, San Francisco. 

o 

Peters Points. 

At Penargyle, Pa., December 1st, Messrs. L. R. 
Lewis and Neaf Apgar won second and third pro- 
fessional averages respectively scoring 152 and 150 
out" of 40, both using Peters factory loaded shells. 

At Milwaukee, December 5th, J. M. Hughes using 
Peters shells tied for high general average, 136 out 
of 150. 

At Trenton, N. J., December 4th, Sim Glover was 
high professional, 153 out of 175 and Mr. Neaf Apgar 
second, with 152, both using Peters factory loaded 
shells. 

At the live bird shoot of the Cincinnati Gun Club, 
December 8th, Mr. E. Hammerschmitt tied for high 
average shooting from the 30-yard line. He used 
Peters factory loaded Ideal shells and killed 38 out 
of 40 with two dead out of bounds. 

On the following day, December 9th, at the North- 
ern Kentucky Gun Club, Mr. O. J. Holaday made 
quite a remarkable record. A novelty was provided 
in an event of five pairs of live birds. Mr. Holaday 
was high gun with 8 out of 10, shooting Peters 
factory loaded Ideal shells, and an ordinary trap load 
at that. 



Winchester Wins. 

All averages, both professional and amateur, were 
won by shooters shooting Winchester shells at the 
tournament of the Rising Sun Gun Club, December 
1-2; also the Cecil County Championship. The win- 
ning professionals were as follows: L. S. German, 
303. H. L. Worthington, 294; H. S. Welles. 288 out 
of 315. Amateurs: L. Towner, 279; J. W. Ewing, 276; 
J. S. Gifford, 263. Mr. Ewing also won the Cecil 
County Championship with 44 out of 50 and 25 
straight on the shoot-off, using a Winchester gun. 

H. J. Borden was high man at St. James. Mo., De- 
cember 4th, scoring the very high total of 248 out 
of 250 targets with Winchester shells and gun. Mr. 
Hartwell, who was high amateur, also shot Win- 
chester shells. 

High amateur at Milwaukee, December 5th, was 
J. F. Wulf, who scored 129 out of 150 with Winches- 
ter shells. 

Frank Gray was high amateur at Eldorado, Kan., 
with 157 out of 175, shooting repeater shells. Ed 
O'Brien, who was high professional, and J. W. Gil- 
lespie, who was second, both shot Winchester shells 
and guns. 



Rod and Reel Club. — The casting committee of the 
Southern California Rod and Reel Club is actively 
engaged at the present time in arranging the prelim- 
inaries for the next casting tournament to be held 
in Los Angeles some time during next February. It 
is proposed to make this meet exceed anything ever 
before attempted both in the number of events and 
entries. A handsome diamond medal will be one 
of the many prizes to be distributed at the meet. 

Other experts can also give a good accounting of 
many large bass from San Antone, Professor Mc- 
Farland, W. S. Kittle, Al M. Cummings, Parson Jack- 
son, "Emperor" Hillegrass, Howard Vernon and a 
few more could help to pile up the avoirdupois in 
the bass line. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January 8, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 




As long as oats and corn are the 
leading grain rations for horses there 
will always be a difference of opinion 
to the relative merits of each grain. It 
has been contended that oats, on ac- 
count of their nitrogenous elements 
essential to build up bone and muscle, 
are the better adapted to all classes of 
horses than corn, which is rich in car- 
bohydrates or fat building attributes. 
A test was made for forty-eight weeks 
by feeding one horse oats and the 
other member of the pair corn, the 
oats being charged to the expense ac- 
count at thirty cents a bushel and 
corn at forty cents a bushel. When 
mixed timothy and alfalfa hay were 
fed it was found that corn was as 
efficient as oats by weight in maintain- 
ing the horses in prime condition and 
that corn was a more economical ra- 
tion than oats and fed in the ear was 
preferable to feeding shelled. 
o 

Not only should hogs have salt reg- 
ularly but if they do not care for it 
induce them to eat it. This requires 
particular care to see that they do 
not gorge themselves. Having the 
pigs consume considerable salt will 
prevent constipation, induce them to 
drink more water and tone their 
bodies. Sulphur is a blood purifier 
and more of it may be fed to hogs than 
is done. Some feeders mix flour of 
sulphur at the rate of a tablespoonful 
to a quart of salt and combine it with 
the slop or mash and this is about the 
handiest way to put it out. Char- 
coal or burnt corncobs should always 
be available. 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAULT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure for 

Curb, Splint, Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumors. Cures all skin 
diseases or Parasites, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
Removes all Bunches from Horses or 
Cattle. 

As a HUMAN KGMEDT tor Rhen- 
matlim, Nprulai, Sore Throut, et.., it 
is invaluable. 

Every bottle of Cailatlc Italian! sold Is 
Warranted to (rive satisfaction. Price 5(1 1 .50 
per bottle Sold by drufrtrists. or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for its 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Address 

IH8 UWRlNCE-WIUIiMS C0MP1NT, Cleveland, Obi- 



FOR SALE. 

Josephine, one of the greatest race 
mares in the West. Record 2:07% and 
5 years old. Started in 40 races, win- 
ning first money 18 times, out of money 
only 4 times. She is sound and without 
a blemish. 

Her dam, Lady May, is also for sale; 
is in foal by Zolock, due Feb. 12, 1910. 
Lady May is one of the greatest brood 
mares in California and for family ani- 
mal cannot be excelled. 

Will sell one or both very cheap. 

Address 

W. T. RUSSELL, Highland, Cal. 



The Third Annual Pleasanton Sale 

OF 

STANDARD-BRED 

Trotters and Pacers 



WHICH TAKES PLACE DURING 

THE FIRST WEEK IN MARCH, 1910, 

includes many from such well-known horse breeders as C. L. Crellin, Pleasanton, 
Henry Struve, Watsonville, J. E. Montgomery, Davis, F. A. Hellwig, Alvarado, J. 
C. Armstrong, A. Goulart, Santa Rita, A. Edstrom, Oakland, H. Busing, Pleasan- 
ton, S. B. Van Dervort, Irvington, and many more are making entries. 

It promises to be a big sale. Send for entry blanks at once. 

Remember, all entries will close February 10th. No later! 

If you have a good one and want to sell for the highest price re- 
member this is your best opportunity! 

GOOD HORSES BRING BIG PRICES AT PLEASANTON. 

FRED H. CHASE & CO., Auctioneers, 

478 Valencia St., San Francisco. 



The Emporium Annual White S ales 



through- 



commence Jan. 3rd, and continue 
out the month. Some of the greatest values in 
the Emporium's history in 
LINENS, DOMESTICS, WHITE GOODS, EMBROIDERIES, 
LACES, WAISTS, WOMEN'S and CHILDREN'S DRESSES, 
UNDERMUSLINS, SCARFS, CENTERS and FANCY LINENS. 
The assortments are the largest the Emporium has yet 
offered. The best money's worth always, and every pur- 
chase protected by that fair and liberal Money-Back Policy 
which guarantees satisfaction or money refunded. 




Market St., between 4th and 5th, San Francisco 



Here is an Opportunity to Buy the Standard Trotting Stallion 



FAIRHILLS 



REGISTERED 



42617 



and a splendid collection of choice trotting stock at a very low price. 

FAIRHILLS 42017 was foaled in 1903 at the Palo Alto Stock Farm. He is a 
bright bay in color, stands 15.3 hands and weighs 1180 pounds. He is as hand- 
some as a picture and has the individuality and muscularity that made his sire 
so famous. He is very gentle and thoroughly broke. When a three-year-old 
he war. given to John Phippen, who, in seven weeks, drove him some fast quarters. 
Distemper broke out among the horses at the old San Jose track, so Fairhills 
suffering from a slight attack, was sent to Hopland. The calamity of April 18th 
following, it was not deemed advisable to place him again in training. Mr. Phip- 
pen claims he is one of the purest-gaited, most level-headed trotters he ever 
drove The breeding of this horse should commend him to horsemen. As a foal- 
getter he is absolutely sure, and all the colts and fillies by him are bays in 
color and natural trotters; they know no other gait. 

KAILHILLS was sired bv Mendocino 2:19'/ a (sire of Monte Carlo 2:0<V4, Men- 
Hnlitn 2 07 V, Idolita 2:09y 2 , Claro 2:11%, Leonora 2:12%, Polka Dot 2:14%, and 
8 others' in 2 30), son of Electioneer 125 and Mano (dam of 2 and 2 sires of 16) 
hv Piedmont '2-17: second dam Mamie (dam of 2) by Hambletonian, Jr.; thud 
dam Gilda by Mango, and on to the 14th dam, Old Montague Mare 

FAIRHILLS was out of Mary Osborne <2> 2:2S</ 2 (dam of Dorothea A. 2:29% 
and the dam of May Worthy 2:29%), by Azmoor 2:20% (sire of Moortrix 2:«7'.s. 
Betonica 2 09% Bob 2:15 and the dams of Rowellan 2:09%, Arzilla 2:12%, etc.) 
bv Electioneer, out of Mamie C. (dam of 3 in 2:30 and the dam of Aldeana 2:25) 
bv imported Hercules; second dam by Langford, son of Williamson's Belmont, etc. 

The second dam of Fairhills was Elsie, the greatest speed-producing daughter 
of Gen Benton. She was the dam of Rio Alto 2:16% (a sire), Novelist 2:27 (a 
sire) Palita (2) 2:16 (dam of 2 and of Palite, sire of Pal, the unbeaten two-year- 
old o'f 1909, with a record of 2:17%), Mary Osborn (2) 2:28%, and Salvina 2:30. 

The third dam was Elaine 2:20 (dam of Iran Alto 2:12%, a sire, Palatine 
218, Altoaine 2:29% and Anselma 2:29%) by Messenger Duroc (sire of 23 in the 
2:30 list). 

The fourth dam was Green Mountnln Maid (dam of Electioneer and 9 in the 
2:30 list) by Harry Clay 45, etc. 

Every dam in Fairhills' pedigree to the fourth generation is either a 2:30 per- 
former or a great broodmare. As an outcross for Wilkes, Nutwood and Director 
mares this strongly bred Electioneer stallion should produce horses perfect In 
gait, color and disposition, that will have early and extreme speed. He has every- 
thing in his favor and should be given a record well below 2:20 this year. The 
only reason for selling is retiring from the business of breeding trotters, and will 
sell at extremely low prices, considering their breeding, soundness and individual- 
ity, every head, including some choicely bred mares by McKinney, Mendocino 
2:19%, Searchlight 2:03% and Monterey 2:09%, and all the colts and fillies by 
Kinney Lou 2:07%, Mendocino 2:19% and Fairhills. Most of them are eligible for 
registration; all the mares but two being registered. 

This is a grand chance for some one to get a bargain. For further particulars 
and catalogue, address HOPLAND STOCK FARM, 

Hopland, Mendocino County, Cal., 
or 1210 Flood Rulldlng, San Francisco. Cnl. 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 



The Annual Short -Horn Sales 



MRS. J. H. GLIDE will be held 
— January 24, 1910 

The Greenwood offering comprises 

25 head yearling and two-year-old bulls, 1 5 head choice 
cows and heifers, 

including first prize winners at Alaska-Yukon-Exposition. 




HOWARD CATTLE CO., win be held 

a January 25, 1910 

The Howard Cattle Company offering comprises 

35 head yearling and two-year-old bulls, 20 head choice 
heifers. 

Offering includes sons of the twice grand Champion of America 
Lavender Viscount 124755; also hulls strong in the hlood of 
the champion Choice Goods 18(>802. 



These Offerings Exceed in Number and Equal in Quality the Banner Sale of 1909. 
In Sales Pavilion of FRED. H. CHASE & CO., 478 Valencia St., San Francisco. 

For catalogue and further particulars apply to 
MRS. J. H. GLIDE. 910 H. St.. Sacramento, Cal. HOWARD CATTLE CO., 64] Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 8, 1910. 



METHODS OF DETECTING TUBER- 
CULOSIS. 



Tuberculosis among cattle and 
swine has increased rapidly during the 
last few years. It is becoming a gen- 
erally recognized fact that something 
must be done to check the spread of 
this malady. Before anything defi- 
nite can be done in the way of pre- 
ventive measures, some sure method 
of detecting the disease must be avail- 
able. The tuberculin test is the only 
means that has been discovered so 
far by which the disease can be de- 
tected with certainty in a live ani- 
mal. This test has been much abused 
and misrepresented. In Bulletin No. 
107 of the Iowa Experiment Station 
Dr. Stange shows the fallacy of the 
stand taken by those who oppose the 
test and proves that it is reliable when 
properly administered by citing a long 
list of experiments which the veter- 
inary section has conducted along this 
line. 

The latter part of the bulletin gives 
the results that have been obtained 
in quarantining affected animals and 
using them for breeding purp( les. 
Condensed reports of experiments 
that have been conducted by the ani- 
mal husbandry section to determine 
whether or not tuberculosis can be 
transmitted from cattle to hogs are 
also given. This bulletin is a mine 
of information to stockman and others 
interested in the tuberculosis problem. 
Copies can be obtained free as long as 
the supply lasts. Address Chas. F. 
Curtiss, Director Iowa Experiment 
Station, Ames, Iowa. 




Registered Trade Mark -4^ 

SPAVIN CURE 





Results Like this and Absolute 
Protection are Invincible Argu- 
ments in Favor of "Save-the- 
Horse." 

FREEPORT, Lt I., Nov. 29, 1909. 

Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. T.: 

Centlemen: Enclosed find check for 
one more bottle of "Save-the-Horse" 
Spavin Cure. 

Every horseman around here thought 
the horse was incurable, but they don't 
think so now. 

Here Is what I've done with "Save- 
the-Horse," and some of these cases 
were cured two and three years ago, 
as you know, and are cured to-day. In 
fact, am not afraid to undertake any 
case for which "Save-the-Horse" Is in- 
dicated without the guarantee. 

The first case was a gray mare witli 
bone spavin over three years' standing. 
She was so lame everyone thought she 
would never go sound again. In six 
weeks' time (using only one bottle of 
"Save-the-Horse") she did not take a 
lame step. Let her out to the Freeport 
Golf Club and worked every weekday. 

The next case was a fine blooded 
horse with ringbone, belonging to a 
friend of mine. This took about one 
and a half bottles of "Save-the-Horse." 
In two months' time he did not take a 
lame step. 

Also cured a polo pony who was 
hardly able to get out of the stable; 
both hind legs affected with the worst 
bone spavin I ever saw. Bought him 
for $10, and everyone said I would 
have to saw off his legs and have new 
ones made. The whole hock was af- 
fected. He had been fired and blistered 
three times. I used "Save-the-Horse," 
and in ten weeks' time you would not 
know that he had ever been spavined 
except for the marks of the firing iron. 

Have also cured a fine saddle horse 
of thoroughpin with "Save-the-Horse," 
also several cases of windpuff. 

Will be glad to answer anyone writ- 
ing to me regarding these cases. Yours 
truly, CARL, DARKNBERG. 

$5 A BOTTLE, 

with signed guarantee. 

This is a binding contract, and pro- 
tects purchaser absolutely in treating 
and curing any case of BONE and 
BOG SPAVIN, THOROUGHPIN. RING- 
BONE (except Low). CURB. SPLINT, 
CAI'i'KD HOCK, WINDPUFF, SHOE- 
BOIL INJURED TENDONS, and all 
LAMENESS. No scar or loss of hair. 
Horse works as usual. 

Send for copy of this contract, book- 
let on all lameness and letters from 
prominent business men, bankers, 
farmers and horse owners the world 
over on every kind of case. 

At all druggists and dealers, or ex- 
press paid. 

TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
III ng ha in ( on . V. Y. 
D. E. Newell, 
H Bayo Vlwtn Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 
I in* Market Street, Snn Franciaco, Cal. 



An attractive placard, headed with a 
picture of four horses and the words, 
"Please be kind to us — We work hard 
for you," is being circulated in Cin- 
cinnati by the Ohio Humane Society. 
It reads as follows: 

Please give us water often. 

Please give us a moment's rest on 
the way up the hill. 

Please do not overload us. We are 
doing our best. 

Please don't use the whip. It is sel- 
dom necessary. 

Please remember that we will re- 
spond to a word as quickly as to a 
blow. 

Please look out for our health and 
don't work us when we are sick. 

Please see that we are properly 
shod. 

Please be sure that we have enough 
to eat and that we are fed regularly. 

Please keep us in such good condi- 
tion that you'll be proud to drive us. 

Please see that the harness fits and 
does not chafe sore or tender spots. 

Please remember that two weeks' 
vacation each year will make us more 
serviceable and valuable. 

Remember we work hard for you 
and get no pay. 

o 

Sows of some breeds farrow three to 
four pigs each and raise one of none. 
Bergshire sows usually farrow from 
seven to ten and raise them. A sow 
cannot be considered prolific even if 
she farrows a large number of pigs and 
raises only a few of them. We know 
of a number of Berkshire herds with 
an average litter of more than seven 
pigs. If a sow from her first farrow- 
ing up to the end of her usefulness 



IIIMDKM) \OTH E. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN 
Society (The German Bank), (Member 
of the Associated Savings Banks of 
San Francisco), 526 California street; 
Mission Branch, 2572 Mission street, 
near Twenty-second; Richmond Dis- 
trict Branch. 432 Clement street, be- 
tween Fifth and Sixth avenues. 

For the half year ending December 
31, 1909, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent per an- 
num on all deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Monday, January 3, 
1910. Dividends not called for are 
added to the deposit account and earn 
dividends from Januarv 1, 1910. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 



THE SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 
(Member of the Associated Savings 
Banks of San Francisco). 101 Montgom- 
ery street, corner Sutter street. 

For the half year ending December 
31, 1909, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent per 
annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday, January 
3, 1910. Dividends not drawn become 
a part of the deposit accounts and earn 
dividends at the same rate from Janu- 
ary 1st. Money deposited on or before 
January 10th will earn interest from 
January 1st. 

WM. A. BOSTON, Cashier. 




Its^Own 

M C MURRAY 




L I?(!!#feIlilW 
You Ought to Know 

all about this sulky if you arc in 
need of a bike. Ask for our large 
catalog — it'smailed free. Also book 
of photos of famous horses drawing 
sulky. 

The McMurray Sulky Co. 

Marion, Ohio. 

Full line of speed and road carts. 

wagons, etc. 
\\'rit<> W. J. Kenney, Valencia 
St.. San Francisco, Cal.. for Catalog 



will raise six to eight pigs in each lit- 
ter, she will make a lot of money for 
her owner. Berkshire sows have a 
habit of doing this. Runts are not 
nearly so numerous in the Berkshire 
breed as in other varieties of swine. 



FOR SALE OR TRADE. 

A very handsome bay mare, 16 hands, 
seven years old, sired by Moses S.; first 
dam mare by Hawthorne. She has won- 
derful stamina and has trotted quarters 
in 33 seconds, although never trained or 
given a record. She is a fine road mare, 
with perfect action. 

Price $300, or will trade for a sorrel 
16.2, not over seven years old, that will 
make a four-horse leader. 

Apply for two weeks at Perry's Sta- 
Mex, .\apa, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

Black gelding, foaled 1904, by Aptos 
Wilkes (trial 2:16) dam Chloe 2:24 by 
Dexter Prince. Well broke to drive 
single and double and to saddle. Is 
handsome and has some speed. Is a 
very desirable road horse and the price 
asked for him is very low, considering 
his qualifications. Address Mr. Call- 
fonla, Nevada Stables, San Rafael, 
where horse can be seen. 



FOR SALE. 

Andy Carnegie 2:16% by Jersey 
Wilkes, by George Wilkes, first dam 
Daisy F. by Commander, the dam of 2 
in the 2:20 list. He is a handsome and 
stylish bay gelding, sixteen hands high; 
weighs 1150 pounds; perfectly sound; 
drives single or double; good under 
saddle, and can step in 2:12. He is a 
fine prospect. This horse had been do- 
ing heavy work on a ranch until last 
year; since that time, with compara- 
tively little training, he won the only 
race in which he was entered in three 
straight heats. For further informa- 
tion, write G. W. BUNNELL. Redlands, 
Cal. 



FOR LEASE. 

KINNEY ROSE 2:13%, by MeKlnney 
2:11'/,, dam Golden Rose by Falrose; 
second dam Lady Harper by Alaska: 
third dam by Algona; fourth dam by 
Oddfellow, etc. Handsome dark bay 
stallion, stands 15.3 hands and weighs 
over 1200 pounds. A splendid horse in 
every respect, handsome, intelligent, 
good disposition and gives promise of 
being one of the fastest trotting sons 
of the great McKlnney. His get, the 
oldest of which are two years old, 
all show great speed and are fine indi- 
viduals. Kinney Rose will be leased 
for the breeding and racing season of 
1910 to a responsible party. 

For particulars call on or address 
CHRIS H ASHAGEX, 
8801 1! 1st St., Snn Francisco. 



CHESTNUT TOM 4.14R8 FOR SALE. 

I want to sell my stallion Chestnut 
Tom 2:15, as I am now engaged in busi- 
ness and cannot give him my attention. 
He is by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, sire of 
John A. McKerron 2:04%, the fastest 
trotting stallion in America, and of 
Copa de Oro 2:01 V4. the fastest pacing 
heat winner of 1909. His dam, Zeta 
Carter, is by Director 2:17, and his 
grandam Lida W. 2:18V4 Is by Nut- 
wood 2:18%, and is the dam of four in 
the list. Chestnut Tom is the sire of 
Louise Carter, three-year-old record 
2:24, the only one of his get ever 
trained. Chestnut Tom was foaled in 
1898. Is a very strong and vigorous 
horse, and will be a sure sire of speed 
if given an opportunity. 

For price and further particulars, ad- 
dress GEO. T. ALGEO, 
3804 Piedmont Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

Kuan gelding, trotter, four years old, 
15.3, sired by Antrim, first dam Myrtle, 
second dam India, third dam Kate Ben- 
jamin, fourth dam Rose by Rattler. 
Trained 10 weeks last spring, trotted a 
mile in 2:17%, last half in 1:04%, last 
quarter in 32 seconds. A sure 2:10 
trotter for next year. 

Bay Oily, black points, five years old, 
15.2. Natural pacer. Sired by Antrim, 
sire of Anzella 2:06%, first dam Daisie 
Ronan, second dam Black Midget, third 
dam Morg. Was worked 10 weeks last 
spring; she paced a mile in 2:15%, last 
half in 1:03%, last quarter in 30% sec- 
onds. 

Both these horses are good gaited, 
level headed and game, wear nothing 
but the harness, and absolutely sound. 
If you want green racing material, these 
can show you speed at any time. 

J. JOHNSTON, 
1420 Deerlng Avenue, Melrose, Cal. 



FOR SALE 

Nearest 2:22 

Sire of 

Highfly 2:04 1 4, Alone 2:09 1 4 , 
Trueheart 2:19 , Joe Gans 2:19^, 
Just It (8-yew-oid) 2:19^, 

and brother to John A. McKerron 2:04% second 
fastest stallion in the world. 

Nearest is lb% hands high, weight 1300 pounds. 
This horse is a sure foal getter and Is in splendid 
condition. 

Address. MRS. S. V. BARS TOW, 

1042 Alameda Ave., San Jose, Cal. 



Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases ol veterinary 
dentistry. Complicated cases treated suc- 
cessfully. Calls from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

The best work st reasonaoie prices 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL. 

620 Ootavia St., between Fulton and Grove. 
Phone Special 3074. San Franeiaoo, Cal. 



GLIDE BROTHERS 

Successors to J. H. Glide & Sons. 
Sole Proprietors of the 
FAMOUS BLACOW-ROBERTS-CLIDE 
FRENCH MERINO SHEEP. 

Glide Grade— 7-8 French and 1-8 Spanish Merino 
—Thoroughbred Shropshire Rams- 
Rams for sale at all times. 
P. O. Box 215. Telephone and telegraph. 
Dixon. Cal. Address. Dixon. Cal. 



PEDIGREED FOX HOUNDS. 

All guaranteed, broke dogs and puds. 400 red 
fox cubs. Price list. 

J. D. STODGHILL. Sheloyvllle Ky. 



GOOD FISHING 

and pleasure boating on the Marin snore at 
Tiburon and vicinity. Fishing Tackle to let and 
Bait always on hand. First-class boats at reas- 
onable prices. 

San Francisco Boat house, 

Caft. F. Wm. Khrke. Prop.. Tiburon. Cal. 
Good ferry service from foot of Market St.. 



Blake, Moffit & Towne 

Dealer, in PAPER 

1400-1450 4th St., San Franciaco, Cal. 

Blake. Moffit A Towne. Los Angelas. 
Blake. McFall Jc Co., Portland. Ore. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY, 

High-Class Art in 
HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 
Artiatic Designing 
141 Valencia St., San Franciaco 

RUBEROID ROOFING. 

Weather Proof. Acid Proof, Fire ttesisting. 
BONESTELL & CO. 
118 to 124 Fint St., San Francisco. Cal. 



MUSS 



Our New 
CATALOG 

Beautifully Illustrated - FREE 



C. C. MORSE & CO. 

Seeds - Plants - Trees 
57 Jackson St. San Francisco 



"1TE3T0B" "IMPOBTED" "B07AL ITESTOB" 



Green Label, 



Blue Label, 




The Original Egyptian" 



You Can't Cut Out 



A BOG SPAVIN, PUFF or 
1HOKOUGHFIN, but 




ORBINE 



will clean them off permanently, and 
you work the horse same time. l>oes 
not blister or remove the hair. Will 
tell yon more if yoa write. S2.00 pet 
bottle at d'lers ordellv'd.BooktDfree. 

ABSORBINB, JR.. for mankind. 
$1 bottle. Reduces Varicose Velns.Var* 
Hydrocele, Ruptured Muscles or Ltga- 
Enlarged Glands. Allays pain quickly. 
W. F. YOUNG, P. 0. F., 54 Temple St., Springfield, Mass. 
For Sale by— Langley & Michaels, Ban Fran- 
cisco, Cal.; Woodward, Clark A, Co., Portland, 
Ore.: F. W. Brann Co., Los Angeles, Cal.j 
Western Whosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cel.; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 



Saturday, January 8, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



California Breeders Association 

Canfield - Clark Stakes No, 1 

To he raced under the auspices of the California Breeders Association 
for foals of 1908 to be raced as 2-year-olds in 1910. 

Entries to close February 1, '10. 

$ 1 000 Guaranteed Purse for Trotters 



ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS. 



Feb. 1, '10, $10; June 1, '10, $15; final payment, $25, ten days hefore the 
meeting begins at which the race is to he trotted. Nothing additional from 
money winners. 



CONDITIONS. 



Mile heats, 2 in 3. Distance, 150 yards. Entry must be accompanied by 
entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment 
forfeits all previous payments. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these stakes in case the number of 
entries received is not satisfactory. 

Money divided 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. 

Write for entry blanks and further information to 

«_'. .\. t VXFIELD, President. \VM. I,. JAMBS, Secretary, 

317 West 17th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 




Zolock 2:05J 



34471. 



Sire of 

Sherlock Hoi mes'2:06 R. Ambush - 2:0!!% 

Delilah 2:06% Velox - - 2:09% 

Bystander 2:07% Boton de Oro 2:10% 

Josephine - - 2:07)4 McO. D. 2:11% 

etc., etc. 

By McKinney 2:11%, dam. the great brood 
mare. Gazelle 2:11%. 

Will make a short season, Dec. 1st to April 1st, at 

SAN JOSE DRIVING PARK, SAN JOSE, CAL. 



Terms: 
$50. 



McKinney's Fastest Entire Son 



Address, 



Monterey Road. 

N. S. YOUNC, San Jose 



ZOMBRO 2:11, 



The Great Sire of Trotters, 

•O»O»Q»O«0«O«0«0«O«0»O« 0«0»0»0«OfO«X 
0»< • " • • •0«C'»0»0«0»0»0»0»0»0»0»0»OI 



Will be in the stud at 



Los Angeles until April 1, 1910 



TERMS: $100 to insure. Money refunded if mare proves not in foal. 

ZOMBRO has 14 new standard performers for 1909, 12 new ones in 2:20, 7 in 
2:15 and 2 in 2:10. Ten of his get reduced their records in 1909. He now has 59 
standard performers, of which 39 have records of 2:20 or better, 22 have records 
of 2:15 or better, and 9 have records of 2:10 or better. No other horse living ever 
made such a showing except Zombro's sire, McKinney. Get a Zombro while you 
have the opportunity. Address GEO. T. BECKERS, 

3727 Sontb Flgneroa St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



PALITE 45062 



A Sire of Early Speed. 



Qiro Niitwnnri WilLpc 7-1/ii- sire of Copa de Oro 2:01%, .John A. McKerron 2:04%. etc., and 
OIIC, I1UINUUU TTIII\C5 A.IU2) dams of San Francisco 2 :07%, Mona Wilkes 2 :0:j%, etc. 

Dam Palita (2) 2*16 '' : 



dam of 4 ; fourth dam Green Mountain Maid, dam of 9. 

PALITK is the sire of the 2-year-old stake winner Pal 2:17%, and of the :i-year-old Mis Com- 
plete, second to the Occident Stake winner El Volante in 2:13%, and timed separately in 2:14%. I'a- 
lite is one of the best bred stallions of the Wilkes-Klectioneer cross living. His colts are all trotters, 
good gaited and determined. 

He will make the season of 1910 at the ranch of the undersigned at 

DIXON, CAL. Terms: $40 for the Season ^T^AlftX*™™ at my 

Good pasturage at $2.50 per month and best of care taken of mares, but no responsibility as- 
sumed for accidents or escapes. 

For further particulars address 

E. D. DUDLEY, (Owner), Dixon, Cal. 

Pedigrees Tabulated 

(Typewritten, Suitable for Framing.) 

Stallion Folders 

with picture of the horse and terms on lirat page; coinplet. 
tabulated pedigree on the two inside pages and description on 
back page. 

Stallion Cards 

Two sides, size x 6j^, to fit exvelope. 

Stallion Cards for Posting 

Hize, one-half sheet, 14 x 22; size, one-third sheet, 11x14. 



STALLION SERVICE BOOKS, $1. 

It Pays to Advertise Your Horse! 

Address, BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

366 Pacific Bldg. , San Francisco 



California Breeders Association 

Canfield - Clark Stakes No, 2 

To he raced under the auspices of the California Breeders Association 
for foals of 1909 to be raced as 2-year-olds in 1911. 

Entries to close February 1, '10. 

$ 1 000 Guaranteed Purse for Trotters 



ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS. 



Feb. 1, '10, $5; Nov. 1, '10, $10; April 1, '11, $10; final payment, $25, 

ten days before the meeting begins at which the race is to be trotted. Noth- 
ing additional from money winners. 



( o\ ihtiov s. 



Mile heats, 2 in 3. Distance, 150 yards. Kntiy must be accompanied by 
entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment 
forfeits all previous payments. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen this stake in case the number of 
entries received is not satisfactory. 

Money divided 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. 

Write for entry blank and further information to 



C. A. CANFIEMJ, President. 



WM. I,. JAMBS, Secretary, 
:ti7 West iTih St., I. <>s Ingelea, Cal. 



The Stallion Number 



— OF THE — 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



Will be Issued Feb. 26, '10 



It will have a handsome cover in colors, contain many illustrations and be re- 
plete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 

IF YOU OWN A STALLION 

don't fail to advertise him in this number, as an advertisement in this issue will 
reach every owner of a good mare on this coast, besides having an extensive circula- 
tion throughout the United States, Australia and the Hawaiian Islands. 

IF YOU OWN A MARE 

you will find this number interesting and valuable, as it will contain the stallion an- 
nouncements, giving particulars as to description, pedigree, terms, etc., of all the 
best stallions on the coast, and from these announcements you can decide on what 
stallion will nick best with your mare. 

EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN HARNESS HORSES 

will be interested in reading this number, as it will contain statistics, news, and 
articles that will make it entertaining reading and valuable to preserve as a work of 
reference. 

AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM . 

not only for stallions, but for general advertisers who wish to reach the Horsemen, 
Horse Breeders, Farmers and those who arc interested in Field Sports, it will be 
particularly valuable. 

OWNERS OF STALLIONS 

who wish illustrations of their horses to appear in this issue should have photo- 
graphs prepared without delay and semi in their orders for space. A specially low 
price has been decided on for advertising in this issue, placing it within the reach of 
all. Write for price ami particulars to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

San Francisco 



Take the Breeder and Sportsman. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 8, 1910. 



/ Mr. Woolfolk Henderson, of Lexington, Ky., who has made an unprecedented record during the year 1909, shot at Houston, Texas, 

£ December 20-22, with the following results: 



A Whirlwind Finish! 



£ High Amateur Average, 
1 



800 x 825. 



Longest Run, Unfinished, . 252 Straight. 

At this shoot Mr. Henderson used the same load in 



High Gun, Last Day, 



274 x 275 



PETERS SHELLS 

that he has shot throughout the year. His scores are an eloquent witness to the shooting efficiency of these goods. See a little later 

advertisement for full particulars. 



5 THE PETERS CARTRIDGE COMPANY, CINCINNATI, 0. 

5'.V\V\\N\\\\\NNNXXN\.XNNXXNVVNX\.NVNXNX\.N> k NXNXNNXXNXXXXXX\\\\X\NNXXXNNSNXNXXNX\X\v\X-VNN\X\X\XN\\\XNNX\NV\XX\XNX%X\X 



New York: 98 Chambers St.. T. H. Keller, Mgr. 

San Franclnco: <I0M-«12 Howard St., J. S. French, Mgr. 

New Orleans! 321 Magazine St., J. W. Onborne, Micr. 



DISTILLED 



ifernloc 

lif -NAME REGISTERED -/^^g^V^W PATENTED, APRIL 21*! 1908- 



EXTRACT 




Largest money winner in the world outside of Grand Circuit 



DAYBREAK 



"It's a great body 
wash and liniment. 
T. F. McGt iKE." 




"I think it a per- 
fect leg wash and lo- 
tion. 

E. F. (Jerks." 



FERNLOC Is Nature's Greatest Body Wash and Liniment. 
Contains 20 per cent. Grain Alcohol. 



It always 


It always 


Increases Speed, Stimulates 


Induces a Healthy Circulation. 


and Strengthens, Producing 


Prevents Congestion, Chills and 


Staying Qualities. 


Colds. 


It always removes Soreness, Rheumatism, Inflammation and Stiffness from muscles 


and tendon). 



FEKNLOC does not Stain or Blister. It produces a Smooth. Healthy. Skin and Hair. 
"YOV CANNOT TSE IT WRONG." 



One Gal. Jugs, $3. Five Gal. Jugs. $10. Half Barrel and Barrels, $1.50 per Gal. 
Ask for books and circulars giving full information and directions. 



HI-:\I.KH* WHO SKI, I, FI'.HM.OC. 

J. <;. Rend A BroM Ogden, I'tah 

Jenkins & llro Salt I,nke City, Utah 

F-. II. Irlnh Butte, Mont. 

O. It. Nestos Spokane, Wash. 

HnMka Harness Co Tncoma, Wash. 

T. M. Henderson Seattle, Will, 

Keller Harness Co Portland, Ore. 

M. H. Harris Saddlery Co Mnrysvltle, Cal. 

R. Grunt Potter Sacramento, Cal. 

\\ . i:. DeteiM Pleauatea, cm. 

J. V. Lewis Denver, Colo. 

W. J. Kenney San Franclnco, Cal. 

Manufactured by 

THE FORESTINE COMPANY, 

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Daily News Bulletins, Latest Papers and 
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SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



KENDALL'S SPAVIN 




The Remedy You 
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No other preparation has done as much 
for the horse and horsemen. Kendall's 
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past 40 years. It is the quick, sure, safe, 
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Spavin, Ringbone, Curb, 
Splint, Swellings, Cuts, 
Sprains, Bruises, all Lameness 



$1 a Bottle — May Save Hundreds 



CURES SPAVINS, CURBS, SPRAINS, 
MAKES CHEAP HORSES VALUABLE 

Galien. Mich., Jan. 6, 1909. 
Dr. B. J. Kendall Co. 
Dear Sirs: I hesitate no longer in buying 
horses with Spavins or Curbs, in fact with blemishes of 
any kind, for I know what your medicine will do. I always 
make a handsome profit buying such horses cheaply, cure 
them up with your medicine, and sell them for a grand 
price. Your medicine can't be beaten. 

Respectfully yours, JOS. HAAS, (R. R. No. Z) 



WONDERFUL FOR MAN AND BEAST 

1317A Kentucky Ave., St. Louis, Mo.. Apr. 23, 1909. 
Dr. B. J. Kendall Co., Enosburg Falls. Vt. 

Dear Sirs: In regard to your Spavin Cure. I must say 
that it is one of the best medicines that was ever put on the 
market for sale. / have been using it for the last three years 
in my stable, and find it one of the best I ever tried for every 
kind of lameness or sore. // is a wonder/ul remedy for man 
or beast. I advertise your remedy every time I have a 
chance, because I know what it will do. 

Yours truly. HUGO KING. 



ALSO FAMOUS AS A FAMILY REMEDY 

Accidents will happen and the greatest "First aid to the injured" is the old standby, Kendall's Liniment. Sold by 
druggists everywhere at $1 a bottle, 6 for $5. Prepare today for the emergency of tomorrow. Stop at the drug- 
gist's and be sure you get Kendall's. Ask for a copy of "A Treatise on the Horse and His Diseases," or write direct to 



DR. B. J. KENDALL COMPANY, 



ENOSBURG FALLS, VT. 



ADVERTISE in the Breeder and Sportsman! 



Saturday, January 8, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



16 



GOLCHER BROS. 

(Formerly of Clabrough.Golcher & Co.) 




Fine Fishing Tackle, Guns, Sporting and Outing Goods 

Phon. -r.mpor.ry 1883. 5I0 M ar ket St., San Francisco 



MANUFACTURERS 
A l° OUTFITTERS 

FOR THE I 

SPORTSMAN 
CAMPER**? 
ATHLETE. 



Company J ev ery ne 



-48-52 GEARY ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EQUIPMENT 
^APPARATUS 

FOR 

EV ERY NE ED. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
SUPPLIES. 



PHIL. B. BEKEART CO., 

SOLE PACIFIC COAST BRANCH 



No Stock Carried. 
Good. Sold to the Trad. Only 



For various manufacturers of Fire Arms, Sporting Goods, 
and Fishing Tackle. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Q Piece 




Our new "3-BoK, :i-Piece 1909 Model Gun has the simplest and fastest lock ever 
put in a gun. .Some makers claim a three-piece lock, but do not show or count the 
mam spring— now, we both show and count the main spring— see cut above 
Please note we ha ve cut out all cocking bars, levers and push rods and hook right 
on to the toe of the hammer. This not only makes a lock with large, strong parts 
but a lock that works as smooth as oil. 

We use an unbreakable coil top lever spring, also a coil main spring which 
acts directly on the hammer, and a horizontal sear, which makes a very fast lock 
with a quick, clean, sharp and snappy pull. 

Send for art Catalog and special prices, 18 grades, tl".7!> not to $300 list. 
Fac. Coast Branch— Phil. B. Bekeart Co., 717 Market St., San Francisco 

ITHACA GUN CO. 



Dept. 15, 



Ithaca, N. Y. 



75 PER CENT 



OF ALL HORSE OWNERS 

AND TRAINERS 



USE AND RECOMMEND 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE FOOT REMEDY 



—SOLD BY- 




Sol. DeutHch San Franclaco, Cal. 

Pierce Cotler Co Los Angeles, Cal. 

R. Grant Potter Sacramento, Cal. 

Miller .V Patterson San Diego, Cal. 

J. G. Read A Bro. . Osden, Utah 

E. H. Irish Butte, Mont. 

A. A. Kraft Co Spokane, Wash. 

Thos. M. Henderson Seattle, Wash. 

C. Rodder Stockton, Cal. 

VVm. E. Detels Pleasanton, Cal. 

V. Koch . San Jose, Cat 

Keystone Bros San Francisco, Cal. 

Kred Reedy Fresno, Cal. 

Jno. McKerron San Francisco, Cal. 

Jos. MeTlgue San Francisco, Cal. 

II r yd on Bros I.os Angeles, Cal. 



Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs 
let. June .to. IIHXI. «terlnl Number 1318. 



JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison Street, Chicago. 

ROSS McMAHON 



Awning and Tent Co. 

Camp Furniture, Awnings, Hammocks and Covers in stock and to order. 
Flags and Banners. 

Phone Kearny 2030. 403 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



I The New York Athletic Club's Ama- 
teur Championship High Averages 
for the Tournament 



December 8th, 9th. 



L. S. (ierman 
(ieo. L. Lyon 
K. s. Hodgman 
Chas. Newcomb 
Cbas. Mink . 



192 out of 200— <m; per cent, 
188 out of 200— 94 per cent. 
187 out of 200— 93J£ percent 
187 out of 200—9:% percenl 
186 out of 200— per cent. 



All the above gentlemen used 

DUPONT 

SPORTING POWDERS 

Wherever shooting is difficult requiring a load which holds its patterns 
and which gives to the sportsman a feeling of reliance, you will find the high 
average winners shooting 



DUPONT 



SPORTING POWDERS 



The Regular and Reliable Brands. 




AN UNPARALLELED RECORD IN SHOOTING HISTORY MADE BY THE PARKER GUN. 

At Chicago, the week beginning June 21. Mr. Frank Fisher won the Preliminary Handicap from 
the 18 yard mark, shooting at ten doubles and eighty singles— score. 94. 

Mr. Fred Shattuck won the Grand American Handicap from the is yard mark— score, 9<i, and 'JO 
straight in the shoot-off. 

Mr. Kred Gilbert again won the Professional Championship with a ecore of 198 out of 200, which 
included 10 doubles, of which he broke :17, making his second consecutive w inning of this cliiasic 
event, arid the fourth consecutive winning for the PA KKF.K GI N 

TIIK PARKER GUN also won tho High General Average for the ontiro tournament, thus winning 
about all there was in sight. 

PARKER BROS., MERIDEN, CONN. <oid..tcun Buiid.r. in Am.ric... 

New York Salesroom., 32 Warren St. 



TQuiMh Oinrmeni 

WC Will Mmks # /force Over; 




Oil NNsfel 


will I'll t Bound legs under him and ^h^i^i^i^b^h^ 

» ill save him from the cheap hawker and trader. It is the 
standard euro for Spavins, Curbs, Splints, Windpuffs and all 
the various lumps and bunches of like kind. Keep it always on 
hand and you will be prepared when trouble comes. Leadlug 
horsemen everywhere know it and use it. 

Mr. IT. TI. Clark, Frodonla. N. T.. write*: "The bottle of 
Qulnn'a Ointment imrrha*efl from 70U about two yearaago 
lemoval a curb and tborougbptn and did It for good. My 
horoe'a leg la aa emootb aa ever." 

Price $1.00 per bottle. Sold by all druggist* or sent by mail' 
Write for circulars, testimonials, etc. 

W.B. EDDY A COMPANY, WHITEHALL, M. Y. 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 



16 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 8, 1910. 



Fine 
Harness 




The Best Horse Boots 

we Harness 
'orse boots 



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Shoot the Shells With Steel 
Protection Around the Smokeless Powder. 



You get that protection in U. M. C. Arrow ami Nitro Club brand* which are the only shells made in America lined with steel. Yet you pay 
no more than you do for the unlined makes. 

It will pay you to buy your shells carefully, for the Steel Lining does several very important things: It keeps out the moisture, protects the 
gun and the shooter because it makes the shell stronger and safer, and improves the shooting in every way. 

1909 U. M. C. Came Laws & Guide Directory Free. 
THE UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., Bridgeport, Conn. Agency, 315 Broadway, New York City. 



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V 




WINCHESTER 

Guns and Ammunition. 



su 



"THEY NEVER FAILED ME. 



HARRY WHITNEY 



From the frozen north as well as from sunny Africa comes more enduring praise for the entire reliability of Winchester 
(inns and Ammunition — the Red W Brand. Harry Whitney, who recently returned from the Arctic, where he spent 
fourteen months and hunted farther North and achieved greatei success than any sportsman ever did before, wisely 
pinned his faith to the Red W combination. He says of it: 

"I used two Winchesters: A Model '95 .30-40 and a .22 Automatic and Winchester Cartridges with both. 
Neither the extreme cold nor rough handling affected their worhing or accuracy. They never failed me." 

THE EQUIPMENT OF MEN OF ACHIEVEMENT. 




In the Marsh or Field 

Selby Loads 

Get the Limit Bags. 
Ask the Shooter Who KNOWS! 



SELBY SMELTING & LEAD CO., 



San Francisco, Cal. 



VOLUME LVI. No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 1910. 



Subscription— $3. 00 Per Year. 




2 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 15, 1910. 



DISTILLED 



jfcrnloc 

% J ^-NAME REGISnRED- ^L^^r"^^^ PATENTED, APRIL 21*! 1908- 



EXTRACT 




Largest money winner in the world outside of Grand Circuit 



DAYBREAK 



"It's a great body 
wash and liniment. 
J. F. McGuibb." 




" 1 think it a per- 
fect leg wash and lo- 
tion. 

E. F. Gbebs." 



FERNLOC Is Nature's Greatest Body Wash and Liniment. 
Contains 20 per cent. Grain Alcohol. 



It always 


It always 


Increases Speed, Stimulates 


Induces a Healthy Circulation. 


and Strengthens, Producing 


Prevents Congestion, Chills and 


Staying Qualities. 


Colds. 


It always removes Soreness. Rheumatism. Intlammation and Stiffness from muscles 


and tendons. 



FERNLOC does not Stain or Blister. It produces a Smooth. Healthy, Skin and Hair. 
" YOU CANNOT USE IT WRONG." 



One Gal. Jugs. $3. Five Gal. Jugs, $10. Half Barrel and Barrels. $1 .50 per < ial. 
Ask for books and circulars giving full information and directions. 



Pi:\IKHS WHO SKI. I, I r.iiM.or. 

J. Reed .V Broa Ogden, Utah 

Jenkins £ llr<> Suit l.akr City, Utah 

H. Irish Butte, Mont. 

0. It. \cNtoM Spoknne, \\ nsh. 

Hoaka Harnena c<> Tacoma, Wauah. 

T. H. lleiKleraon Sent tie, Wash. 

Keller Haraeaa Co Portland, ore. 

H. H. lliirris Saddlery Co Haryarllle, Cal. 

It. (.nun I'otter 9a er amento, Cal. 

\V. E. Detels I'letisniilon. < ill. 

J. A. Lewla Denver, Colo. 

\V. J. Keaney San Krnnclaeo, Cal. 

Hoyden linn I,om Anselea, < al. 

1. nvett Drue; Co Phoenix, \rW.. 

Weal Texas Saddle « <> El Paaoi Texaa 

Manufactured by 

THE FORESTINE COMPANY, 

Williamsport, Pa. 



Every Horse Should Be Clipped in Season 

It is the wise thing to do for the clipped horse not only is easier to clean and looks better, but clipping does much to make him 
immune from coughs, colds and the usual ills that come to a horse from standing in a coat of long, wet hair after any hard 

exertion. The prespiration evaporates quickly from the clipped animal and leaves him dry. On 
cold days a blanket when he stands keeps him comfortable. 

The Best Clipping Machine the World has ever Seen is the 

Stewart Ball Bearing Enclosed Gear Machine 

It is the easiest turning, fastest clipping and most enduring of all machines. The materials in it are 
all of better quality, the workmanship is superior. All file hard cut steel gears, protected from dust 
and dirt and running constantly in oil. It couldn't be better for twice the money. 

Write for the New Catalog Send Now 

CHICAGO FLEXIBLE SHAFT COMPANY, 204 Ontario Street, CHIGA60 





Insure Your Live Stock 



N DIANA AND OHib© 




IHSUBES 

Horses-.Mules X Cattle 

AGAIh/ST OCA TH FROM 
ANY CAUSE 



ESTABLISHED 1886 



CfatP AffBntc w - T. CLEVEROON, 350 Sansome St., San 
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Francisco. 

as. 



LARGEST and OLDEST 
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Assets $350,000. 

No Assessments. 



Responsible parties with 
good business desiring 
agencies apply to State 
Agents. 



HEALD'S 
BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

trains 
for 
Businass 
and places 
its graduates 
in positions. 



Call or write 

425 McAllister st., 

San Francisco. 



WM. F. EGAN, M.R.C.V.S. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 

1155 Golden Gate Av« 

Branch Hospital, corner Webster ana Chestnut 
Streets. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



The First National Bank 

Corner Post and Montgomery Streets 

Complete Banking 
Service 

I. The First National Hank fully equipped for commercial business. 

II. First Federal Trust Company, associated with the First National Bank, 
pays interest on deposits, and takes entire charge of property, real and personal. 

III. Armor Plate Safe Deposit Vaults, the highest type of security, guarantee 
absolute protection for valuables. 

Inspection Invited 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportiman. 




Awarded Gold Medal at California State Fair, 1892. Every horse owner 
who values his stock should constantly have a supply of it on hand. It improves 
and keeps stock in the pink of condition. Ask your grocers or dealers for it. 
Positively cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. Manhattan Food Co., C. P 
Kertel. Pres., 1001-1003 E. 14th St., Oakland. Cal. 



Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 



Breeder and Sportsman 



Saturday, January 15, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 

F. W. KELLEY. Proprietor. 
O 

Turf and Sporting Authority of tho Pacific Coast. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACIFIC BUILDING, 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco Post-Office. 



Terms— One Year, $3; Six Months. 11.75: Three Months. $1. 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kclley, P. O. Drawer 447. San Francisco. Calif. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name 
and address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private 
guarantee of good faith. 



THOSE WHO BUY HORSES NOW from which to 
ureed for the markets of the future cannot get in 
wrong if they exercise ordinary business judgment. 
Any sensible man who buys trees or vines to plant, 
that he may make a living from the sale of the fruit, 
always buys the best and most popular varieties, is 
careful to see that they are free from disease, and 
then carefully cultivates them year after year. Too 
many men who enter upon the breeding of horses 
buy inferior stock to start with and then fail to give 
it even ordinary care. The signs of the times are 
that good horses will never be any cheaper in this 
country than they are now, and that means a profit- 
able business to those who breed and raise that kind. 
The best draft horses cannot be produced from grade 
sires however, and the best trotters will not come 
from inferior stallions of the trotting families. 
Breeders who will select mares with good breeding, 
good looks, soundness, natural speed and gameness, 
and will then breed them to the best stallions they 
can find that have those same qualifications, and 
will generously feed and care for the colts until they 
are yearlings will find it easy to dispose of them at 
prices that will pay a good profit. But figs cannot 
be raised from thorns or grapes from thistles. 
o 

THE STATE FAIR FUTURITY NO 2, which has 
a guaranteed value of $5000 is advertised to close 
February 1st, 1910, with Secretary J. A. Filcher at 
Sacramento. This stake should secure a large entry 
list. It is for the produce of mares covered in 1909. 
There will be four races, two for trotters and two 
for pacers. The two-year-old trotters will start for a 
stake of $600, the two-year-old pacers for a stake 
of $400. The three-year-old trotters will race for 
$1400, and the three-year-old pacers for $1100. There 
will be a consolation purse in each of the four events 
for horses that start and get no money in them. 
These consolation purses are as follows: For two- 
year-old trotters $350, for two-year-old pacers $250, 
for three-year-old trotters $400, for three-year-old 
pacers $350. The entrance fee to this $500 stake is 
$2 to nominate the mare February 1st, $5 July 1st, 
1910, $5 December 1st, 1910, $10 on yearlings Febru- 
ary 1st, 1911, $10 on two-year-olds February 1st, 1912, 
and $10 on three-year-olds February 1st, 1913. Read 
all the conditions in the advertisement in this issue. 

o 

AT THE OLD GLORY SALE last November a 
three-year-old filly with a trotting record of 2:08% 
was sold for $7000, and a full brother to her was 
knocked down after much coaxing for the munificent 
sum of $275. These two horses sold on merit. The 
leading buyers of the country were present at the 
sale and there was spirited bidding on the filly that 
had done something to make her worth several 
thousand dollars, but although the auctioneer dwelt 
on the relationship the colt bore to her, $275 was 
all the buyer thought he was worth, as he had none 
of the speed that made the filly valuable and his 
other qualifications were ordinary. The day is past 
when one horse can be sold on another's reputation. 
To bring the high dollar he must have high qualifi- 
cations. Speed will bring the most money, good looks 
come next and breeding next. When there is an 
animal that has all three of these attributes then 
the bidders are not slow in running his price up. 
Merit tells in the salesring now-a-days as it does 
everywhere. 

o 

GEN. GATES, the stallion whose handsome pro- 
portions are shown on our front page this week, is 
the Morgan horse selected by the United States 
Government to head the farm in Vermont where it 
is proposed to re-establish the Morgan breed of 



horses. Gen. Gates is a full brother to the trotter 
Lord Clinton 2:08%, and was sired by Denning 
Allen, a grandson of Ethan Allen. His dam Sally 
Scott was by the thoroughbred stallion Revenue, his 
second dam by Copperbottom, and third dam by 
Stump the Dealer. Gen. Gates is a black horse not 
over 15 hands. 

o 

MR. FRED GEORGE, advertising solicitor for the 
"Breeder and Sportsman's" stallion edition, left this 
week for a trip through the Sacramento valley in 
the interests of this journal. He will visit Suisun. 
Dixon, Davis, Woodland. Marysville, Chico, Oroville, 
Sacramento, Stockton and Pleasanton while on this 
trip and will try to interview all the horse breeders 
in those localities. 

o 

OUR LOS ANGELES LETTER. 



Los Angeles, Jan. 11, 1910. 

There was little or nothing doing at Agricultural 
Park last week on account of the cold disagree- 
able weather. Toward the end it moderated and 
the trainers began getting ready to go to work in 
earnest, but last night it rained and the track of 
course this morning was only fit to jog on. 

There was a special meeting of the Los Angeles 
Driving Club held last evening to add to the by- 
laws and rules covering the way the new track 
should be run and the plant generally be conducted. 
These are to be laid before the State Board and 
incorporated in the lease from that body. The rent 
is to be $50 per month, and the State retains the 
use of the infield for a parade ground for the na- 
tional guard and other uses that do not conflict 
with training or racing of horses. This agreement 
is to be binding for the term of ten years. 

All the money necessary to build the new track, 
grand stand and stables has been subscribed and 
as soon as the lease is signed work will immediately 
begin, certainly not later than the middle of next 
month and possibly before. The Jiorsemen had 
hoped that the present track would be left until the 
new one was completed but this is impossible as the 
State is as anxious to get to work as the horsemen 
and the track and infield will be immediately torn 
up in order that the buildings contemplated may be 
begun at once. 

That being the case a temporary move of the 
horses in training will have to be made for a short 
time, and as yet it is not decided where they will 
go. Geo. Ford's track at Santa Ana is under dis- 
cussion and also the running track at Santa Anita. 
If the latter can be secured from the Baldwin estate 
for the time the chances are the horses will be 
moved out there as the stabling is excellent and 
the footing good, and it is easily reached from the 
city by trolley to the gates, whereas it is a long 
distance from the depot to the Ford track, neces- 
sitating a conveyance of some kind. 

No matter what the inconvenience is for the time 
being it will be well worth putting up with to have 
the new layout in the end, for it will be one of the 
finest, if not the very fienst trotting track and 
ground in the country when it is completed. A 
commodious grand stand, large and comfortable 
box stalls, and private barns, cart and sulky sheds 
and good fencing, and painted once every two years 
with two coats of standard, paint, according to the 
lease, will insure their being kept in order and 
looking fresh and clean. The whole being part 
of the magnificent park that the State contemplates 
for a pleasure ground and to be one of the show 
places of this city; in fact it will only be separated 
from the park proper by a six-foot wire fence 
which will eventually be covered with vines so it 
will look like a thick ledge. The grand stand will 
face the park and the view across the ground to- 
ward the city and with the back ground of the 
mountains will be superb. 

With the three trotting associations, the Los 
Angeles Driving Club, the Los Angeles Harness Horse 
Association and the California Hreeders' Association, 
combined and an annual fair added there will be a re- 
vival of the horse interest here that will enable Los 
Angeles to give not only as good a race meeting as 
any in the State, but as good as in any State. 

By catering to and getting all classes interested in 
the fair proposition, not only the breeders of horses, 
but cattle and sheep men, fruit growers and auto- 
mobile people, hotel men and furniture dealers, deal- 
ers in mining machinery and farm implements, in fact 
everybody that would be interested in exhibiting their 
goods at an annual fair will soon become interested 
in the matinee or racing end of it, and a number will 
unquestionably buy horses to matinee themselves or 
to have trained to take part in the annual race meet- 
ing. Then matinees can be given by the club with- 
out calling upon outsiders to furnish all kinds of side 
shows to attract an audience. 

The entry blanks for the two $1000 purses for two- 
year-olds to be trotted this year and next given by 
Messrs. Canfield and Clark have been mailed and it 
is to be hoped a liberal entry will be received. The 
conditions call for but 5 per cent of the purse to 
start, and that in three payments and nothing de- 
ducted from money winners. The entries close on 
February 1st, with a payment of $10 to accompany 
the nomination for this year's race and $5 to be en- 
closed with the entry for the race of 1911. Should 
anyone fail to receive a blank, an application to the 
secretary of the California Breeders' Association at 



317 West Seventeenth street, Los Angeles, will bring 
one by return mail. 

Mr. Geo. L. Warlow of Fresno was a visitor at the 
track this morning, the guest of C. A. Canfield. He 
is only waiting for an entry blank to make four nomi- 
nations in the Canfield-Clark two-year-old trots. 

W. G. Durfee is up and about on pleasant days and 
does what jogging he feels able to, but shows the 
hard siege he has been through. 

Margin 2:06% is as big and fat and strong as she 
can be. I saw her owner, Mr. Meyers, jogging her 
the other day and she certainly is not in the beauty 
class at that gait. No one on earth would pick her 
out to beat a bunch of 2:30 horses, but the minute 
she turns round and squares away, my! what a 
change in gait, looks and everything. She then looks 
a trotter all over. Still she is a great deal better look- 
ing now that she is high in flesh than when she came 
here last fall after her wonderful campaign. 

The Los Angeles Driving Club will give a free mati- 
nee on Saturday, the 15th, and one with admission 
charged on the 29th of this month. 

Charlie Thayer is jogging his good looking big 
black colt by Six Bells every day to a white cart and 
the contrast shows the colt off to good advantage. 

Walter Maben worked Red McK. a mile the other 
day in 2:21% and will let him step one in 2:17 or 2:18 
this week, provided the track ever gets good. 

Dr. Wm. Dodge has at last parted with his old 
reliable stand-by, Lohengrin; T. M. Clark, the new 
owner, traded quite a lot of real estate for him. That 
Lohengrin still has his speed was demonstrated on 
West Adams street the other afternoon when he 
brushed two or three blocks with Mr. Goldsmith's 
McKinney mare Sally Lund; both pulled a double load 
and Charlie Epps said it was the prettiest brush he 
had seen for many a day. The police were so busy 
looking at air ships that no arrests were made. Dr. 
Dodge has a colt by Limonero that he is driving 
now that he says is the only road horse on earth. 

There is a report in circulation that Maben will go 
East next summer with a string, including El Volante 
2:13%, Canfield's four-year-old by Zombro, A. B. 
Miller's chestnut mare by Highland C. that paced a 
mile for Maben in 2:07% and a quarter in 29% sec- 
onds and the gray gelding Zomell 2:13% by Zombro, 
owned by the same gentleman. Always provided they 
stay good, and they certainly look and act as if 
they would. JAMES. 

o 

PACIFIC DISTRICT BOARD OF APPEALS. 



A meeting of the Pacific District Board of Ap- 
peals of the National Trotting Association was held 
Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock. There were 
present at the meeting Vice-President E. P. Heald, 
Col. J. C. Kirpatrick, chairman, and Hon. B. F. Rush, 
member of the Pacific District Board of Appeals. 

The first case presented was the protest brought 
before the Board by J. Twohig, driver of the mare 
Ollie B. Ollie B. was fifth in the 2:30 class trot, at 
the Breeders' metting at Salinas last August and 
was beaten for fourth position by Ida Millerton. Mr. 
Twohig claimed that Ida Millerton and Rapidan Dil- 
lon were both not eligible to start in this race as 
they had been trained in the same stable within ten 
daye before the race took place. Affidavits were 
presented by Walter Maben claiming that Rapidan 
Dillon was not in his stable and in no way under 
his control either directly or indirectly from the 
24th day of July, 1909, to the 5th day of Septem- 
ber, 1909, that when he drove Rapidan Dillon on 
the 31st day of July, 1909, at Fresno he was en- 
gaged the same as any other driver that might have 
been engaged to have driven Rapidan Dillon in 
that race, and that he further had nothing to do 
with the shipping of that horse from Fresno to 
Salinas, as the horse had been turned over to 
Thomas Hill at Los Angeles on the 24th day of 
July and from that date on he had nothing to do 
with the training or control of the horse. Mr. 
Maben's affidavit was backed up by affidavits from 
J. H. Bohon, the owner of the horse, and from 
Thomas Hill in whose charge she was put. On the 
evidence presented, the case was dismissed. 

The appeal from the action of the judges at the 
Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' Association's 
meeting at Chico, 1908, in fining Homer Rutherford 
and Fred E. Ward for laying up heats in the 2:07 
pace was presented. Two of the judges of the race 
were present at the meeting and on the testimony 
presented, the appeals were denied. 

An appeal was made by .Mr. Frank II. Burke ask- 
ing for remission or reduction of the fine imposed 
on his driver, Mr. P. F. Davey by the starter in the 
2:13 class trot at the Salinas meeting of the Pacific 
Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' Association. Mr. 
Davey was fined $25 in the first heat of that trot 
for scoring ahead of the pole horse. Mr. Burke 
claimed the fine was excessive and five times as 
much as it had ever been given any driver during 
the last twenty years for this offense by this asso- 
ciation. Mr. Hurke asked that the fine be reduced, 
claiming that a few such fines would soon drive men 
out of the harness horse business. Mr. Burke further 
claimed that the fine was wrongfully imposed as 
there is no rule of the National Trotting Associa- 
tion allowing the starter to inflict fines, that the 
judges under the rules are the only ones having the 
right to fine. Mr. Burke's appeal was denied. 

o 

Mr. Henry Ford of Porterville, Cal., is the owner 
of a yearling by F. E. Perkins' horse Alhamax 2:22% 
out of a Silkwood mare that is one of the beauties of 
Southern California in the horse line. J. H. Williams 
of Los Angeles will break and train this colt, for 
which Mr. Ford refused an offer of $750. 



-f 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 15, 1910. 



FIRST STANDARD PERFORMERS FOR 1910. 



Five of the Get of Washington McKinney i:W/z 
Make Records at San Jose, Jan. 6th. 

To Washington McKinney 2:17%, that magnificent 
son of the great McKinney 2:11% that F. J. Kilpat- 
rick of this city sold last year to John Donovan of 
King Hill Farm, St. Joseph, Missouri, for $10,000, 
must be credited the first new standard performers 
of 1910. Five of them entered the standard list at 
the new San Jose Driving Park on Thursday of last 
week and while all of them were just dropped inside 
the standard mark, the performance was a wonder- 
ful one as they had received but the most limited 
training and since the 18th of December practically 
no workouts. 

It was a great disappointment to their owner, Mr. 
F. J. Kilpatrick. that he was unable to be present 
and see his trotters take these records, but he has 
been confined to his bed in the Adler sanitarium in 
this city almost the entire time since his return from 
New York early in December, and will probably not 
be out until next week. It was first arranged to hold 
a meeting and mark these horses on Christmas day, 
but the rains interfered and after postponing the 
meeting from day to day a few days of sunshine 
early in the first week of the new year gave prom- 
ise of an early chance to hold it, and on Thursday 
trainer Richard Abies made the effort. He had a 
dozen horses in his string that he wanted to give 
records of some kind, nearly every one by Wash- 
ington McKinney and to give five of these green, un- 
trained horses miles below 2:30 was a feat to be 
proud of under the circumstances. The five that 
took standard records were the following: 
Gerhard McKinney, bay gelding, foaled 1902. . 2:29% 
Dixie McKinney, brown mare, foaled 1902.... 2:29% 

Mary McKinney, bay mare, foaled 1904 2:29% 

Rut ton McKinney, brown gelding, foaled 1906.. 2:29% 
Billy Barlow, chestnut gelding, foaled 1905 2:29% 

All of the above are trotters and by Washington 
McKinney. In addition to these the eight-year-old 
bay mare Elma S. by Nutwood Wilkes was given a 
trotting record of 2:26 and the six-year-old mare 
Katie Yandle by Stam B. was given a trotting 
record of 2:29%. Both these mares, with others 
were sent to the Midwinter Sale on Thursday of 
this week. 

In addition to the above several of the get of 
Washington McKinney were sent to beat 2:50 and 
took records as follows: Sam McKinney, pacer, 2:41; 
Manie McKinney, trotter, 2:47; Juliet McKinney, 
trotter, 2:48%, Little Jimmie. trotter, 2:40. 

Two races were held for $50 purses during the 
afternoon, the trotting event being won by The 
Lord Dillon in 2:34, and the mixed trotting and 
pacing race by Little Jimmy in 2:40. 

The Lord Dillon is a standard and registered 
horse, sired by Sidney Dillon, dam Roblet 2:12 by 
Robin, second dam Eveline, dam of six standard 
performers and grandam of Sonoma Girl 2:05%, etc., 
by Nutwood 600. The Lord Dillon was purchased 
a few weeks since by Mr. Kilpatrick from Dr. J. J. 
Summerfield of Santa Rosa. The horse was pur- 
chased for Mr. W. E. D. Stockes, owner of the 
famous Patchen Wilkes Farm, Lexington, Kentucky, 
and will be sent to this farm on the same train with 
the horses that are consigned to the New York sale. 

The horses consigned to the Midwinter Sale will 
number about twenty and they should bring fail- 
prices as they all have speed enough for roadsters, 
while there are several that will develop speed 
enough to win races. The sale will be held at Madi- 
son Square Garden, January 31st and February 1st, 
2d and 3d. 

o 

PATCH EN WILKES IS DEAD. 



The famous sire Patchen Wilkes died at Danville. 
Ind., on January 2, from the infirmities of old age. 
He was owned by W. D. Stokes, proprietor of the 
Patchen Wilkes Farm, Lexington, Ky., but had been 
under lease for the past year by Horace C. McVey. 
who had done quite a business with him, and as a 
result he will leave quite a large number of foals in 
Indiana. 

Patchen Wilkes 2:29% was foaled in 1892, and was 
bred by Timothy Anglin, of Lexington, Ky., who sold 
him to H. C. Jewett when that gentleman was con- 
ducting a large breeding establishment at Sedge- 
wick, Kan. When the latter disbanded his farm 
Patchen Wilkes was purchased by Mr. Stokes, and 
it was after the famous sire that his farm was named. 

He was by George Wilkes, and was out of Kitty 
Patchen, which was also the dam of Georgianna 
2:26%. She was by Mambrino Patchen and her dam 
was the famous Betty Brown, also by Mambrino 
Patchen, while the next dam was Pickles. 

It was while Patchen Wilkes was in Kansas that 
he achieved his greatest fame, and it was while he 
was there that he sired the "iron horse,'' Joe 
Patchen 2:01%, which, in turn, sired the world's 
champion, Dan Patch 1:55. The last volume of the 
Year Book credited him with thirty-four trotters and 
twenty-six pacers, while seventeen of his sons had 
sired thirty-one trotters and forty-two pacers, and 
while nineteen of his daughters had produced eleven 
trotters and nine pacers. — Western Horseman. 
o 

There will be no sales in Madison Square Garden 
after July. The property has been sold and the im- 
mense structure will be torn down to be replaced 
by a twenty-story office building. 



George Baker, a farmer of Reid Ferry, Shasta 
county, sold a nice driving team the other day for 
$600. They were trotting bred. 



HOW PETER THE GREAT WAS TRAINED. 



Peter V. Johnston, who trained the stallion Peter 
the Great and won the Kentucky Futurity with him 
recently wrote an account of how he educated the 
colt for Henry T. White of the Chicago Tribune. 

Mr. Johnston was a reinsman of national repute 
before the days of Peter the Great. He had made 
a champion pacer of his namesake, Johnston, and in 
Monroe Chief 2:18%, and Piedmont 2:17%, had the 
two best trotting stallions of their day trained by 
one man. 

He took Bodine when he could not trot in 2:30, 
won 920,000 in purses with him in one season, mark- 
ing him in 2:19%. With Aldine, to which he gave 
the same record, Johnston swept the grand circuit, 
not losing a race. Every notable horse trained by 
Johnston he either took after it had been condemned 
by others, or made it from a colt. After "making" 
Peter the Great and seeing him sold for $20,000, 
Johnston trained six of the get of that stallion. To 
five of them he gave standard records, and the other 
Gray Petrus, he drove in 2:20 as a two-year-old with 
less work than any other colt ever had to show that 
sort of a mile. 

In 1896, the late Mr. D. D. Streeter of Kalamazoo, 
sent Johnston a lusty yearling colt by Pilot Medium 
and out of Santos to be broken, and when the young- 
ster was returned Johnston said: "You have a good 
colt." The next spring when Mr. Streeter wanted 
some horses trained Johnston declined. He was out 
of the business and proposed to stay out. "Well," 
said Streeter, "you said I had a good colt, and I want 
you to train him." 

Johnston wanted to oblige Streeter, but did not pro- 
pose to change his plans. So he said: "If you will 
send the colt to my town stable, send a man to take 
care of him, send the feed, and pay the expenses, I 
will take him. but there will be no charge for the 
training. I am not going to make a business of train- 
ing horses nor am I going to stay in Kalamazoo all 
summer." 

"You've got a colt to train," was the reply, and the 
next day the colt and another horse came, the ex- 
planation being that the man could care for both and 
the extra one was for Johnston's private driving. 
Also there was feed galore. And that was the begin- 
ning of the training of Peter the Great, remarkable 
horse. He got second money in the two-year-old 
division of the Kentucky Futurity, making the win- 
ner go in 2:15 to beat him when he was not just 
right; won the three-year-old renewal of the stake, 
taking down $10,000 for his share (his only start at 2 
and 3), and then was sold for $20,000, Mr. Streeter 
reserving ten services for his own mares, from one 
of which he secured Tcon 2:10, that sold for $10,000, 
and from another (exchanged for a service to Bingen) 
came Malcolm Forbes 2:30 as a two-year-old and sold 
for $3750. 

"I began, after Peter came to my town barn, by 
driving him on the streets every morning that spring 
and where the footing was good I would let him step 
along a little. About the 25th of May I said to Mr. 
Streeter: 'This colt can step a 2:50 shot.' 

"If he can trot an eighth in :20 on June 1 he 
will do to keep in the Futurity,' said Mr. Streeter, 
so on that day I went to the track for the first time. 
I was three miles from town, so the colt had all the 
jogging he needed. I went once around the track 
s'owly, the next time a little faster and brushed 
the eighth in :22. Then around again, and that time 
he Stepped the homestretch eighth in :19, so the 
Futurity payment was made. 

"Then I began regular training, working Peter 
three times a week, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, 
as Mr. Streeter could only be there on Saturday. I 
would jog the colt three miles the wrong way of the 
track, then turn and go once around slowly. The 
next time a little faster, the last eighth at a pretty 
fast clip. Then jog around once more, with the last 
eighth as fast as he could do it. Under this plan 
Peter made speed so fast he soon could step an eighth 
in :16, a 2:08 gait. About July 1 the plan was 
changed, working Wednesday and Saturday. We 
would go two heats each day with a fast brush at the 
end of the second mile. On Saturdays 1 would let 
him step one good quarter :33% or :34, That was 
all the speed I could make on the farm track, so 
as I was going fishing for two weeks the first of Au- 
gust I had Peter turned out nights and not driven, 
believing the play spell would be beneficial. 

"On my return I trained at Grand Rapids, starting 
with three heats twice a week, all slow, then changed 
to three heats one workout, and four the next with 
fast brushes at the end of two of the Saturday miles. 

"Peter then could trot an eighth in :15, but I never 
worked him a mile so fast but that he could trot the 
final eighth faster than any other. The first good 
mile I asked of him he went in 2:20, the last half in 
1:08, the last quarter in :33. That was in 1898, and 
looked good for a two-year-old. A few days before 
we shipped to Lexington to trot the FHiturity, Mr. 
Streeter came to see the colt work. I had Peter 
shod behind that day and the blacksmith made a 
change in the shoes by turning a little heel on them. 

"The first mile was in 2:38, and Peter tried to 
break, whereas he formerly had been steady. The 
next mile was 2:32, but he hade a break and pulled 
and choked. I always had driven him with a side 
check, but now put on an overdraw. Then he 
wouldn't trot at all. I scored him ten times and 
whenever he got up to a 3:00 clip he would break 
and run. I went back to the barn, put three ounces 
more weight on in front, took the check bit out of 
his mouth, and checked him under the chin. Then he 
trotted a mile in 2:19% but did not go right. 

"That was Friday. Monday I tried him again but 



he was not good. Then I changed his shoes, going 
back to the original pattern. The next day Mr. 
Streeter came to see him work again. The miles 
were 2:40, 2:30, 2:19. Then I put the three-ounce 
weights back and worked him in 2:30 but he was 
not balanced and after that I had to use the six- 
ounce weights. 

"At Lexington, working Peter three days before 
his race, a quarter boot broke and chafed him so 
that the next morning I could hardly get him to 
move. The morning of the race I sprayed that ankle 
with ether for two hours. Peter went a good race, 
but extra weight tired him. That was Peter's only 
race at a two-year-old, and the following winter he 
was at my barn running out in a paddock pleasant 
days and being fed oats, corn, hay, bran, and carrots, 
but not driven. 

"As a three-year-old Peter's only engagement was 
the Kentucky Futurity, $10,000 to the winner, and 
all he needed was conditioning, as his two-year-old 
race showed him to have speed and manners. I 
worked him at Kalamazoo until June, then went 
to Joliet, 111., until August 1, his work being slow 
miles without any brush work. George Fuller was 
there with Janie T., the filly that had beaten us the 
previous fall, and was confident. He worked his filly 
plenty, and she could step in about 2:18. So just 
before shipping to Grand Rapids I let Peter trot an 
easy mile in 2:16, the last quarter a little under :32. 
At Grand Rapids I gave Peter a lot of miles between 
2:18 and 2:25, and his last work before going to 
Lexington was 2:40, 2:30, 2:16, 2:12%, 2:16, the last 
eighth of the best mile in :15, and the first eighth 
of the last mile in :15%. 

"At Joliet one day Mr. Streeter said: 'I believe 
that colt can win the Futurity. So just put your 
mind on that race and don't take it off until you've 
got the money in your pocket.' I stepped Peter the 
first eighth of two or three miles at Grand Rapids 
in :15% to teach him to go away fast from the wire. 
I knew he woould come the last end of the mile all 
right. 

"He won the Kentucky Futurity as he pleased, and 
I think could have distanced the field. Ed. Tipton 
said he could have trotted in 2:08 had the track 
been good. Peter remained in my stable until he was 
sold, a few months later to Mr. Forbes of Hoston 
for $20,000." 

o 

HIGH CLASS CATTLE AT AUCTION. 



Two great sales of Shorthorn cattle will be held 
at Fred H. Chase & Co.'s pavilion, 478 Valencia 
street, San Francisco, on January 24th and 25th. On 
the first day 48 head from the farm of Mrs. J. H. 
Glide, of Sacramento will be sold. Mrs. Glide says 
in the catalogue: 

This is my second annual sale and in presenting 
this catalogue to the breeders, I believe I am offer- 
ing the choicest lot of Short Horn cattle that have 
ever gone through a California sale ring. It includes 
many of my best show animals, two Junior Cham- 
pions and one Grand Champion. Seven of them are 
from this season's show herd. At the last State Fair 
I won 12 firsts, 9 seconds, 5 thirds, 5 fourths, 2 
Senior, 2 Junior and 2 Grand Champions. 

I wish to call particular attention to the choice 
selection of breeding matrons. Many of them have 
been winners in the show ring and all of them 
are of a quality entitling them to a place in any 
herd. They are in good breeding condition, fresh 
from the pasture with very little fitting. The bulls 
are an exceptionally fine lot, some of them repre- 
senting the best of Cruickshank families and any 
breeder who wants a bull of individual merit and 
fine breeding to head his herd, can find him here. 
One of our judges at the State Fair said: "The herd 
bull is half of the herd." No breeder can make pro- 
gress without a good sire. 

The Howard Cattle Company will offer 54 head of 
their Shorthorns on the day following the Glide sale. 

We quote from the catalogue: 

In selecting the draft for this, our fourth annual 
sale, we do so with a feeling of confidence in its 
success; for never before have conditions been so 
satisfactory, and the future so full of promise of 
prosperous times ahead for the stockman of Cali- 
fornia. 

The tendency of the cattle markets the length and 
breadth of the United States has been continually up- 
wards, and those observers of our local markets will 
have noticed that, though there have been tem- 
porary fluctuations downwards, at times of over- 
supply, they never quite reached the low-water 
marks of the preceding fluctuations, and each suc- 
cessive swing of the pendulum upwards records a 
range of prices which marks a new era. 

Every animal in this offering carries potentially in 
its blood the power to produce these results. It is 
not necessary to point out that without such seed 
stock it is impossible to produce the "Quality Steer," 
the steer that is worth $100 or more on foot because 
he acntally carries under his sleek hide meat that will 
weigh out the value. 

Pure bred cattle, handled from a practical stand- 
point, as we understand it in California, can be relied 
upon to give a good account of themselves under 
every day practical conditions as they exist, and 
the resultant benefit and profit from the use of such 
pure breds quickly asserts itself. 

Mr. Geo. P. Bellows, the well known cattle expert 
and auctioneer, will officiate at these sales. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January 15, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 







THE SAN FRANCISCO DRIVING CLUB. 



An Organization That Has Genuine Enthusiasm for 
Harness Racing. 

The meetings held by the San Francisco Driving 
Club are always well attended, and there is probably 
not an organization in America that can cheer louder 
or longer over a close finish, or get more enjoyment 
out of a race meeing. All its members want to know 
is that a meeting of the club is to be held, and 
whether it is a race meeting for fun over the stadium 
track in Golden Gate Park, one for small purses at 
some of the near by mile tracks, or a simple business 
meeting at the club's hall, the attendance is always 
good and there are plenty of good contests. 

During the year 1909 this club collected from its 
members and distributed for trophies, charity and 
expenses, the sum of $2,301.25. Of this amount the 
sum of $650 was turned over to that most worthy 
charity, the Youth's Directory of this city at one 
meeting, besides which the club donated $50 to the 
employees in Golden Gate Park who take care of 
the track. 

During the year the club had twelve meetings, 
using the stadium track, also the tracks at Vallejo, 
Concord and other places. At these meetings many 
handsome silver cups were awarded to the win- 
ners and at one or two meetings money prizes were 
raced for and won. The San Francisco Driving Club 
now has a membership of over 158, that number 
being on the roll at the last meeting and several 
applications for membership now being on file, to 
be acted on at the next meeting. 

The club has an enthusiastic, hard working official 
in President W. J. Kenney, who never tires of doing 
things that will elevate the tone of its racing, or 
work to the benefit of the organization. The secre- 
tary of the .club, James McGrath, is another official 
whose work is always well done. The books and ac- 
counts he keeps are absolutely perfect in appear- 
ance, and accounts are balanced to a cent. 

The classification committee now in office is per- 
haps the best posted body of horsemen there is to be 
found anywhere in regard to the speed of the horses 
owned and driven in San Francisco and adjacent 
territory, and they can classify the horses so that 
there is a contest in every race. This alone helps to 
make the sport very attractive, and is a big help 
toward the success of the meetings given by this 
organization. A fall and complete list of the officers 
and members of the San Francisco Driving Club is 
here given: 

President W. J. Kenney 

Vice-President Bert Edwards 

Secretary James McGrath 

Treasurer F. P. Lauterwasser Sr. 

Sergeant-at-Arms H. Schottler 

BOARD OF STEWARDS. 
Geo. E. Erlin Al. Hoffman 

John Nowlan Jas. E. Finch 

F. L. Malthes 

CLASSIFICATION COMMITTEE. 
W. Higginbottom Dan Hoffman 

Chas. Buckley C. L. Becker ; 

Tim Sexton 

MEMBERS PRIOR TO 1909. 

Al. Benson B. Lota 

S. Benson G. Tassi 

Frank Burton W. A. Van Buren 

James Bonney Frank Winchester 

Dr. C. Brown C. A. Walker 

C. A. Buck E. R. Wilson 

A. Bardness Joe Cuicello 

Hugh Boyle Frank Callea 

J. J. Butler John Campodonico 

J. Bairenther M. M. Donnelly 

T. H. Corcoran H. Danz 

F. O. Caldwell T. B. Deffenback 

R. Consani H. Frehlson 

W. Clough F. Gommet 

Fred Clotere V. J. Guinasso 

J. V. Cooney Jack Groom 

John Deschler J- V. Galindo 

Dr. Dalziel A. Helbush 

J. Danz F. S. S. Hill 

Chas. Fulkerson T. F. Judge 

Martin Ford Geo. Kitto 

Geo. Giannini E. P. Luce 

R. P. Giovannoni H. M. Ladd 

Geo. Geitner Nick Lawler 

Wm. Hammer Arthur Lang 

Jack Holland J- W. McTigue 

Henry Hellman G. P. Machado 

A. M. Jerald Dave Newell 

Phil Kohn Jas. O'Kane 

F. P. Lauterwasser Jr. Dave O'Neill 
Tom Lloyde Jack Pastene 

Gus Lindauer Joe Ryan 

Jas. Lombard W. E. Rice 

Chas. Mitchell Al Scofield 

Wm. Michaelsen A. M. Scott 

C. E. Mickens Bert Sharp 
Wm. Pease Oscar Taylor 
L. W. Pfeiffer V. Verilhac 

D. Roberts L. Whiteman 
Al Schwartz J- D. West 

J. L. Smith H. Werner 

John Shea 

NEW MEMBERS, 1909. 
M. Senderman B. B. Dehay 

J. F. Murphy D. Dillon 

R. J. Lathrone E. T. Ayers 

P. J. O'Reilly A. M. Wellen 

A. Ottinger P- Higgins 

J. B. Wilson H. Ahpel 

T. W. Keogh A. W. Kiel 

F. A. Periera L. N. Davis 



John Williams 
Wm. Todt 
Henry Dunlap 
Henry Smith 
John Weihmann 
Eugene Cerceit 
Jerry Doran 
Lou Palmer 
Thos. Murphy 
Jim Cairns 
Jas. Hughes 

H. C. Ahlers 

I. L. Borden 
P. F. Kane 
Robert Bennett 
S. Sinsheimer 
W. F. Bennett 
A. F. Jackson 
P. W. Neiherin 
Gus Clotere 

S. H. Cowell 
F. Ruhstaller 



Carl Leonhardt 
H. P. Heagerty 
Geo. Whiteman 

E. D. Dudley 
M. Reardon 

Dr. J. M. Toner 
Jas. Donovan 
J. J. Coreghino 
Louis Herbst 
Rey Frehlson 
C. E. Blanchard 
H. D. Chase 
J. M. De Soto 
Ed. Kelly 
Pete Donnelly 
Al Joseph 

F. L. Matthes 
H. Munson 
Frank O'Shea 
Win. Ma'.ough 
J. C. Heenan 



THE NEW YORK HORSE MARKET. 

Inquiry among the leading firms in the local horse 
and carriage trade leads to the conclusion that nearly 
all branches of the business gained ground during 
the year just ended. 

J. D. Carroll, treasurer and general manager of 
the Fiss, Doerr & Carroll Horse Company, which is 
the largest concern of its kind in the world, esti- 
mates the increase in business at twenty-five per 
cent. 

"Our records for the year are not yet made up," 
he said yesterday, "but I feel sure that I am not 
wrong in saying our sales were one-fourth larger 
than in 1908. 

"What do I think of the outlook? Well, I believe 
that business will make greater gains this year than 
last. We find that nearly everybody who buys work 
horses is feeling better now than a year ago and I 
expect to sell a great many more horses. I will say 
also that I believe prices for all good horses will be 
higher than ever, especially for big rugged draught- 
ers of weight and quality. There was a time when I 
thought that draught horse values would have to 
drop, but it looks the other way now. The develop- 
ment of the country is going ahead at a rate that 
the breeders of big horses cannot keep up with, and 
so long as this continues prices must continue to 
climb." 

Contracts for three thousand horses to be deliv- 
ered before April 1 are on the books of the Fiss, 
Doerr t& Carroll Horse Company. Contractors, 
truckmen and brewers are the principal buyers, 
though the largest order to be filled is from one of 
the big express companies. James S. Connolly, the 
vice president and William McKinty, one of the 
directors, are in New York to consult with Mr. Car- 
roll about buying these horses, and both will return 
to the West in a few days to direct operations. 

Mr. McKinty, who came in from Kansas last week, 
reports high class horses extremely scarce and hard 
to buy for the New York market, values in the pros- 
perous Western corn belt ranging just about as high 
as in the Eastern cities. This fact is the great stum- 
bling block in the horse business at the present time, 
dealers here finding it difficult to make a fair profit 
after paying the prices current in the West and ship- 
ping their purchases half way across the continent. 

Speaking for Van Tassell & Kearney, who are prob- 
ably the largest holders af carriages in the United 
States, Edward W. Kearney said recently that their 
trade in pleasure vehicles had been at least twenty- 
five per cent better in 1909 than in 1908, while their 
private sales of horses, had made still greater gains 
last year. Mr. Kearney says that station rockaways 
and light carriages such as runabouts, surreys and 
other vehicles which the owner drives were the best 
sellers, though of late there has been a distinct de- 
mand for broughams and victorias. He is confident 
of a still better showing for the new year in the 
carriage trade. 

William Bradley, who is building two sections of 
the Fourth avenue subway, in Brooklyn, has placed 
an order with the Fiss, Dorr & Carroll Horse Com- 
pany, which is probably the largest of the kind ever 
known in the New York market. Mr. Bradley is par- 
tial to gray horses, because he says, they stand the 
heat better than dark colored ones and show at a 
glance when they are neglected by their grooms. He 
expects to use four hundred horses on his Brooklyn 
contract and one of the stipulations in placing the 
order with Fiss, Doerr & Carroll was that every 
horse supplied should be a gray. They will be of the 
highest grade used by contractors, every one weigh- 
ing upward of fifteen hundred pounds and possessing 
the extreme quality for which Mr. Bradley has always 
been a stickler.— N. Y. Herald. 



Eastern and central Washington stockmen are 
joining forces and rounding up range horses this 
winter, finding it much easier to corral them while 
the feed is poor and the horses weak, than it is In 
the spring after the grass grows. 



Frederick Remington, the artist, who died a few 
weeks ago, could portray the horse of the Western 
plains as used by the Indians, cowboys and Govern- 
ment troops, better than any other artist that ever 
lived. He knew the horses of the western country. 



.Rythmic 2:06% and Hal Raven 2:03% holds the 
records respectively as the fastest blind trotter and 
pacer. 



BAD FIRE AT PATCHEN WILKES FARM. 

A disastrous fire broke out at Patchen Wilkes 
stock farm on the night of December 29, about mid- 
night, totally destroying the large barn nearest the 
trotting track. The fire is supposed to have been 
caused by an explosion of natural gas which occurred 
in the room where a pumping engine was kept. There 
were two explosions close together. There were 
thirty-four brood mares in the barn but none of the 
help. The explosion awoke the attendants who lived 
two hundred yards away and also Manager Ed Wil- 
lis, who lives nearby but when he looked out the 
barn was already in flames. He was soon on the 
scene with his men but the fire had progressed so 
far that only five of the mares were rescued. In half 
an hour the $10,000 barn was reduced to ashes 
although heroic work was done by the workmen who 
worked a bucket brigade and saved all the other 
buildings. In one of these only seventy-five feet 
away were thirty-four mares which were all safety 
taken out as were the animals in the other barns. 
Peter the Great and the other stallions were in barns 
some distance away from the fire and completely out 
of danger. The loss is estimated at $50,000. 

The correct list of the mares destroyed by the fire 
is as follows: 

Alica Mater, b. m. (9) by Cecilian— Mae S. b*y Nut- 
wood. 

Alone (p) 2: 09 %, b. m (11) by Nearest— Grenette 
by Hambletonian Chrisman. 

Anita May, b. m. (13) by High wood — Hazel Cossack 
by Don Cossack. 

Belle Archer 2:12%, b. m. (22) by Rene— Mary 
Drake by Enfield. 

Daisy Onward, b. m. (11) by Onward — Daisy Belle 
by Crittenden. 

Fidelity, b. f. (3) by Todd— daughter of Ashland 
Wilkes. 

Great Mary, b. m. (4) by Peter the Great — Mary- 
Onward by Onward. 

Hilda McGregor, b. m. (3» by Bingen — Miss Mc- 
Gregor by Robert McGregor. 

Honey H. 2:19%, ch. m. (11) by Onward— Beulah 
by Harold. 

Kingsmantle 2:19%, br. m. (7) by May King— Mrs. 
Young by Wilkes Boy. 

Lady Affable, b. m. (7) by C. F. Clay— Molly the 
Gentle by Sir Walter. 

L'Empress 2:20V 2 , br. m. (21) by L'Empereur— 
Belle Stevens by Bald Chief. 

Louise McGregor, b. m. (8) by Oakland Baron — 
Niocelle by Robert McGregor. 

Lucille Wand, b. m. (15) by Wilkes Boy— Nelly H. 
by Young Jim. 

Lydia Thompson 2:20, b. m. (7) by Guy Wilkes— 
Eva by Sultan. 

Mary Audubon, ch. m. (6) by J. J. Audubon — Mary 
Marshall by Billy Wilkes. 

Miss Hudson, b. m. (4) by Nervolo — Flaxey by 
Bourbon Wilkes. 

Miss Lady Riley, ch. f. (2) by J. J. Audubon— Tosa 
by Enfield. 

Moy 2:07%, b. m. (7) by Prodigal — Minnine by 
Clay King. 

Newly 2:21V 2 , b. m. (10) by Stately— Nydia Wilkes 
by Baron Wilkes. 

Nonamie 2:06%, b. m. (14) by General Boyle — 
Althena by Altitude. 

Mora Malone, b. m. by Happy King — Cynthiana by 
Lord Russell. 

Nutwich, ch. m. (18) by Nutwood — Cadence by 
Harold. 

Ophelia Peter 2:19, b. f. (3) by Peter the Great- 
Marie Studholme by Onward. 

Oriana P. 2:17, b. m. (8) by Patchen Wilkes— 
Oriana by Onward. 

Princess Knight, br. m. (5) by Knight— Areol by 
Dexter Prince. 

Purple Onward, ch. m. (9) by Onward— Purple by 
Stamboul. 

Queen Vada, b. f. (3) by Twelfth Night— Scourine 
by Wilton. 

Tanta Buona 2:20%, b. m. (9) by King Wilkes— 
Debutante by Belmont. 
The Murderer, br. h. by Director— Bell Flower. 

GRAND CIRCUIT DATES SELECTED. 

Detroit, Mich., January 11.— The Grand Circuit rac- 
ing season for 1910 will open in Kalamazoo. Mich., 
July 25th. It is the first time since the organization 
of the Grand Circuit, fifteen years ago, that the pro- 
gram has been stalled outside of Detroit. An appli- 
cation from New York city for membership in the 
organization was accepted at the meeting today. 

The dates selected by the stewards are the follow- 
ing: 

Kalamazoo July 25 to 29 

Detroit Aug. 1 to 5 

Cleveland Aug. 8 to 12 

Buffalo Aug. 15 to 19 

New York Aug. 22 to 26 

Readville Aug. 29 to Sept. 2 

Hartford Sept. 5 to 9 

Syracuse Sept. 12 to 16 

Columbus Sept. 19 to 30 

This arrangement provides for ten weeks of rac- 
ing before the Lexington meeting which will have 
the same dates it had last year unless it should de- 
cide to take an earlier date. Last year Lexington 
opened on Monday, October 4th, but this year it will 
be one day earlier as the first Monday in October 
falls on the 3d. 

Robert N. Newton of Billings, Montana, was chosen 
presiding judge of the Grand Circuit for the coming 
season. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 16, 1910. 



NOTES AND NEWS I 



Sixty-four entries were made in the Occident 
Stake for foals of 1909 which closed on January 1st. 



Schermerhorn, by Blue Zero, he by Blue Bull, was 
16 years old last spring, yet he reduced his record 
from 2:08% to 2:07Vfe during the season. 



In Illinois and several other States where there is 
a stallion law it is a misdemeanor to print a stal- 
lion folder or poster without a duplicate of the 
State certificate or license printed thereon. 



Russia is the only nation in the world that has 
more horses than the United States. Russia has 
29,000,000, while this country has very close to 20,- 
000,000 



Chimes, the son of Electioneer and Beautiful Bells, 
that died in New Jersey on the 2d of this month, 
is the only stallion that has sired three trotters with 
records of 2:06 or better. The three are The Abbott 
2:03%, The Monk 2:05% and Fantasy 2:06. 



There is $10 due on two-year-olds entered in Pacific 
Breeders' Futurity No. 8, and it must be paid on or 
before February 1st, 1910, to keep the entries eligible 
to this stake. 



Dick McMahan is coming to California again this 
winter and is expected to arrive about the last of 
this month. He will probably be on the outlook for 
good racing prospects. 



Mr. Graham of Reedley, Cal., recently sold to a 
resident of that town, a full sister to Directly 2:03% 
with a colt at foot by Star Pointer for $350, and the 
colt was soon after sold for $180. 



The Chicago Horseman announces the renewal of 
its futurity, guaranteed to be worth $15,000 and as 
much more as is paid in by those making entries in 
excess of that amount. 



Nutwood 2:18% still ranks as the leading brood- 
mare sire. Returns up to date, give his daughters 
the credit of having produced 343 performers. 



Secretary Horace W. Wilson of the Kentucky Trot- 
ting Horse Breeders' Association, reports that 839 
youngsters are yet eligible to the 1911 Futurity. 



Canadian breeders of trotting horses are organiz- 
ing a society for the promotion of the light harness 
type, and the Dominion will shortly have a stud book 
for trotters, compiled under government supervision, 
independent of the American Trotting Register, pub- 
lished in Chicago. 



Two-Minute Villa, the large residence at the Two- 
Minute Stock Farm, located near Cleveland, Ohio, 
was on last Friday destroyed by fire. This farm was 
named in honor of Star Pointer 1:59%, whose home 
was there until he came to California a few years 
ago. 



Agricultural Park track at Los Angeles will prob- 
ably be torn up and the buildings wrecked during the 
next few weeks so that the new mile track and 
fair grounds may be laid out and work begun on them. 
The new Agricultural Park will be one of the finest 
in the United States. 



Fred H. Chase & Co. have received a number of 
consignments this week for the big Pleasanton sale 
in March. This promises to be the greatest sale ever 
held in California, and if you want your horses to 
have the benefit of early advertising better consign 
them as soon as possible. Write to Chase & Co. 
immediately. 



Among the young trotters whose races will be 
watched with much interest are Doctor Jones, by 
Captain McKinney, owned by J. D. Callery of Pitts- 
burg; this youngster is now coming around fine, and 
trotted many miles around 2:19 last fall. He is a 
very attractive horse in motion, especially, and will 
make a fast horse before long. 



The well known horse lover, Brayton Ives, who 
purchased the great trotting filly, Baroness Virginia 
(3) 2:08% at the recent Old Glory Sale, stated 
afterward that he admired her more than either Czar- 
evna or Soprano, and stood ready if necessary to 
pay more for her than the amount realized for either 
of the other two. 



If one glances at the fastest trotters of last year 
and pays particular attention to the best perform- 
ances of those ranging in age from one to five, in- 
clusive, the result is striking indeed. The champions 
for 1909 at their respective ages are. Miss Stokes (1) 
2:19%, Native Belle (2) 2:07%: Czarevna (3) 2:07%, 
The Harvester (4) 2:06%, and Uhlan (5) 2:02%. 



Mr. Joseph Hall, of Marshfield, Ohio, is now the 
owner of the fast pacing Bert Logan 2:16%, having 
purchased him from W. H. Stublefield Jr. of Oran, 
Mo. Mr. Hall will place him in the stud. Bert 
Logan was bred by Dr. A. W. Boucher of Pleasanton, 
who mated his mare, Miss Logan 2:06%, with Colbert 
•2:07V<! the last year he raced Miss Logan through 



Mr. A. S. Kellogg of Fresno has secured from Wil- 
liam Hashagen of Woodland the McKinney stallion 
Kinney Rose 2:13% and has shipped him to Fresno 
where he will make a season this year. Kinney Rose 
got his record in a race last year. He is a well bred 
stallion, his dam being by Falrose 2:19, sire of Don 
2:10, etc., and his second dam by Alaska, son of Elec- 
tioneer, third dam by Algona, the sire of Flying Jib 
2:04, and fourth dam by Odd Fellow. His colts are 
all well made handsome youngsters and have speed. 



There is considerable argument going on in trot- 
ting circles in and around Boston, Mass., as to the 
relative ability of Sonoma Girl 2:05% owned by 
Miss Lotta Crabtree and Bob Douglass 2:06%, the 
property of D. N. G. Hyams, both of that city and 
providing there is no stallion race included in the 
Readville exercises the coming season, a match be- 
tween the above two, will in all probability be ar- 
ranged. 



In noting the closing of Pacific Breeders' Futurity 
No. 10 with 341 nominations, the Chicago Horseman 
says: 'It is quite possible that Kentucky could to a 
futurity confined to the State beat these figures but 
we know of no other State in the Union that could 
secure such brilliant results. It shows that the new 
generation is alive to the commercial value of futuri- 
ties, and that they realize the immense value as an 
advertising medium of this class of stake over and 
above the money which can possibly be won." 



There is a law on the statutes of the State of 
California which provides for the establishment of 
agricultural districts and the holding of fairs which 
are to receive aid from the State treasury up to 
$5,000. While this law was passed at the last 
session of the Legislature, no money was appropri- 
ated for the purpose, but if the people interested in 
district or county fairs will organize and ask the 
next Legislature to make an appropriation, there is 
little doubt but the request will be granted. 



Zombro 2:11 will go east again April 1st and will 
make the season of 1910 at Lima, Ohio, which is the 
centre of a great horse breeding section, and the 
champion sire of race horses in 1909 should do well 
there. The fact that Zombro had thirteen new per- 
formers in 1909 that took their records in races puts 
him far ahead of his nearest competitor, his sire 
McKinney. in this respect. Twenty of Zombro's get 
won money in races this year, a wonderful showing. 
Zombro's fee will be $100 for 1910. 



Hon. B. F. Rush, State Senator from Solano county, 
and one of the directors of the California State Agri- 
cultural Society, was in town this week attending a 
meeting of the Pacific District Board of Appeals of 
the National Trotting Association, of which he is a 
member. Senator Rush has secured from Thos. 
Smith of Vallejo, the use of the latter's McKinney 
stallion Gen. J. B. Frisbie for this season, and will 
breed him to a number of the Demonio fillies on the 
Suisun Stock Farm, owned by Rush & Haile. Gen. 
J. B. Frisbie is standard and registered and is a full 
brother to that good race horse and successful sire 
Tom Smith 2:13%. Gen. J. B. Frisbie will be per- 
mitted to serve a few outside mares at $25 the season. 



F. H. Metz, the popular harness dealer and horse 
breeder of Sacramento, has started jogging his 
horses Major McKinley and Dr. Cook by Stam B. 
and will also give his Nushagak colt a chance to 
show himself this season. Major McKinley will be 
entered all through the circuit and it will take a fast 
green trotter to beat him judging by his race in the 
2:21 class at Woodland last summer where he was 
not beaten much although the five heats were from 
2:13% to 2:16. 



Chas. A. Durfee sold this week to R. Grimmon of 
Reno, Nevada, the black pacing mare by Dexter 
Prince that he trained a little at Pleasanton last 
year. This is a fine looking mare, with a high rate 
of speed and though never entered in a race, looks 
like a good racing prospect. She is elegantly bred 
being out of the mare Countess by McKinney 2:11%, 
second dam Miss Valensin, (Jam of Zarina 2:13%, 
Drey fuss 2:17, Crown Prince 2:22%, erj. She is 
an elegant road mare and can lie driven by anyone, 
anywhere, as she is not afraid jf anything 



Alone 2:09% was destroyed by fire on December 
29th at Patchen Wilkes Farm, Lexington, Kentucky, 
when one of the largest barns on the farm 
was burned together with twenty-seven brood mares. 
Alone was bred in California by T. W. Barstow, of 
San Jose, who raced her to her record. She was by 
Nearest 2:22%, brother to John A. McKerron 2:04^, 
and was a grand big mare that wore nothing but the 
hopples and could pace better than a two-minute gait 
any time. She was purchased at the Pleasanton 
sale last spring by Mr. F. J. Kilpatrick who used her 
on the speedway in New York for a while and then 
sold her to Mr. Stokes who intended breeding her 
this spring to Peter the Great. The mare Moy 2:07% 
which Mr. Kilpatrick also purchased here for Mr. 
Stokes, was likewise destroyed in this disastrous fire. 



A. Ottinger of this city has purchased from W. 
Michelson. the well known liveryman and dealer, a 
four-year-old filly by Merry Mac 2:19% (son of Mc- 
Kinney 2:11%) dam Tubelina by Tuberose 2:25%, 
second dam Lena Holly by Mountain Boy 4891. This 
filly was bought by Mr. Michelson, who is a good 
judge of a horse, at the dispersal sale of the horses 
belonging to Mr. A. B. Rodman of Woodland, held 



by Fred H. Chase & Co., in this city on the 25th of 
last October. Mr. Ottinger saw Mr. Michelson driv- 
ing the mare on the road and became struck with 
her resemblance in syle, gait, etc., to his old favorite 
race horse Ottinger 2:09% trotting, and 2:16 pacing, 
and it did not take him long to become her owner. 
He says she can trot a quarter in better than 33 
seconds now and he will drive her a mile in 2:20 
within six weeks. Mr. Ottinger is highly pleased 
with his purchase and will probably name her for 
his daughter Leila Ottinger. The mare is a hand- 
some brown and was foaled in 1906. She was called 
Merrylina in the sale catalogue, but as she has 
never been entered or started in a race Mr. Ottinger 
has the right to give her any name he chooses. 



The annual New Year's matinee of the Riverside 
Driving Club, was impossible on account of the in- 
clement weather, but the usual banquet was held 
Saturday evening at Hotel Holyrod. The gentlemen 
gathered around the pleasant tables which were 
loaded with seasonable dainties. A complete turkey 
dinner was served in the charming manner which is 
a part of the Holyrood hospitality. The dining hall 
was decorated in pepper boughs and choice cut 
flowers, presenting a most artistic effect. At the 
close of the banquet a business session was held in 
the hotel parlors. President J. F. Backstrand pre- 
sided. In the absence of John Garner, F. S. Pond 
was made secretary pro tern. After a discussion it 
was practically decided that the club will lease the 
driving park another year. 



E. Stewart & Co., the well known livestock auction- 
eers, will hold a sale of three car loads of mares and 
geldings from the Brown Ranch, Wagon Tire Moun- 
tain, Oregon, at their sales pavilion, 297 Valencia 
street, on Tuesday next at 1:00 p. m. and 7:30 p. m. 
These horses weigh from 1000 to 1400 pounds and are 
from 4 to 6 years old and all broke to work. At th;> 
same time and place the firm will sell three car load.-? 
of heavy draft mares and geldings, from 4 to 8 years 
old, weighing from 1400 to 1700 pounds, from the J. 
Frank Adams ranch, Klamath county, Oregon. Theso 
are a very choice lot, all gentle and in fine order. 
These horses are now on exhibition at the pavilion. 
At the same sale a very handsome outfit consisting of 
carriages, harness, team and two victories will also be 
offered. The sale is January 18th, at 1:00 and 
7:30 p. m. 

o 

That there was a persistent and fateful "hoodoo" at- 
tending the lamented Hamburg Belle and her dam 
Sally Simmons is evident from the hitherto unpub- 
Mshed account of the two mares furnished by E. T. 
Bedford, who owned both. The New York fancier 
purchased Sally Simmons from the estate of Major 
Samuel T. Dickinson and used her on the road for 
several years. After she was retired from active 
service her later career, as stated by Mr. Bedford, 
was as follows: 

"Sally Simmonds was first sent to Quartermaster 
and bred in the early spring. She came in season 
again later in the fall and was bred again, and the re- 
sult was that she foaled two colts, both dead, one 
from the first service fully formed and the other but 
partly so. After the death of Quartermaster she was 
sent to Axworthy and later on, with Black Ide, who 
had been bred to Brown Master, was shipped to John 
E. Madden's farm at Lexington. 

She was then served by Arion and when within 
two months of foaling slipped on the ice, broke both 
her hind legs and had to be destroyed. These two 
colts, one by Brown Master, Raffles, and Hamburg 
Belle, were developed at Wynfromere Farm. Raffles 
was sold to Mr. Buckley, of Southport, getting a re- 
cord of 2:11%. A half interest in Sally Simmons 
Second, as she was then called, after she got a record 
of 2:12% at Mineola in 1907, was sold to John E. 
Madden at $2500, I telling him that she certainly 
would trot in 2:05. Later on the other half was sold 
to him at the same price. 

Hamburg Belle was sick during her two-year-old 
form so that we not only did not think we could raise 
her, but often wished that she might not live. She 
was so weak that at times she had to be fed lying 
down. She recovered in the late summer, and as a 
two-year-old, in November, I drove her a quarter to a 
road cart on a half-mile track in 37 seconds. The 
next year I drove her as a three-year-old a half in 
1:08%. She then got speed crazy and I turned her 
over too my farm superintendent, R. L. Williams, 
who, with great patience and care, develooped her 
both as a four and five-year-old. As a five-year-old 
she was entered in several important stakes but 
went lame and had to be withdrawn. We were never 
able to tell just where her lameness was. It seemed 
in the nature of a nerve lameness." — Trotter and 
Pacer. 

o 

A biennial meeting or congress of members of the 
National Trotting Association will be held at the 
Murray Hill Hotel, New York, at noon, Wednesday, 
February 9, 1910, in accordance with Article VII, 
Sec. 1, of the by-laws. 

N. B. — In accordance with a resolution adopted by 
the twenty-fourth congress, the committee on cre- 
dentials, which the president was authorized and 
directed to appoint, will meet at the Murray Hill 
Hotel, at 9 o'clock a. m. on Wednesday, February 
9, 1910, to receive credentials from delegates to the 
twenty-fifth congress of members of the National 
Trotting Association. 

Any proposed changes in the rules should be sent 
to the secretary prior to February 4, to be submitted 
to the rule committee, which will be in session on 
February 7 and 8, 1910. 



Saturday, January 15, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



A CHAMPION RACE HORSE IN THE STUD. 



Jim Logan, the colt that broke all world's records 
for three-year-olds by pacing the third heat of a 
race in a field of aged horses in 2:05% last August, 
after winning the first and second heats of the race 
in 2:09%, will be in ihe stud at Pleasanton this 
spring at a service fee of $50. 

This simple announcement should be sufficient 
to fill his book with mares whose owners desire to 
breed a stake winning pacer, as while there are 
many theories advanced as to the best way to breed 
a winner, the old plan of breeding to the winners 
has never been improved upon. The record of Jim 
Logan has never been equalled by any three-year-old 
pacer in the world. He started in three races last 
year and was never headed after he poked his nose 
in front in any of the nine heats he paced, and as 
he won every race he started in, and won them 
in straight heats, he must be given the palm as the 
greatest three-year-old pacer ever foaled. One of 
the marvelous features of this record is that in two 
of these races he was up against a field of aged 
horses, beating such fast ones as Demonio Wilkes 
2:09% and Tom Murphy 2:09% in one race and the 
good money winner, Adam G. 2:06%, and others in 
another. When a three-year-old colt can meet a field 
of seasoned, aged race horses and beat them two 
heats in succession in the fast time of 2:09%, as 
one after another takes him the mile, and can then 
come back the third heat in which he is raced every 
step of the way by the largest money winning aged 
pacer of the circuit, in the world's record time of 
2:05%, we think he is entitled to be called the great- 
est three-year-old pacer ever foaled. This is what 
Jim Logan did, and there is nothing that can be said 
in praise of his performances that will be as elo- 
quent and convincing as the simple summaries of 
his three-year-old races which are here appended: 
At Salinas, Cal., Aug. 4, 1909. 

Pacific Breeders' Futurity for three-year-old pacers, 



$1300. 

Jim Logan, b. c. by Chas. Derby 1 1 1 

Teddy Bear, b. c. by Del Coronado 2 2 2 

Time— 2:15%, 2:J6%, 2:13%. 
At Pleasanton, Aug. 12, 1909. 
Pacing, special, $400. 

Jim Logan, b. c. by Chas. Derby 1 1 1 

Demonio Wilkes, b. s. by Demonio 3 2 2 

Tom Murphy, br. g. by Gossiper 2 4 3 

Geo. Woodard, b. g 4 3 4 

Time— 2:17%, 2:11%, 2:11%. 
At Woodland, Aug. 18, 1909. 
Pacing, 2:20 class, $700. 

Jim Logan, b. c. by Chas. Derby 1 1 1 

Adam G., b. g. by McKinney 4 2 2 

Freely Red, b. m. by Red Medium 2 4 3 

Grace R., b. m. by Demonio 3 3 4 

Alto Genoa Jr., blk. s. by Alto Genoa 5 5 5 



Time— 2:09%, 2:09%, 2:05%. 
If there is any more eloquent testimony to the 
speed and gameness of a three-year-old colt than 
the above summaries we don't know where it can be 
found. His first race was the leading three-year-old 
stake of the year on the coast, and the other two 
were class events for horses of all ages — it is a 
wonderful record. 

But while Jim Logan is a great race horse, he is 
also one of the best bred pacers living. He was 
sired by Chas. Derby 2:20, a stallion that is by 
Steinway out of the great Electioneer brood mare 
Katie G., that produced Klatawah 2:05%, the only 
other three-year-o'.d that ever beat 2:06. Derby has 
eight 2:10 performers to his credit. The sire of 
Chas. Derby is Steinway 2:25% as a three-year-old, 
who has sired six 2:10 performers, and the sire of 
Steinway is Strathmore with two 2:10 performers 
and the dams of eighteen 2:10 performers to his 
credit. The dam of Jim Logan (3) 2:05% is Effie 
Logan, a mare that has also produced Sir Albert S. 
2:03% and Dan Logan, a young stallion that won 
a matinee race last summer in 2:12%. Effie Logan 
was by Durfee, a son of Kaiser 2200, he by Geo. 
Wilkes out of a Dictator mare. Durfee is the sire 
or Shecam 2:12% and Kaiser is sire of the dam of 
Coney 2:02 etc., while Dictator sired the great race 
horse and sire Director 2:17 and the dams of Nancy 
Hanks 2:04 and other great trotters. 

The dam of Effie Logan was Ripple, a sister to 
Creole 2:15, sire of Javelin 2:08%, and she was by 
Prompter, sire of the dams of Gratt 2:02% and 
others. Ripple's dam was Grace, a wonderful brood 
mare by Buccaneer. Grace produced Daedalion 
2:08% and Creole 2:15, and her sister Lettie pro- 
duced Welcome 2:10% and Wayland W. 2:12%, 
the latter the sire of Bolivir 2:00%, the fastest pacer 
ever bred on the Pacific Coast. 

The next dam of Jim Logan was old Mary by 
Flaxtail, one of the greatest broodmares that ever 
lived. Besides having two daughters, each of which 
produced two 2:15 performers, her descendants in 
the 2:10 list are very numerous and new additions 
are being made to the list almost every year. From 
Mary the pedigree runs into thoroughbred blood 
which is recognized by all breeders nowadays as the 
best foundation for race winning and record break- 
ing trotting and pacing families. 

With such a record as a race horse, and with such 
speed producing and race winning blood in his veins, 
Jim Logan is certain to sire colts and fillies that 
will be up in the front rank of the money winners 
of the future. 

The advertisement which his owner, Mr. J. E. 
Montgomery, has placed in this issue, gives full par- 
ticulars as to service fees, etc. 



ORIGINAL ENTRIES OCCIDENT STAKE OF 1912. 

The following sixty-three entries of foals of 1909 
were made in the Occident Stake of 1912, which 
closed on January 1st, this year: 

Frank E. Alley's ch. c. Michael Angelo by Sonoma 

Boy — Angelina Boswell. 
Frank E. Alley's br. f. Minnehaha by Sonoma Boy — 

Gussie J. W. 

Frank E. Alley's ch. c. King Dixon by Diawood — 
Minnie H. 

F. E. Emlay's b. f. Birdie McK. by Washington Mc- 
Kinney — Bird W. 

Wm. L. Anderson's b. s. Daniel Zolock by Zolock — 
Just It. 

Mrs. S. V. Barstow's br. c. Near It by Nearest — 
Babe. 

Mrs. S. V. Barstow's br. f. Belle Ammen by Nearest 
McKinney — Aunt Joe. 

L. G. Bonfilio's b. f. by Copa de Oro— Vela Mc- 
Kinney. 

Alex Brown's r. f. by Prince Ansel— Serpolo. 
Alex Brown's b. f. by Prince Ansel — Everette. 
Alex Brown's b. f. by Prince Ansel — Bonnie Derby. 
Alex Brown's br. c. by Nushagak — Nosegay. 

F. H. Burke's b. f. Mabel Claire by Conductor — Lady 

Belle Isle. 
C. A. Canfield's b. f. by El Volante— Sue. 
C. A. Canfield's ch. c. by El Volante— Chloe. 
C. A. Canfield's b. c. by Walter Barker — Dixie W. 
A. G. Dahl's br. c. Zomjud by Zombro — Judith. 
E. D. Dudley's ch. c. Enchalada by Palite — Paprika. 
A. R. Fraser's b. c. by Del Coronado — Rose of Peru. 
W. G. Durfee's b. c. by Carlokin — Lady H. 
A. Morris Fosdick's b. f. Lulu Kinney, by Kinney 

Lou — Athene. 

Robert Garside's blk. c. Chanate by Alconda Jay — 
Dora McKinney. 

T. S. Glide's — by Greco B.— Fannie G. 

T. S. Glide's — by Greco B. — Josephine. 

Hemet Stock Farm's ch. c. Chestnut Lou by Kinney 
Lou — Louise Carter. 

Hemet Stock Farm's br. c. Hemet by Geo. W. Mc- 
Kinney — Lady Zombro. 

Hemet Stock Farm's br. f. by Lord Alwin — Mora 
Mac. 

H. S. Hogoboom's b. c. His Highness by Palo King- 
Queen Alto. 

H. S. Hogoboom's b. f. Busy Body by Iran Alto — 
Diawalda. 

John Hogan's ch. f. Ruby Mac by Diamond Mac — 
Babe. 

H. Imhof's ch. c. Prince Malone by Kinney Lou — 

Princess Bessum. 
E. P. Iverson's s. f. Ann Lisbeth by Highland C — 

Queen Karen. 
J. B. Iverson's s. c. Salinas Star by Nutwood Wilkes 

— Ivoneer. 

M. C. Keefer's b. c. McAnsel by Prince Ansel — 
Annie McKinney. 

Kincaid & Rickel"s ch. f. Ruby Lace by Prince Love- 
lace — Special Belle. 

C. W. Main's b. c. St. Patrick by Del Coronado — 
Kate Hamilton. 

Mastin & Kerr's s. f. Queen Ansel by Prince Ansel 
— Nuvola. 

Ray Mead's b. f. Bon Bonita by Bon Voyage — Car- 
rie B. 

A. B. Miller's br. c. Dr. R. by On Stanley— Belle 
Raymon. 

A. B. Miller's b. c. Alex W. by Oh So— Lillian Wel- 
born. 

Mosher & London's f. Fostena Todd by Baronteer 

Todd — Zolahka. 
Dana Perkins' ch. c. Golden State by Stam B. — Zaya. 
Dana Perkins' b. c. by Stam B — Princess Eulalie. 
Oakwood Park Stock Farm's b. c. by Stillwell — 

Prosperina. 

Oakwood Park Stock Farm's b. c. by Stillwell — 
Nazoma. 

Oakwood Park Stock Farm's b. C. by Chas. Derby — 
Pippa. 

A. L. Scott's b. f. Louise by Nutwood Wilkes— Cora. 
Henry Struve's b. f. Princess Jay by Alconda Jay — 
Princess. 

John Suglian's blk. c. Booster by Tom Smith — Foxey. 
L. H. Todhunter's br. f. by Almaden — The Silver 
Belle. 

L. H. Todhunter's b. c. by Almaden— Loma B. 
L. H. Todhunter's b. c. by Almaden — Zomitella. 
.1. H. Torrey's br. c. Joe Todd by Baronteer Todd — 
Bessie T. 

W. E. Tuttle's b. f. by Stam B. — Lulu McAIto. 
W. E. Tuttle's c. by Stam B. — Maud McAIto. 
Valencia Farm's b. c. by Copper King — La Belle H. 
Vendome Stock Farm's b. m. Miss Alto Weller by 

Nearest McKinney — Much Better. 
Geo. L. Warlow's br. c. by Stanford McKinney — 

Cora Wickersbam. 
Geo. L. Warlow's b. c. by Athasham — Soisette. 

G. W. Whitman's br. f. Oma Jay by Alconda Jay— 

Nushoma. 

C. H. Williams' blk. f. by Unimak— Miss Mascot. 
C. H. Williams' b. c. by Unimak— Alleta Net. 
J. W. Zibbell's b. f. by Tom Smith— Kate Lumry. 

o 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



William McDonald, Livermore. — Speculation 928, 
was sired by Hambletonian 10, dam Martha Wash- 
ington, the dam of Whipple's Hambletonian, by 
Burr's Washington, son of Burr's Napoleon, second 
dam by Abdallah 1. Alexander 490 was by Geo. 
M. Patchen Jr. 31, dam Lady Cnim by Brown's Bell- 
founder. 



AT SACRAMENTO'S GREAT WINTER TRACK. 

The track of the California State Agricultural So- 
ciety is undoubtedly one of the best winter tracks 
in the world. The boys may make fun of it in Au- 
gust and September, when a lack of water has here- 
tofore made it rather slow, but when it conies to a 
winter training course there is none in the State 
that has anything over it. No time this winter 
have we had to stay off the track on account of 
wet weather. In fact the track is now very fast 
and safe. The barns are first class, there is good 
water, warm stables, a car line with frequent cars 
to the gate, and a booming city to live in — in short 
all any first class horseman wants to make work 
and life enjoyable. I know there are a lot of train- 
ers "from Missouri" and if they will just drop in 
any time we will "show" them. 

James Thompson has nine head and as he is jog- 
ging he wears a pleasant smile, for all his colts are 
in fine order and are rounding too very fast, so before 
many days he will be stepping them along some. 

William Ivey has four head in his stalls, among 
them that splendid son of James Madison 2:17%, 
Lijero 45923, owned by that popular horseman, Frank 
Wright. This stallion was foaled in 1902 and is out 
of the great brood mare Hilda, dam of two standard 
trotters and one producing site. Hilda is by the 
great Nutwood 600, the greatest broodmare sire that 
ever lived, and her dam is Eudora by Volunteer 55, 
so you will see that Lijero is mighty well bred. He 
has always had speed and took a matinee record of 
2:21% trotting. There is no question but he will be 
a good sire. Mr. Ivey is training the brown filly 
Expedio by him that is now a three-year-old. In 
her two-year-old form last summer she stepped a 
mile in 2:30 on, the trot after only two months' 
work. She belongs to Dr. Weldon of this city. She 
is out of a mare by Knight. In Ivey's stable there 
is also a bay filly by Stam B. 2:11% out of a mare 
by Knight, that with six weeks work has trotted a 
quarter in 43 seconds and an eighth in 20 seconds. 

Walter Tryon has five good colts, one a three-year- 
old bay stallion by Iran Alto 2:12%, dam by Diablo 
2:09% that has trotted a quarter in 38 seconds; a 
brown gelding by Almaden 2:22% out of a thorough- 
bred mare that is about as "toppy" a horse as one 
wants to see. a filly by Nutwood Wilkes that can step 
like all good ones by that great sire; a filly by Arthur 
W. 2:11%, dam a thoroughbred mare; and a filly by 
Azmoor 2:20, sire of Moortrix (4) 2:07%, that knows 
nothing but trot, as Moortrix knows nothing but 
pace. 

John Quinn has the contented mind that is a 
winner, and there is reason for it. At the head of 
his string is Hymettus 2:07, the Zombro gelding. 
This pacer is big and strong; he has had a free 
and easy time of it since the races and seems to 
enjoy this "prep" for steady training. And Sweet 
Bow (2) 2:17%; how well she looks. She is as sweet 
as her name sounds, and has also taken the free 
and easy way since the 1909 campaign, and looks as 
if she will be in the lead in 1910. Quinn has a 
black two-year-old filly by Bon Voyage, dam by 
Stam B., that would make any one like her, a two- 
year-old by Zombro, dam also by Stam B. that has 
all the good points of her sire; Almutz by Zombro, 
dam by Prince Norfolk; the three-year-old Zaza 
by Zombro that will be a sure winner if it trots ac- 
cording to its looks; a three-year-old by Bon Voy- 
age, dam Mary Benton that belongs to Mr. W. O. 
Bowers, the popular hotel man, that is as good as 
any colt on the track, and a very fine two-year-old 
by Zombro, dam by Diablo, second dam the famous 
broodmare Trix by Nutwood Wilkes that belongs to 
Mr. James Marshall of Dixon. Quinn has not stepped 
any fast quarters yet, but as all the colts are staked 
and show a lot of speed, some one will have to step 
to beat him. 

W. A. Hunter does not feel that he is out in the 
cold, as his three-year-old filly Martha Dean, is doing 
nice work, has a lot of speed and loves to go the 
route. She was sired by Money Mack 2:19%, dam 
Lady B., by Stephen A. In the Hunter string is a 
fine looking colt by Turban, dam Lady B., that he 
has just started jogging and will command notice. 
Mr. Hunter has six head of gaited saddle horses he 
is schooling, among them Artist Jr., a saddle stal- 
lion imported to this coast by Judge E. A. Bridg- 
ford of San Francisco, Paris B., a gelding also im- 
ported from the east and now owned by Geo. Walsh 
of Sacramento. Hunter is also schooling Al Lind- 
ley, a thoroughbred owned by Col. H. I. Seymour 
of Sacramento, another owned by Mr. Jos. Terry of 
Sacramento, and two of his own. Hunter works 
his trotters in the forenoon, but finds the saddlers 
keep out of mischief by working them in the after- 
noons. 

Within the next, month we expect that several 
trainers will move to this track and that every 
string here in training will receive several acquisi- 

CAPITAUON. 

o 

"FBRNLOC." 

The Forestine Company of Williamsport, Pa., manu- 
facturers of the Fernloc, report that they are doing 
a good business on the Pacific Coast. Tills remedy 
Is very popular throughout the Bast, where it has 
been used for a longer time than in California, and is 
highly recommended bv such trainers as K. Oeers, 
!•' MeOuIre, ('has. De Ryder, and many others. Those 
who use It claim that it will Increase speed, stimulates, 
strengthens, Induces a healthy circulation, and pre- 
vents congestion, and removes soreness, rheumatism, 
inflammation and stiffness from muscles and tendons. 
It does not stain or blister, but. Instead, pro luces a 
Smooth, healthy skin and hair. See advertisement In 
another part of the paper. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL 



CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT. 



A. K. C. DIRECTORS' MEETING. 



The board of directors of the American Kennel 
Club held at meeting in New York December 21, 1909. 

Present: J. VV. Appleton, .lohn E. DeMund, Row- 
land P. Keasbey. John G. Bates, James Mortimer, 
H. K. Bloodgood, Chetwood Smith, Hollis H. Hun- 
newell, William C. Codman, George Lander, Jr., 
Dwight Moore, B. S. Smith. Howard VVillets and 
Franklin B. Lord, Jr. On motion, the minutes of the 
last meeting were accepted as published in the 
"Gazette." The secretary read his report as follows: 

New York, Dec. 20, 1909. 
To the Board of Directors. 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor to report upon the 
following matters which have been filed with this 
office since our last meeting: 

On October 6, 1909, the Asbury Park Kennel Club 
requested to be dropped from the roll of membership, 
for the reason that it had ceased to exist as a club. 

On December 13, 1909, the Western Bull Terrier 
Breeders' Association tendered its resignation. The 
above clubs are in good standing and I would recom- 
mend that their requests be complied with. 

On December 13, 1909, the Sheepshead Bay Kennel 
Club requested to be dropped from the roll of mem- 
bership for the reason that it has ceased to exist as 
a club. 

At the Bangor show of 1908 Mr. R. J. Chase was 
suspended for removing his dogs without permission. 
Under date of December 18, 1909, Mr. Tom B. 
Middlehrooke, secreetary and superintendent of said 
show, requests the reinstatement of Mr. Chase, 
believing that he has been sufficiently punished, and 
at the time his offense was committed he did not 
realize the graveness of it. 

The American Poultry Association solicits the co- 
operation of the American Kennel Club to take up 
with the express companies the question of rates, 
uniform dispatch in shipping, prompt delivery, feed 
and water en route and protection from exposure. 

The Tri-State Fair held a dog show at Memphis, 
Tenn., October 4 to 9, 1909, and published in its 
premium lists and catalogue the rules of the Ameri- 
can Kennel Club, the classification and my certificate 
of approval guaranteeing for championship recoord 
one point. This club was neither a member nor was 
it licensed. It did not send its classification for 
approval and never received a certificate of approval 
signed by me as published. Undoubtedly many ex- 
hibitors believed the statement that the American 
Kennel Club santioned its show. I called upon the 
secretary, Mr. R. M. Williams, to show cause why the 
officers of the Tri-State Pair should not be dis- 
qualified for inducing entries under false pretenses 
and the fraudulent use of the American Kennel Club 
rules and the secretary's name. The reply to this 
communication states "that the Tri-State Fair sold 
outright for a consideration of $250 to J. M. Avent, 
Hickory, Tenn., the exclusive right to hold and con- 
duct a dog show on the fair ground, presuming that 
he knew what he was doing, and feeling that with 
his standing and reputation we were fully protected 
therein." 

This is a very serious matter, and such action 
should be taken as may be deemed proper. 

The Pacific Advisory Committee called upon the 
San Francisco Kennel Club to explain certain irregu- 
larities found in the catalogue of its late show, and 
also called upon William Ellery, an exhibitor, to 
explain nine (9) interlineations in his collie entries 
as found in the official catalogue of the San Francisco 
show. Both the San Francisco Kennel Club and Wil- 
liam Ellery ignored the action of the Pacific Advisory 
Committee and applied to the Superior Court of the 
State of California for a temporary injunction 
restraining the Pacific Advisory Committee from tak- 
ing any action in the matter. An application is 
still pending before the court for a permanent 
injunction. I called the attention of Mr. August 
Belmont, president of the American Kennel Club, to 
the action above stated, and such proceeding appear- 
ing to him to be conduct prejudicial to the best in- 
terests of the American Kennel Club, he suspended 
the San Francisco Kennel Club and its officers, Wil- 
lim Ellery and the Valverde Kennels until such time 
as the charges for alleged misconduct can be 
investigated by competent authority. Mr. Belmon't 
action was taken under the provision of rule 21, rules 
governing dog shows adopted in 1907, and will remain 
in force until January 1, 1910. 

I have given merely an outline of the matter and 
will submit voluminous correspondence, which goes 
into the details fully, for your due consideration. In 
connection with the above case, I beg to say that we 
have found another discrepancy in Mr. William 
Ellery's entry of the collie, Valverde Virgil, which 
was entered at San Francisco as having been whelped 
May 18, 1908, and at Oakland as whelped on May 27, 
1908, this entry was in the puppy class. 

The following charges have been filed: Carrie E. 
Lamouree vs. Harry R. Kendall. Bulldog Club of 
America vs. Charles G. Hopton. Both cases for mis- 
conduct in connection with dogs. 

Charles J. Best vs. New Castle County Agricultural 
Fair Association, G. A. Wertheim vs. Monmouth 
County K. A. C, A. B. Dalby vs. York Kennel Club, 



John F. Crowell vs. Farmingham District K. C, 
Anna Sands vs. Plainfield K. C, J. Cooper Mott vs. 
Cedarhurst K. C. These cases are for unpaid specials. 

Five other charges for unpaid specials were filed, 
but were satisfied through the efforts of the Ameri- 
can Kennel Club. 

Pursuant to the resolution of your board at its 
September meeting I suspended the Merrimack Valley 
K. C. and its officers and the Buffalo K. C. and its 
officers for the non-payment of special prizes. The 
officers of the Merrimack Valley K. C. ignored all 
communications from this office, and so far as I 
know have never made any effort to pay their just 
obligations. With the Buffalo K. C, however, I am 
assured that it has made every effort to pay a cup 
donated by Mrs. C. E. Proctor, but were unable to 
locate her. In this connection I received a letter from 
Mrs. Proctor on the 17th instant, in which she in- 
forms me that the communications from the Buffalo 
club had just reached her, they having been mis- 
directed. She states that she will pay the cup to the 
winner, after the holidays, so that the same may be 
suitably marked. 

John W. Patten and Edmund L. McKenzie pre- 
sented to the club framed pictures, which were 
valuable acquisitions to our collection, and official 
thanks are due these gentlemen for their courtesy. 

The secretary then submitted the correspondence 
in the matter of Mr. R. J. Chase, who was suspended 
for removing his dogs from the Bangor show at 1908. 
Moved that he be reinstated and the motion seconded 
and carried. 

The secretary brought before the directors tht mat- 
ter of the dog show held by the Tri-State Fair at 
Memphis, Tenn., on October 4 to 9, 1909, stating that 
said association had published in its premium list 
and catalogue the rules of the American Kennel Club, 
the classification and his certificate of approval 
guaranteeing for championship record one point. 
Also the fact that this club was neither a member of 
the American Kennel Club, nor was it licensed, and 
that it did not send its classification for approval, and 
never received a certificate of approval signed by him 
as published. That being called upon by him to 
show cause why the officers of the Tri-State Fair 
should not be disqualified for inducing entries under 
false pretences and the fraud"lent use of the Ameri- 
can Kennel Club's rules and also the use of his name, 
Mr. R. M. Williams, the secretary of said show, 
replied that the Tri-State Fair sold outright for a con- 
sideration of $250 to J. M. Avent, of Hickory, Tenn., 
the exclusive right to hold and conduct a dog :,how 
on the fair grounds, presuming that he knew what 
he was doing and feeling that with his standing and 
reputation they were fully protected therein. On 
motion of Mr. Chetwood Smith the matter was re- 
ferred to the New York Trial Board. 

The Secretary: Charges have been filed for un- 
paid special by Charles J. Best vs. New Castle County 
Agricultural Fair Association, F. A. Wertheim vs. 
Monmouth County Kennel Club, A. B. Dalby vs. York 
Kennel Club, John F. Crowell vs. Framingham Dis- 
trict Kennel Club, Anna Sands vs. Plainfield Ken- 
nel Club, and J. Cooper Mott vs. Cdearhurst Kennel 
Club. 

Dr. DeMund: I move that they be given thirty 
days in which to pay these specials, in default of 
which said clubs and their officers be disqualified. 
Motion seconded and carried. 

The Secretary: The Buffalo Kennel Club and its 
officers were suspended for non-payment of prizes, 
and I submit to you the correspondence from said 
club and Mrs. Proctor, the donor of the prize. The 
American Kennel Club had nothing whatever to do 
with it. Today I received a letter from the Buffalo 
Kennel Club in which it is stated that they have done 
everything within their power to procure this prize 
cup from Mrs. Proctor, but had so far been unable to 
do so. I would like to say that I am really liable 
to censure because I was given thirty days to suspend 
these men. Within those thirty days I received let- 
ters from them in which they say that they have made 
every effort to locate Mrs. Proctor, and 1 finally gave 
them Mr. Proctor's address, at 149 Broadway, and 
they wrote to him, as he now states, and instead of 
suspending them after thirty days. I waited until sixty 
days had elapsed and then suspended them. This is 
the result. All of the officers who are dog showing 
men, and the club itself, which has a claim in for next 
spring, are suspended, and they cannot show or hold 
a show. 

Mr. Mortimer: Is it possible to prefer charges 
against the donor of a special prize who does not pay 
it? The club itself has done everything in its power 
to get this special paid. It seems to me the donor 
of the special is the one that is to blame instead of 
the club. 

Mr. Chetwood Smith: It seems that this is a cup 
which is given to various shows, to be later returned. 
I do not see how you can hold the club responsible, 
because it has to deliver it to the individual that 
wins it, and they hold it for a year. 

The Secretary: That is an old time matter with 
us. The club advertises a certain special which may 
be the inducement for a man to enter his dog at that 
show. He does not care who donates the cup. It 
is the show giving club that offers that special, and 



[Saturday, January 15, 1910. 



it is one of the conditions of the agreement made 
between the exhibitor and the club, for which a 
monetary consideration is paid, and therefore the 
club is held responsible, which is proper in my opin- 
ion. 

Mr. Mortimer: If I may be allowed to explain, 
these cups that are put up to be won at the different 
shows are never at any time in the possession of the 
club. They are retained by the donor of the cup. 

The Chairman: No, I do not quite agree with 
you there. 

Mr. Codman: They should be sent to the club. 

Mr. Mortimer: The club seldom has possession of 
the cup, and it is never won. It goes on record with 
the secretary of the club, and he notifies the donor 
that a certain exhibitor has won this cup. I suppose 
this cup has been won three times or more by this 
same exhibitor. 

The Chairman: It looks as if it was won outright 
and never existed. 

Mr. Mortimer: I move that in view of the fact 
that the Buffalo Kennel Club has done everything in 
its power to hand, over this cup to the winner, no 
blame attaches to it, and that the suspension of the 
Buffalo Kennel Club be now removed, and that Mrs. 
Proctor, the donor, be suspended until the prize is 
paid. Motion seconded and carried. 

The Secretary: I beg to report that charges have 
been filed by Carrie E. Lamouree vs. Harry R. 
Kendall and by the Bulldog Club of America vs. 
Charles G. Hopton for misconduct in connection 
with dogs. 

Dr. DeMund: I move that that matter be referred 
to the Trial Board. Motion seconded and carried. 

The chair appointed as the New York Trial Board 
to hear and determine these charges Dr. DeMund, 
B. S. Smith and George Lauder, Jr. 

The Secretary: You heard my report about the 
trouble we are having in San Francisco, and I now 
submit to you Mr. Belmont's order of suspension. 
I would like to state that I sent that communication 
to the Pacific Advisory Committee, and it was re- 
turned to me with the statement that it would be 
conempt of court, as they were prohibited from tak- 
ing any action whatever owing to the temporary 
injunction restraining them. So 1 had to send it 
back to these people direct from this office. I received 
a telegram from William Ellery this morning stat- 
ing that the Pacific Advisory Committee had refused 
to give hour and place for contemplated hearing of 
injunction suit. The situation is this: There were 
nine different entries made in the catalogue of the 
San Francisco show, and when the official catalogue 
was sent to the Pacific Advisory Committee, and by 
it sent to this office, there were nine interlineations in 
handwriting giving in three or four instances differ- 
ences in date of birth of some of the puppies, and 
in other instances giving different names of sires. 

The Pacific Advisory Committee asked me what I 
thought about it. I said that the matter ought to be 
investigated. So they sent to the San Francisco Ken- 
nel Club asking it to send to them its entry forms. 
The San Francisco Kennel Club replied that the entry 
forms had been destroyed. This was in August, and 
the show was held in May. The destruction of the 
entry forms was quite probably brought about, as was 
explained to me, from the fact that they were in the 
custody of Mr. William Ellery, who was then up in 
Van Ness avenue, and who removed down to Geary 
street. He did not care about taking any of this stuff 
with him, and he destroyed it. The Pacific Advisory 
Committee then called upon the San Francisco Ken- 
nel Club to show cause why action should not be 
taken against them for changing the printed body of 
the catalogue, and they called upon Mr. Ellery, who 
is not only exhibitor, but the president and owner of 
the San Franciscoo Kennel Club, to produce his 
personal kennel records in their original form, giving 
both the club and Mr. Ellery fourteen days to comply 
with its request. I believe that it is a fact that the 
Pacific Advisory Committee did, through some over- 
sight, neglect to state the place where the meeting 
was to be held. There were two sources of redress. 
They should have submitted to the Pacific Advisory 
Committee, and if they lost their case there, to send 
it on to appeal here to the Executive Committee of 
the American Kennel Club, neither of which was 
done. 

It is clear that Mr. Ellery saw fit to ignore the 
American Kennel Club, both on the Coast and in New 
York, and applied to the courts and obtained a tem- 
porary injunction restraining our committee from any 
action whatever in the case, and an application is 
still pending for a permanent injunction. I am in- 
formed that the temporary injunction was granted on 
the ground that we were a foreign corporation doing 
business in another State without having filed our 
articles of incorporation. The action of these persons 
forced the American Kennel Club, through its Pacific 
Advisory Committee, to engage counsel, at some sub- 
stantial cost, and I sent a certified copy of our charter 
to the Coast, certified by the Secretary of State at 
Albany, and asked him if he found it necessary to 
file that charter to do so, pay the fees and send us 
the bill. I have a notice here that the counsel for the 
Pacific Advisory Committee says that in his opinion 
it is not necessary; that the American Kennel Club 
is a membership corporation, has no stock, does not 
carry on its business for gain, but it dooes carry it 
on for sociability and educational purposes, and for 
that reason he takes issue with them, and says that 
in his opinion it is not necessary to file it. 

Mr. Mortimer: I would like to say a few 
words in regard to this case, not because I am 
taking the part of the San Francisco Kennel 
Club, or Mr. Ellery, but simply because I know 
Mr. Ellery, and I have quite some knowledge of 



Saturday, January 15, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



the San Francisco Kennel Club, and I just wish 
to say a few words here to show that everything 
has not been carried on with the courtesy that it 
might have been. The San Francisco Kennel 
Club held its show on May 14, 1909, and its cata- 
logue was sent in to the Pacific Advisory Com- 
mittee, and it was passed by that body, and the 
winnings were published in the American Kennel 
Gazette on June 30, 1909. There was only one 
entry form sent on, and that was for fox terriers 
that were entered for June 19, 1909. After the win- 
wings had been published in the American Kennel 
Gazette — and I do not suppose there is any necessity 
for keeping the entry forms after the winners have 
been published — the entire list of entries was called 
for on August 6. They did not call for Mr. Ellery's 
forms alone, but for the entry forms of every dog 
that was entered in that show, which was over a 
month after the Kennel Gazette was printed and the 
awards published. Notification was sent to Mr. 
Ellery by the Pacific Advisory Committee that an 
affidavit had been filed on September 20, 1909. You 
note that the show was held on May 12 to 15, 1909, 
and this affidavit was made on September 20, the 
same date that the San Francisco Kennel Club was 
notified that it was to be tried for misconduct, but 
with no time or place mentioned for the proposed 
trial in this notification, no reply made by the Pacific 
Advisory Committee to a registered letter signed 
by Mr. Ellery asking for information as to the time 
and place when this trial was going to be held. This 
was addressed to J. P. Norman, secretary of the 
Pacific Advisory Committee. Mr. Ellery received the 
postoffice receipt for the delivery of the registered 
letter, but no reply was ever sent him or to the San 
Francisco Kennel Club to that registered letter ask- 
ing for the time and place where the trial was to 
be held, consequently they did not know when or 
where it was to be held, and then they took the ac- 
tion that you have heard about. That is all I have 
to say, but it seems there was a little irregularity. 
It seems to me if a committee has to retain all their 
original entry forms for an unstated length of time 
we would be obliged to have a special storeroom for 
that purpose. When once the awards have been 
passed by the representatives of the American Ken- 
nel Club, that is the Pacific Advisory Committee, one 
would imagine that those entries had been found cor- 
rect. Then all the entry forms were called for of 
every individual exhibitor at the show. At that time 
Ellery had to move from Van Ness avenue on account 
of the fire, and the building was being erected at 48 
Geary street. I was out there in May, and they 
showed me the new building which they were going 
to remove into the following month of June. All the 
waste paper and matter they did not want to take 
down to Geary street were destroyed. That is the 
reason those entry forms could not be produced, but 
Mr. Ellery makes the point that he could not receive 
any reply to a registered letter which he sent asking 
the Pacific Advisory Committee where this trial was 
going to take place, and when, and that is what he 
complains of. That is the reason he got out the 
injunction. 

The Secretary: He could have appealed to the 
American Kennel Club, at No. 1 Liberty street, and 
he would have gotten an answer. 

Dr. DeMund: I move that on the withdrawal of 
the injunction suit by Mr. Ellery and the San Fran- 
cisco Kennel Club, the payment of all expenses that 
the Pacific Advisory Committee has been put to in 
this case, and the submission of Mr. Ellery and the 
San Francisco Kennel Club to the jurisdiction of the 
Pacific Advisory Committee, that suspension be re- 
moved. Furthermore, that the Pacific Advisory Com- 
mittee be directed to appoint a place and time for the 
hearing of the charges against Mr. Ellery and the 
San Francisco Kennel Club. Motion seconded and 
carried. 

The secretary then read the following: In the 
matter of the Forth Worth Poultry and Pet Stock 
Association, H. W. Clapman was notified by this 
board to show cause why he should not be disquali- 
fied. The evidence submitted by H. W. Clapman 
being satisfactory, we find that there is no cause 
for his disqualification. J. E. DeMund, B. S. Smith, 
Franklin B. Lord, Jr., chairman. 

On motion said report was accepted and placed on 
file. 

The Secreteary: The Louisville Poultry and Pet 
Stock Association writes this letter and submits its 
catalogue. Here is the catalogue which is supposed 
to be typewritten. There are no awards in it at all. 
I told them I would submit it to this meeting to see 
whether you would accept that when our rules call 
for a printed catalogue. 

Mr. Mortimer: I move that it be returned to 
them and they be asked to insert their awards. Mo- 
tion seconded and carried. 

The Secretary: Here is an appeal from Charles 
Walters, which was brought before the executive 
committee. We can constitute ourselves a trial 
board and settle it right here, if you desire. At 
the Bridgeport show there was a collie entered by 
Mr. Walters. On the morning of the show this 
collie was very sick, and this gentleman sent his 
wife to the show and asked if the dog was well 
enough late in the afternoon they could bring it in. 
She asked the president of the club, who was also 
the chairman of the bench show committee, Dr. 
James E. Hair, and I have this letter to confirm his 
statement, he said they would admit the dog any 
time that afternoon, and he did it under this addi- 
tional rule 1. He was the chairman of the committee, 
and this lady supposed he had perfect authority under 
that rule to grant her that permission. They fixed 
the dog up so that they got it there about 6 o'clock 



that night. The dogs were judged the next day. She 
was awarded first. One of the competitors protested 
and the bench show committee, consisting of three, 
but not with the chairman of the committee present, 
sustained the protest, and they appealed from that 
decision. 

The Chairman: If you want to continue this case 
here now, you must constitute yourselves a trial 
board. 

Mr. Willets: I move that the matter be referred 
to a trial board. Motion seconded and carried. 

The Secretary: I now submit to you the matter 
of the application of the American Poultry Associa- 
tion asking for the co-operation of this club to take 
up with the express companies the question of rates, 
uniform dispatch in shipping, and so forth. We have 
been through this several times. 

Mr. Mortimer: The Poultry Association has suc- 
ceeded in getting a great many concession from the 
express companies, and I believe it would be a very 
good thing for some committee of the American Ken- 
nel Club to work in co-operation with them. 

Mr. Willets: I move that a committee of three 
be appointed to confer with the American Poultry 
Association, of which Mr. James Mortimer be one. 
Motion seconded and carried. 

The chair appointed as the other two members two 
members of the committee Messrs. R. P. Keasby and 
Mr. Chetwood Smith. 

o 

A. K. C. REGULAR QUARTERLY MEETING. 



Regular quarterly meeting of the American Ken- 
nel Club, held at its offices, No. 1 Liberty street, New 
York City, Tuesday, December 21, 1909, Vice-Presi- 
dent H. H. Hunnewell presiding. 

Present — Associate delegates, Dwight Moore, B. S. 
Smith and A. G. Hooley; Airedale Terrier Club of 
America, William B. Barclay; American Fox Terrier 
Club, H. H. Hunnewell; American Pomeranian Club, 
Theodore Offerman; American Spaniel Club, H. K. 
Bloodgood; Bloodhound Club of America, Dr. Louis 
G. Knox; Bulldog Club of America, E. L. Boger; Bull 
Terrier Breeders' Association, Cyril Crimmins; Cali- 
fornia Cocker Club, George H. Taylor; Cedarhurst 
Kennel Club, John G. Bates; Champion Kennel Club, 
Abram D. Gillette; Crotona Collie Club, George W. 
Cable; Dalmatian Club of America, Alfred B. Maclay; 
Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania, S. 
S. Leslie, Jr.. Great Dane Club of America, Dr. Edwin 
F. Gissler; Greyhound Club of America, M. Mow- 
bray Palmer; Long Island Kennel Club, John F. Col- 
lins; Maltese Terrier Club, Dr. E. H. Berendsohn; 
Mascoutah Kennel Club, C. F. R. Drake; New Eng- 
land Beagle Club, Chetwood Smith; Russian Walf- 
hound Club, Dr. J. E. DeMund; San Mateo Kennel 
Club, Howard Willets; Scottish Terrier Club of 
America, Robert Sedgwick, Jr.; Seattle Dog Fanciers' 
Association, Clarence Sackett; Southside Kennel 
Club, M. G. Kahn; the Ladies' Kennel Association 
of America, James Mortimer; Welsh Terrier Club of 
America, Franklin B. Lord, Jr.; West Highland 
White Terrier Club, George Lauder, Jr., Westchester 
Kennel Club, George Greer. 

The applications of the Butterfly Bench Show 
Association and the Southside Kennel Club having 
been approved by the Membership Committee, said 
clubs were duly elected. The following-named dele- 
gates were elected to represent the following named 
clubs. 

Bulldog Club of America, Edwin L. Boger; Bergen 
County Kennel Club, R. P. Keasby; Piping Rock 
Kennel Club, A. G. Hooley. Maltese Terrier Club, 
Edward H. Berendsohn; Monmouth County Kennel 
Club, Andrew Albright, Jr.;' Chicago Kennel Club, 
W. T. Fenton; Southside Kennel Club, M. G. Kahn, 
Pasadena Kennel Club, Freeman A. Ford. 

New York, Dec. 20, 1909. 
To the Delegates of the American Kennel Club. 

Gentlemen: — I beg to report that I have received 
two applications for active membership, eight cre- 
dentials, with the appointment of delegates, all of 
which I have referred to the Membership Committee, 
which will report at this meeting. 

I also report the nominations for delegates to rep- 
resent the associate subscribers made by the Mem- 
bership Committee on December 2, 1909, and from 
the same committee the names suggested to act as 
a Nominating Committee for the expiring class of 
directors. 

Dr. J. E. DeMund gives the following notice to 
amend the by-laws, article 6, new section 11: "Any 
directors who shall absent himself from two con- 
secutive regular meetings of the board, without being 
excused by a majority vote of said board, shall be 
deemed to have resigned, and shall cease to be a 
director." Respectfully submitted. 

A. P. VREDKNHURGH, Sec'y. 
New York, Dec. 20, 1909. 
To the American Kennel Club. 

Gentlemen: — I beg to present the financial state- 



ment from January 1, 1909, to date: 

Balance on hand January 1, 1909 $19,151.37 

Receipts from January 1 to date 23,472.09 



Total $42,623.46 

Disbursements from January 1 to date 25,718.64 



Balance on hand $16,904.82 

Respectfully submitted, 



A. P. VREDENHURGH, Treas. 

The Chairman: May I ask why it. is that the dis- 
bursements are in excess of the receipts? 

The Secretary: The expense of removal and the 
necessary new furniture made that increase of expen- 
ditures necessary, together with the additional rent. 
The expense of removal and the cost of new furniture 



was about $2,000, and the additional rent was about 
$1,000. That pays the rent up to the first of January. 
On motion, the treasurer's report was accepted and 
placed on file. The secretary ihen read the follow- 
ing report: 

December 2, . 1909. 
To the Delegates of the American Kennel Club. 

Dear Sirs: — In accordance with section 5, article 
10, of the by-laws, the Membership Committee at its 
meeting held December 2, 1909, suggests the follow- 
ing names to act as a Nominating Committee in con- 
formity with section 3, article 18, of the by-laws, 
namely: H. K. Bloodgood, Singleton Van Schaick, 
George Greer, B. S. Smith and Clarence Sackett. 

HOWARD WILLETS, 
Chairman Membership Committee. 

Mr. Moore: I place those names in nomination as 
members of the Nominating Committee for the ex- 
piring class of directors, and I move that the sec- 
retary cast one ballot for those names as read. Mo- 
tion seconded and carried and declared duly elected. 
A further report from the Membership Committee 
was as follows: 

December 2, 1909. 
To the Secretary of the American Kennel Club. 

Dear Sir: — In accordance with section 6, article 
10 of the by-laws, the Membership Committee at its 
meeting held December 2, 1909, nominated the fol- 
lowing persons as associate delegates to represent 
the associate subscribers for the year 1909, namely: 
W. G. Rockefeller, Dwight Moore, Ben. S. Smith and 
Winthrup Rutherford. 

HOWARD WILLETS, 
Chairman Membership Committee. 

The Secretary: Under the new by-laws we have 
had to reduce the number of our associate delegates 
from seven to four. That is the reason there were 
only four nominated. These nominations are to be 
voted for by the associates in January. I have this 
proposed amendment to the by-laws offered by Dr. 
DeMund, which I will read: 

"Art. VI, new Sec. XI. Any director who shall ab- 
sent himself from two consecutive regular meetings 
of the board without being excused by a majority 
vote of said board shall be deemed to have resigned 
and shall cease to be a director. 

"J. E. DeMUND." 

Dr. DeMund: I move that it be referred to the 
Rules Committee. I merely report it here in con- 
formity with the by-laws, which require it to be read 
to the meeting and published in the Gazette. Mo- 
tion seconded and carried. 

New York, Dec. 21, 1909. 

To the American Kennel Club: 

Gentlemen: — I beg leave to submit the following 
for your consideration: That a rule be provided for 
the registry of all litters whelped, giving date, sire 
and dam. That a charge sufficient to cover expense 
of publishing same be made. That no puppy be en- 
titled to enter any competition after January 1, 1911, 
where said rule has not been observed. That the 
number of puppies in litter and sex of them be made 
a part of the record. That no foreign-born puppies 
be admitted to competition in the puppy class. 

Respectfully submitted for the further considera- 
tion of the Committee on Rules. 

S. S. LESLIE, Jr., 
Delegate Duquesne Kennel Club. 

Dr. DeMund: I move that it be referred to the 
Committee on Rules. 

Mr. Gillette: May I suggest that there be included 
in that proposed rule the following: "That the 
American Kennel Club be notified of the deaths." 

Mr. Mortimer: I think that is a matter that ought 
. to be discussed here. It seems to me that there are a 
great many objections to it, and as we have a pretty 
full meeting of delegates here this question should 
be discussed by them now. To my mind it is one 
of the most absurd propositions that ever was brought 
before this club. It seems to me an erroneous idea 
that puppies can be identified from the mere fact 
that they are registered. If a man wants to he dis- 
honest in this regard he can be so regardless of how 
much registration might be resorted to. So far as 
shutting out puppies of foreign breed is concerned, 
I do not think it is right at all. I should like to hear 
some discussion on this subject. 

Mr. Leslie: As a delegate of I lie club which makes 
this recommendation, and as Mr. Mortimer seems to 
think it is absurd, I want to say that I think it is 
anything but absurd. To my mind, and I think to the 
minds of a great many people present, puppies are so 
near the limit or over the limit that there is very 
little question whether they are puppies at all. This 
proposed rule was framed to prevent fraud on the 
part of men who will do those things. The majority 
of breeders will not countenance it. Mr. Mortimer 
would not countenance it. It gives the Kennel Club 
some check on the puupies that are coming in. As 
to the matter of our preventing foreign-bred puppies 
from being exhibited in the puppy class, it is fin the 
benefit of the American-bred dog, and in order to try 
to bring it to a better standard than it is today. I 
trust that the Rules Committee will adopt it. 

Mr. Morimer: I want to say that I think it is 
impossible to make a man honest by legislation. I do 
not see how the registration of litters or puppies is 
going to be a safeguard at all, because it is the easiest 
thing In the world to substitute some other puppy. 
As I said before, if a man is dishonest hi; will con- 
tinue to be so; it does not make any difference what 
rules you make, and the fact that Mr. Leslie has seen 
some puppies which looked like grown dogs Is no 
reason why this rule should be adopted. A puppy is 
a puppy until he has attained the age of twelve 
months, although there are many breeds that develop 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 15, 1910. 



earlier. I do not think the shutting out of foreign- 
hred dogs will add to the interest or to the benefit of 
dogs in general. We have already shut out the 
foreign-bred dogs from the novice class, and the 
result is that whereas our novice class, before that 
rule was passed, was the largest class in the show, it 
is now the smallest class. Anybody who has had any 
experience in superintending shows will know that 
what I am saying is true. 

The Chairman: This matter must go before the 
Rules Committee, and anyone who wishes to make 
any suggestions may come before that committee and 
they will be beard. 

Mr. Lord: 1 think it must be referred to the 
Rules Committee by a vote. 

Mr. Leslie: I move that this suggestion be re- 
ferred to the Rules Committee. 

The Chairman: Do you accept the amendment that 
has been made in regard to the insertion of deaths? 

Mr. Leslie: Yes. 

The Chairman: Mr. Gillette, your amendment was 
that deaths should also be recorded? 
Mr. Gillette: Yes. 

The Chairman: The chairman of the Rules Com- 
mittee is not here today, but as one of the Rules 
Committee I should be glad to hear any other sug- 
gestion that anyone would care to make. I should 
also be very glad to have anybody who so desires to 
come before the Rules Committee or send anything 
they like in the form of suggestions to the committee 
in writing. A call for the ayes and naves on the 
motion resulted in the motion being lost. 

Dr. DeMund: I would like to offer an amend- 
ment to that last motion. I think the by-laws pre- 
scribe that any amendment to the rules may be 
offered, and must go to the Rules Committee, and 
then that committee reports back. I do not think this 
meeting has any power to take the matter out of the 
hands of the Rules Committee. The delegates can 
only act on the report of the Rules Committee. 

The Chairman: Your idea is that it goes to the 
Rules Committee from the mere fact that it has been 
reported here? 

The Secretary: I do not think there is any doubt 
about that, but at the annual meeting you can vote 
it down, if you please. 

Mr. Leslie: Just in the same manner that those 
other reports were referred to the Rules Committee 
without the action of this body. 

The Secretary: This is simply giving notice at this 
meeting that such an amendment is proposed. 

The Chairman: Mr. Mortimer called for an ex- 
pression of opinion on that proposed amendment 
to the rules, and that goes with the report to the 
committee. That being the case. I should like to call 
for the ayes and nays again. This matter has got 
to go to the Rules Committee. 

Mr. Mortimer: Isn't it sufficient, this meeting of 
delegates here, a larger meeting than is usually held, 
having expressed their opinion that this should not 
go to the Rules Committee? 

The Chairman: This matter must go to the Rules 
Committee under the constitution. 

Mr. Mortimer: I move that if that goes to the 
Rules Committee that the vote that was taken also 
goes to the Rules Committee. The chair then called 
for a vote on this motion by a showing of hands, 
which resulted in seven ayes and fourteen nays. 

The Secretary: At one of the meetings of the 
delegates in May last there was a sub-committee 
appointed to report upon a bill rendered by Davies, 
Stone and Auerbach for $1,000 for legal services. 

Mr. Willets: I beg to make a slight correction that 
the bill was originally $4,000. After various talks and 
negotiations with Mr. Auerbach the bill has been 
reduced to $1,000. The secretary then read the re- 
port of the sub-committee referred to. 

Dr. DeMund: I move that the report be accepted 
and placed on file. Motion seconded and carried. 

Mr. Mortimer offered the following amendment to 
the rules: "Amend rule 15 of the rules governing 
clubs by striking out the second paragraph of the rule 
and a new rule substituted in the original form. 

The Secretary: The object of this amendment is 
to give them the privilege of publishing the name of 
the owner first. 

Mr. Leslie: I move that the amendment be re- 
ferred to the Committee on Rules. 

Mr. Lord: I would like to hear an expression of 
opinion on that. 

Dr. DeMund: I do not see the object of an expres- 
sion of opinion beforehand. The Rules Committee 
cannot adopt a rule. The amendment must be sent 
back to the delegates, and then is the time to make 
suggestions before voting upon it. The Committee 
on Rues merely reports back to this body. 

The Chairman: They report back at the annual 
meeting. 

Mr. Mortimer: The annual meeting takes place in 
February. In the meantime the Westminster Kennel 
Club will be getting out its catalogue, and I ask the 
privilege of putting in the names of the owners 
first. It has been done in that manner for a great 
many years, and it has been done by every other club 
in the world. 

The Chairman: That cannot be done. 

Mr. Mortimer: I have sent communications to 
several of the representatives here, but I do not know 
what was done in the case. It seems rather a hard- 
ship when you are willing to conform to every rule 
which the American Kennel Club makes, and con- 
sidering the size of your catalogue, and the fact that 
you spend $1,600 or $1,700 for your catalogue, you 
cannot word it as you please. If anyone can show 
me any benefit accruing from this change I should be 
very glad to give way. 

The Chairman: The only thing that I can remem- 



ber as the object which the Rules Committee had 
in mind when they made this change was to make it 
clear that it was the dogs that were being exhibited 
and not the owners. 

Mr. Mortimer: I say with equal force now you give 
the pedigree of the owner instead of the dog. Now 
you first enter your dog's name and your stud book 
noumber, and then you enter the owner's name, and 
then the date of the birth and the sire and dam. It 
does not show that the date of birth and the sire and 
dam belong to the dog. It might naturally follow the 
owner's name. 

The Chairman: This will ge before the Rules Com- 
mittee. I am informed that there is nothing else to 
come before this meeting, and a motion to adjourn 
is in order. Meeting adjourned. 

o 

GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 

For the sportsman who fancies upland shooting 
over a good setter or pointer weather conditions have 
recently been good. There has been enough rain 
to beat down the cover in open ground. The cold 
spell sends the quail into heavy, close thickets for 
shelter at night, and they hold up in the cover until 
the sun is well up, when they come out to feed and 
get warm. 

Local sportsmen who have the good fortune to 
secure the privilege of visiting good quail grounds 
within easy reach of this city — and such territory is 
about as scarce these days as hen's teeth, have re- 
cently enjoyed excellent shooting, particularly so in 
some sections of Sonoma county. W. H. Metson 
recently indulged in a pleasing quail shoot on pri- 
vate grounds. 

Madera county hill sections were plentifully 
stocked with quail early in the season. Never in 
recent years had the birds been so numerous, both 
in the Coast Range and in the Sierra Nevada moun- 
tain country. In some sections of the foothills the 
country was fairly alive with quail. 

Down Salinas way, in territory that has hereto- 
fore been good shooting ground, recent reports state 
that results are disappointing. The birds are wild 
and hike for the hillside heavy coverts when the 
hunter gets within a hundred yards. 

A party of Salinas sportsmen — Will Jacks, C. He- 
bert, G. Parker, T. P. Joy, G. H. Gross and F. Feliz— 
recently shot over the Jacks rancho, on the Corral 
de Tierra, and found the birds few and elusive. 

Farther south, near Elkhorn slough, Empire Gun 
Club members are well pleased with quail-hunting 
sport on their preserve. J. B. Hauer, J. Peltier and 
others have garnered many limits since the season 
opened. 

A. M. Cummings spent several weeks near Los 
Alamos, San Luis Obispo county, in an excellent 
quail-hunting district. He had little trouble in get- 
ting both quail and English snipe limits. 

The members of the Salmon Creek Rod and Gun 
Club find quail hunting on their holding near Bodega 
bay an agreeable asset on the credit side of the 
sports afield ledger. Southern California sportsmen, 
particularly in San Bernardino county, find enough 
quail to make it worth while for a day's trip in the 
hills. 

In some sections of the State the heavy snows 
have played hob with the poor birds. At Independ- 
ence, Inyo county, several humane sportsmen have 
recently contributed a fund for the purchase of wheat 
to be fed to the thousands of quail that would have 
starved had they not been taken care of. The quail 
soon accustomed themselves to the new condition, 
and ffocked in daily to the feeding ground, tame 
as chickens in a barnyard. 

At Bishop other conditions prevailed, so it is re- 
ported, and many birds were shot one day recently. 
The snow covered the whole country. The birds 
were completely at the mercy of the gunners. 

Last Sunday quite a number of hunters returned 
with small strings of quail shot in the hills near 
Livermore. 

With the turn of the year there seems to have 
come a decided slump in possibilities for local duck 
hunters securing many limit bags of fat ducks. 
Weather conditions and the many overflowed feed- 
ing grounds and duck ponds have scattered the web- 
feet far and wide, particularly so the larger varieties. 

The canvasback and bluebille ducks have not de- 
serted the many nooks and corners of San Francisco 
bay and connecting waters. There birds shift around 
from one section to another as wind and weather 
decrees. One day flocks of many thousands will be 
observed gracefully riding the waters under the lee 
of the Key Route mole, the next day or within an 
hour, for that matter, a shift will be made to other 
quarters. 

One day last week thousands of canvasback and 
other ducks were observed in one large flock, esti- 
mated at a mile long, lying close inshore along the 
San Bruno section. Many ducks had crossed over 
into ponds and puddles west of the railroad tracks 
and were feeding and taking matters easy for the 
time being. 

One gun shot, however, and the whole convention 
adjourned for safer latitudes. The passage of the 
tra ; ns was apparently no cause for alarm, for the 
birds did not put off shore more than fifty yards as 
the trains came thundering by. Evidently they are 
capable of some discrimination. The bay frequenting 
ducks will soon work up a decidedly fishy flavor. 
The herring run, several weeks overdue, is now be- 
ginning and herring spawn is a ration that these 
birds do not pass tip. 



One of the best looking canvasback limits we have 
seen this season was shot by W. E. Meeks at Tubbs' 
island, Sonoma county, three other guns last Sun- 
day also accounted for limits. 

Frank Maskey took a midweek trip to his preserve 
near Teal station during the cold spell and had the 
unusual experience of trying to shoot ducks over a 
pond frozen an inch thick with ice. The ice was 
broken by a keeper and decoys put out. Inside of 
thirty minutes the wooden decoys were frozen in 
hard and fast. 

Jake Nickels had the same experience at the 
Cygnus Club ponds. At midday he was pleasantly 
surprised by a social visit of numerous sprig ducks. 

Imperial valley, according to L. M. Lidster, who 
just returned from an extended duck-shooting trip 
in that section, is an ideal for the quackers, but 
hardships for the hunter are encountered at every 
turn of the road. "The market shooters," said Mr. 
Lidster, "who inhabit this region and shoot to sup- 
ply Los Angeles cafes certainly earn their money." 
Notwithstanding the difficulties encountered the re- 
turned nimrod is very enthusiastic regarding the 
shooting and reports ducks plentiful. He brought 
back the limit in mallards, canvasback and teal. 
The small ducks, such as teal and widgeon, are the 
most plentiful in this section and the hunter has very 
little difficulty in bagging the limit of the little ones. 
Mr. Lidster expects to return to the Imperial valley 
in about a week, where he will spend the remaining 
days of the duck season. 

For four weeks past there has been a strong bear 
movement in the striped bass market, and bull salt- 
water fishing devotees have been very short on fish, 
but exceedingly long on expectation. For the time 
being the sport has closed with a "Garrison finish," 
since Bond landed the fifty-five-pounder. 

Last Sunday a corporal's guard of five Wingo 
anglers mustered at roll-call on an exceedingly chilly 
and cheerless morning. The tides seemed to be 
everything desired for good fishing, but the striped 
bass, if they were thereabout, ignored the allure- 
ments of clam-baited hooks. The sloughs were full 
of catfish. Possibly the bass preferred a change of 
diet. 

The same story may be told of the doings of the 
regulars and the Quo Vadis Club enthusiasts on the 
mud-banked San Antone slough. 

One night several weeks ago Frank Hittel and Al 
Wilson anchored their launch in San Antone slough. 
Making all snug, they turned in for the night. Hittell 
baited his hook and put the line overboard, letting 
the rod protrude through the hatch. He held the 
butt while he slept. Some time in the night a fish 
fastened on to the bait and ran away with the line. 
The noise of the reel awakened Hittell, who, half 
asleep, jumped out of his bunk and grabbed the rod. 
There was a heavy fish on and he had to play it. 

Getting out on the heavily frosted deck, 'wi'out the 
hose, wi'out the breeks," he stayed with his quarry 
until it was gaffed. It proved to be a twenty-eight 
pound striped bass. It is not often on a cold winter's 
night that a big fish is at one end and a shirt-tailed 
angler at the other of a fishing combination like that. 

Up to last Saturday and Sunday steelhead fishing 
in Russian river near Duncan's Mills was fairly 
good enough to tempt a large number of anglers to 
visit the resort. Early during the week but few- 
fish were taken, the run of big trout for the time 
being is believed to be over. 

A week previously the fair weather prevailing, al- 
though cold, made the large delegation of steelhead 
anglers at Duncan's Mills "merry as grigs." Thurs- 
day a few showers sprayed that section, but without 
changing the river conditions. Friday was a cloudy 
day with every indication of an early clearing. Cold 
it was and intensely so, but what care the brothers 
of the angle, the steelhead were running and they 
were of most generous size. 

Every day that week different devotees of the rod 
journeyed to Russian river, Saturday the main 
body departed for a try at the fish Sunday. Safe 
to say, that every enthusiast, locally and elsewhere, 
who could get away made the trip. 

The fishing has been better than for several sea- 
sons past. Some anglers use No. 3 or No. 4 Wilson 
spoons, others No. 4 double hooks on which is im- 
paled gobs of "trout bait," others again pin their 
faith on No. 4 red ibis flies tipped with a shrimp — all 
these lures have been effective. 

Several times that week Al Wilson sent to 
sporting goods stores in this city a catch of steelhead 
trout. These fish were all in fine condition, most 
of them fresh run, eight fish weighed, respectively, 
13, 10, 8, 8, 7, 9, 8, 7 and 8 pounds, and all these 
big trout put up a battle royal before turning silver 
side up. 

Two weeks ago Sunday seventeen large fish were 
taken ranging from i% to 12 pounds each, although 
the river then was slightly muddy. During the week 
many boats have averaged four to six fish a day. 

The heavy southeast storm during the week will 
probably put a quietus on the river until the season 
closes. 

But few fish were caught at Point Reyes last Sun- 
day. At the Salmon creek lagoon 15 trout caught 
by Jack Lemmer, Ned Bosqui and J. B. Coleman 
weighed 150 pounds. The fish were fresh run and in 
splendid condition. 

Steelhead are reported to be in the San Mateo 
lagoons — the San Gregorio, Pescadero and Buteno. 

The season for black bass closed on the 1st inst. 
o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, January 15, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



1! 



THE FARM 



Denmark produces the finest bacon 
on earth and the feeders over there 
depend upon barley as their chief 
feed such as we could do right here 
in California if we only took the no- 
tion. The grain is well cooked and 
led with roots and an occasional ra- 
tion of uncooked barley is given to 
sharpen the appetite. The hogs are 
given plenty of room to range and ex- 
ercise and no attempt is made to fat- 
ten them. On the contrary, the effort 
is made to increase the weight by feed- 
ing for development of those parts of 
the animal which are made into bacon 
and they claim from experience that 
barley is the very best thing for this 
purpose. In this country after a pig 
reaches seventy-five or a hundred 
pounds almost anything is given it in 
the way of feed. Some of our pack- 
ers have been advocating keeping hogs 
until they are eight to ten months in 
order to produce firm bacon, but if 
fed right a pig may be put on the 



THE BEST LINIMENT 

OR PAIN KILLER FOR THE HUMAN BODY 

^ Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 

IT HAS NO EQUAL 



Cam — It is penetrat- 
rUl iDg, soothing and 
healing, and for all Old 
1 L . Sores, Bruises, or 
IIIO Wounds, Felons 
Exterior Cancers, Boils 
Corns ai 
Bu n i o ns 
CAUSTIC BALSAM has 

Rnrlv no 'i"* 1 » s 
DUUT a Liniment 



We would say to all 
who buy it that it does 
not contain a particle 
of poisonous substance 
and therefore no harm 
can result from its ex- 
ternal use. Persistent, 
thorough use will cure 
many old or chronic 
ailments and it can be 
used on any case that 
requires an outward 
application with 
perfect safety. 



Perfectly Sale 
and 

Reliable Remedy 
for 

Sore Throat 
Chest Cold 
Backache 
Neuralgia 
Sprains 
Strains 
Lumbago 
Diphtheria 
Sore Lungs 
Rheumatism 
and 
all Stiff Joints 



REMOVES THE SORENESS -STRENGTHENS MUSCLES 
CorahiU. Tel.— "One bottle Caustic Balsam did 

my rheumatism more good than $1'J0.00 paid in 
doctor s bills." OTTO A. BEYER. 

Price S 1 .BO per bottle. Sold by druggists, or sent 
by us express prepaid. Write for Booklet R. 

The LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS COMPANY. Cleveland. 0. 




market at six months old. In many 
instances the value of roots has been 
underestimated but they certainly 
help to keep hogs in good condition 
and prevent them from becoming too 
fat when young. Without roots or 
alfalfa it is difficult for them to grow 
rapidly without becoming fat. Fed on 
something bulky, they will g. - ow and 
at the same time not become very fat. 



At 

Auction 

Sale 

JANUARY 18, '10 

at 1:00 p. m. and 7:30 p. m. 

No Outside Horses Taken. 

3 Carloads of 
Mares and Geldings 

1000 to 1400 lbs., 4 to 6 years of age, 
from the Brown Ranch, Wagon Tire 
Mountain, Oregon; these are recognized 
as the finest brand of horses on the 
Coast and all broke to work. 

Consigned by Henry Ecu. 

3 Carloads of Heavy 
Draft Mares and Geldings 

4 to 8 years of age, 1400 to 1700 lbs., 
from the J. Frank Adams Ranch, Ore. 
This is the first lot of draft horses ever 
shipped from Klamath Co. — All gentle. 

40 head will be offered 
at private sale. . . . 

Horses will be on exhibition Friday, Jan. 14 

Some handsome matched dapple grey 
teams. 

A very handsome outfit consisting of 
Carriage, Harness, Team and 2 Vic- 
torias, belonging to private parties. 

WESTERN HORSE MARKET, 

E. STEWART & CO., 297 st - 



Here is an Opportunity to Buy the Standard Trotting Stallion 



FAIR H I L LS 



REGISTERED NO. 42617 



and a splendid collection of choice trotting stock at a very low price. 

FAIRHILLS 42«17 was foaled in 19°3 at the Palo Alto Stock Farm. He is a 
bright bay in color, stands 15.3 hands and weighs 1180 pounds. He is as hand- 
some as a picture and has the individuality and muscularity that made his sire 
so famous. He is very gentle and thoroughly broke. When a three-year-old 
he was given to John Phippen, who, in seven weeks, drove him some fast quarters. 
Distemper broke out among the horses at the old San Jose track, so Fairhills 
suffering from a slight attack, was sent to Hopland. The calamity of April 18th 
following it was not deemed advisable to place him again in training. Mr. Plnp- 
cen claims he is one of the purest-gaited, most level-headed trotters he ever 
rirrwp The breeding of this horse should commend him to horsemen. As a foal- 
eetter he is absolutely sure, and all the colts and fillies by him are bays in 

Lr.fi natural trotters; they know no other gait, 
color and natura^ tiotte ,J endooiI ,„ 2! i»./ 2 (sire of Monte Carlo 2:07%, Men- 

,,niit« 2 07 'i IdoTita 2:09%, Claro 2:11%, Leonora 2:12%, Polka Dot 2:14%, and 
«°iih»rl in 2-30 i son of Electioneer 125 and Mano (dam of 2 and 2 sires of 16) 
hv Piedmont 2 17; second dam Mamie (dam of 2) by Hambletonian, Jr.; third 
SL piMa bv Mango, and on to the 14th dam, Old Montague Mare. 

FA HHILLS wis out of M.«ry O-borne <li) 2.28% (dam Of Dorothea A 2:29% 
and thV dam of May Worthy 2:29%), by Azmoor 2:20% (sire of Moortrix 2:07%, 



Rpionica 2 09 '// Bob 2:15 and the dams of Kowellan 2:09%, Arzilla 2:12%, etc.) 
hv Flfdion -i out of Mamie C. (dam of 3 in 2:30 and the dam of Aldeana 2:25) 
bv imported Hercules; second dam by Langford. son of Williamson s Belmont, etc 

The second dam of Fairhills was Elstle, the greatest speed-producing duuKhtci 
of r/en Benton. She was the dam of Kio Alto 2:16% (a sire), Novelist 2:27 (a 
■Ire? Pallta (2) 2:16 (dam of 2 and of Palite, sire of Pal, the unbeaten two-year- 
old of 1909 with a record of 2:17%), Mary Oshorn (2) 2:28%, and Salvlna 2:30. 

The third dam was Klnlne 2:20 (.lam of Iran Alto 2:12%, a sire, I ' ; 1 1 ; 1 1 1 1 1 . • 
2:18, Altoaine 2:29% and Anselma 2:29%) by Messenger Duroc (sire of 23 in the 
2 '30' list) 

The fourth dam was Green Mountain Maid (dam of Electioneer and 9 in the 
2:30 list) by Harry Clay 45, etc. 

Every dam in Fairhills' pedigree to the fourth generation is either a 2:30 per- 
former or a great broodmare. As an outcross for Wilkes, Nutwood and Director 
mares this strongly bred Electioneer stallion should produce horses perfect In 
gait, color and disposition, that will have early and extreme speed. He has every- 
thing in his favor, and should be given a record well below 2:20 this year. The 
only reason for selling is retiring from the business of breeding trotters, and will 
sell at extremely low prices, considering their breeding, soundness and Individual- 
ity, every head, including some choicely bred mares by McKlnney, Mendocino 
2:19%, Searchlight 2:03% and Monterey 2:09%, and all the colts and fillies by 
Kinney Lou 2:07%, Mendocino 2:19% and Fairhills. Most of them are eligible for 
registration; all the mares but two being registered. 

This is a grand chance for some one to get a bargain. For further particulars 



and catalogue, address 



HOPLAND STOCK FARM, 
1 1 .. ... I. Mendocino County, Oil., 
or 1210 Flood lliil Idlnc San FrunclHoo. Oil. 



The Third Annual Pleasanton Sale 



-OF 



STANDARD-BRED 



Trotters and Pacers 



WHICH TAKES PLACE DURING 

THE FIRST WEEK IN MARCH, 1910, 

includes many from such well-known lior.se breeders as C. L. Crellin, Pleasanton, 
Henry Struve, Watsonville, J. E. Montgomery, Davis, V. A. Hell wig, Aivarado, J. 
C. Armstrong, A. Goulart, Santa Rita, A. Edstrom, Oakland, II. Busing, Pleasan- 
ton, S. B. Van Dervort, Irvington, and many more are making entries. 

It promises to be a big sale. Send for entry blanks at once. 

Remember, all entries will close February 10th. No later! 

If you have a good one and want to sell for the highest price re- 
member this is your best opportunity ! 

GOOD HORSES BRING BIG PRICES AT PLEASANTON. 

FRED H. CHASE & CO., Auctioneers, 

478 Valencia St., San Francisco. 



McKinney Speed 2:02. 



TWO GOOD ONES. 



Demonio Spaed 2:03 



Gen. J. B. Frisbie 41637 

Handsome son of McKinney 2:11%, greatest sire of the age (22 with records from 
2:02 to 2:10); dam the great broodmare Daisy S. (dam of Tom Smith 2:13%, sire 
of Katalina 2:11%, General Vallejo 2:22%, Little Mac (3) 2:27, Sweet Rosie 2:28%, 
Vallejo Girl 2:10>/i. and Prof. Heald 2:23) by McDonald Chief 3583, son of Clark 
Chief 89; second dam Fanny Rose, great broodmare (dam of Geo. Washington 
2:16%, Columbus S. 2:17), by Ethan Allen Jr. 2993. General J. B. Frisbie is hand- 
some, good-gaited, black, nine years old. He is a full brother to Tom Smith 2:13'/1. 
FEE: $25 for the Season. Usual return privilege or money refunded. 



Demonio 28016 



Race Record 2:11 ; 



DEMONIO 2:11% is the sire of Mona Wilkes 2:03%, Memonio 2:09%, Demonio 
Wilkes 2:09%, Miss Winn 2:12%, Normono (2) 2:14%, and grandsire of Solano 
Boy 2:07%. He is one of the best sons of that great sire Charles Derby 2:20, 
which has 8 in the 2:10 list and whose sons rank high among the greatest pro- 
ducers of speed in the world. Demonio's dam is the great broodmare Bertha 
(dam of Don Derby 2:04%, Owyho 2:07%, Derbertha 2:07%, Diablt 2:09%, and f> 
others in 2:30 list) by Alcantara 729, next dam Barcina by Bayard 53, next dam 
Blandina by Hambletonian 10. 

FEE FOR THE SEASON $40. For a limited number of approved outside mares. 

Usual return privilege. Excellent pasturage at $3 per month. Good care 
taken of mares, but no responsibility assumed. For further information address 

RUSH & RAILE, Sulsun, Cal. 



Jim Logan 



Reg. No. 44997. 




J. E. MONTGOMERY, 



Champion 3-year-old Pacer of the World. 
Record 2:05'^ in third heat. 

Sired by Chas. Derby 4907 (sire of 9 in 2:10 list; sons sired Sir 
Alberts. 2:0:%. Sir John S. 2:04%, Mona Wilkes 2:08%, etc.. etc.); 
dam Etlie Logan (dam of Sir Albert S. 'l:0:i%, Jim Logan (3) 
2:05%, Dan Logan (Mat.) 2:12%) by Durfee 1 1 J. r >0 (sire of Shecan 
2:12>2. etc.) ; second dam Ripple by Prompter; third dan Grace 
by Buccaneer. 

Jim Logan stands lf> hands 1 inch. He is sound and a splen- 
did individual. Hood disposition and unexcelled breeding. 

Season of 1910 at 

PLEASANTON, Cal. 

( Limited number of mares.) 

FEE: $50 for the Season 

$10 returned if mare fails to get in foal. Money due w hen mare is 
served. Good pasturage at $■'> per month. Hest of care taken of 
mares, but no responsibility assumed. 

Ship mares via Southern Pacific or Western Pacific. 

- Pleasanton, Cal. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 

(Typewritten, Suitable for Framing. 

Stallion Folders 

witli picture of the horse and terms on first page; complete 
tabulated pedigree on the two inside pages and description on 
back page. 

Stallion Cards 

Two sides, size \\% x 6>£, to fit exvelope. 

Stallion Cards for Posting 

Size, one-half sheet, 14 x 22; size, one-third sheet, II x 14. 



STALLION SERVICE BOOKS, $1. 

It Pays to Advertise Your Horse! 

Address, BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

366 Pacific B I dg. , San Francisco 



ADVERTISE IN THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January ir>, 1910. 



THE AMERICAN MILCH GOAT. 



For six years I have been interested 
in the milch goat industry in the 
United States, and have always pre- 
dicted that in time, and not a very long 
time either, we of the large cities ot 
the United States must depend on 
the goat for a large part of our milk 
supply. The milk famine of today 
is not for the reason that the sup- 
ply is smaller than a few years ago, 
but on account of the increased con- 
sumption of dairy produce. People in 
our large cities have taken up the 
habit of drinking milk in the last few 
years who hardly knew the taste of 
it five years ago. It is a standing 
joke that a goat can be kept on tomato 
cans, cobblestones, and such dainty 
kinds of food, but that is all paper 
talk. A goat to produce a good sup- 
ply of pure miik needs the same care 
we give a good dairy cow, and above 
all things, a good dry place to sleep, 
and their hay should be kept in a 
rack so they will have to climb for it, 
as it is their nature to reach up for 
their food. If your pasture has no big 
rock for them to sleep on, a few good- 
sized wooden boxes set around in the 
pasture will be used by the goats for 
a place to take their nap. The main 
reason why the goat industry will 
grow is the large number that can be 
wintered on so small amount of feed. 
From my experience I think it is safe 
to figure that six goats can be kept 
on the same food through the winter 
as one dairy cow, and a herd can be 
arranged so that half- are fresh all the 
time, as they can be fresh twice a 
year, and then give them plenty of 
time dry. 

The average goat gives about two 
and a half quarts per day, so the six 
would give 15 quarts. The wholesale 
price in cities where it is sold is 20 
cents and the retail 25 cents. You 
can plainly see that it is a profitable 
industry. Have you a cow that is re- 
turning $3 per day? There are a few 
full-blood Toggenburg goats in this 
country, and they have been bred for 
the milk standard so they give as 
high as four quarts per day, and I 
have heard of one that gave five 
quarts per day at three milkings, but 
two and a half is a safe figure to 
count on. Another point well worth 
considering is that a goat is rarely 
ever sick, and I believe immune from 
tuberculosis. If you wish to reduce 
your herd you will have to kill them 
off, for it will never pay to wait for 
them to die; you might not live long 
enough. 

Goats' milk is recommended by all 
the best doctors for babies and sick 
people. Wherever it can be obtained 
ask your family doctor what he thinks 
of it. I bought a native doe for the 
milk for my little girl after she had 
a bad case of pneumonia, and she did 
so well and got better so much faster 
than on cows' milk that it awakened 
my interest in the goat. I crossed my 
native doe with a full-blooded buck, 
and at that kidding she gave about 
two and a half quarts per day. As 
luck would have it, the kids were 
bucks. The next time I had better 
luck, and only got one kid, but that 
was a doe. They almost always have 
two kids at a time, and sometimes as 
many as four, but that is rare. 

I bred the kid when she was nine 
months old to the same buck; a thing 
I do not approve is inbreeding, but 
in this case there seemed to be no 
other way. When she dropped her 
kids she gave a very little more than 
the native goat, but not what I hoped 
for. Don't laugh at the goat industry 
until you look carefully into it and 
find the joke. I am a traveling man 
and have had a chance to study dif- 
ferent herds and see what others are 
doing, and have compared them with 
my own little experience, and expect 
some day in the near future to get in 
the business to stay. — C. H. Williams, 
in the Rural New Yorker. 




Registered Trade Mark ™ 

SPAVIN CURE 




Results Like this and Absolute 
Protection are Invincible Argu- 
ments in Favor of "Save-the- 
Horse." 

FREE PORT, L. I., Nov. 29, 1909. 

Troy Chemical Co., Blnghamton, N. Y.: 

Gentlemen: Enclosed find check for 
one more bottle of "Save-the-Horse" 
Spavin Cure. 

Every horseman around here thought 
the horse was Incurable, but they don't 
think so now. 

Here is what I've done with "Save- 
the-Horse," and some of these cases 
were cured two and three years ago, 
as you know, and are cured to-day. In 
fact, am not afraid to undertake any 
case for which "Save-the-Horse" Is in- 
dicated without the guarantee. 

The first case was a gray mare with 
bone spavin over three years' standing. 
She was so lame everyone thought she 
would never go sound again. In six 
weeks' time (using only one bottle of 
"Save-the-Horse") she did not take a 
lame step. Let her out to the Freeport 
Golf Club and worked every weekday. 

The next case was a fine blooded 
horse witli ringbone, belonging to a 
friend of mine. This took about one 
and a half bottles of "Save-the-Horse." 
In two months' time he did not take a 
lame step. 

Also cured a polo pony who was 
hardly able to get out of the stable; 
both hind legs affected with the worst 
bone spavin I ever saw. Bought him 
for $10, and everyone said I would 
have to saw off his legs and have new 
ones made. The whole hock was af- 
fected. He had been fired and blistered 
three times. I used "Save-the-Horse," 
and in ten weeks' time you would not 
know that he had ever been spavined 
except for the marks of the firing iron. 

Have also cured a fine saddle horse 
of thoroughpin with "Save-the-Horse," 
also several cases of windpuff. 

Will be glad to answer anyone writ- 
ing to me regarding these cases. Yours 
truly, CARL DARENBERG. 

$5 A BOTTLE, 
with signed guarantee. 

This is a binding contract, and pro- 
tects purchaser absolutely in treating 
and curing any case of BONE and 
BOG SPAVIN, THOROUGHPIN, RING- 
BONE (except Low). CURB, SPLINT, 
CAPPED HOCK, WINDPUFF, SHOE- 
BOIL. INJURED TENDONS, and all 
LAMENESS. No scar or loss of hair. 
Horse works as usual. 

Send for copy of this contract, book- 
let on all lameness and letters from 
prominent business men, bankers, 
farmers and horse owners the world 
over on every kind of case. 

At all druggists and dealers, or ex- 
press paid. 

THOV CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
Itinghninton, \. Y. 
D. E. Newell. 
SIS Dayo Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 
1 IOS Market Street, San Franclaoo, Cal. 



MARDI GRAS EXCURSION 



Personally conducted to the great festival 
city, New Orleans, leaves San Francisco 

JANUARY 29, '10. 

ROUND TRIP $67.50 

Tickets good for thirty days' trip, via the 
famous ocean to gulf line. 

SUNSET ROUTE 

One hundred mile ride along the ocean 
shores of the Pacific. Through Southern 
California orange groves, the rice, cotton 
ami sugar fields of Texas and Louisiana. 
Picturesque bayous, the Teche, Land of 
Evangeline. 

Oil burning locomotives. 

No soot. No cinders. 
Through drawing-room sleepers, berths, 
sections, drawing-rooms, dining, parlor 
and observation car service. Steam 
heated and electric lighted throughout. 
Ten days' stopover at New Orleans on 
all first-class tickets reading to points 
East. 

Through tourist car service to New Or- 
leans, Washington, Cincinnati, St. Louis 
and Chicago. 

Write for our beautifully illustrated 
booklet, "Winter in New Orleans." 
Tells in detail of the attractions of the 
Crescent City and the wonders of the 
Mardi tiras. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Ticket Offices— Flood Building. Market St. Ferry 
Depot, Third and Townsend SU.. Depot. Broad- 
way and Thirteenth St., Oakland. 



FOR SALE OH LEASE. 

KINNEY H., three-year-old stallion 
by Kinney Rose 2:13%, a son of Mc- 
Kinney 2:11)1; dam Leta H. by Nut- 
wood Wilkes. Kinney H. is a splendid 
young horse in every respect, hand- 
some, intelligent, good disposition and 
very promising. With his breeding and 
individuality, he is one of the most 
desirable grandsons of McKinney in 
this part of the State. 

For further particulars, call or ad- 
dress CHRIS HASHAGE.N", 

2S01 2i»t St., San Franclaco. 

FOR SALE OR TRADE. 

A very handsome bay mare, 16 hands 
seven years old, sired by Moses S.; first 
dam mare by Hawthorne. She has won- 
derful stamina and has trotted quarters 
in 33 seconds, although never trained or 
given a record. She is a fine road mare, 
with perfect action. 

Price $300, or will trade for a sorrel 
16.2, not over seven years old, that will 
make a four-horse leader. 

Apply for two weeks at Perry's Sta- 
ble*, \apa, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

Josephine, one of the greatest race 
mares in the West. Record 2:07% and 
5 years old. Started in 40 races, win- 
ning first money 18 times, out of money 
only 4 times. She is sound and without 
a blemish. 

Her dam, Lady May, is also for sale; 
is in foal by Zolock, due Feb. 12, 1910. 
Lady May is one of the greatest brood 
mares in California and for family ani- 
mal cannot be excelled. 

Will sell one or both very cheap. 

Address 

W. T. Rl SSELL. Highland, Cal. 
FOR SALE. 

Andy Carnegie 2:161,4 by Jersey 
Wilkes, by George Wilkes, first dam 
Daisy F. by Commander, the dam of 2 
in the 2:20 list. He Is a handsome and 
stylish bay gelding, sixteen hands high; 
weighs 1150 pounds; perfectly sound; 
drives single or double; good under 
saddle, and can step in 2:12. He is a 
fine prospect. This horse had been do- 
ing heavy work on a ranch until last 
year; since that time, with compara- 
tively little training, he won the only 
race in which he was entered in three 
straight heats. For further informa- 
tion, write G. W. BONNELL, Redlands, 
Cal. 



CHESTNUT TOM 434KS FOR SALE. 

I want to sell my stallion Chestnut 
Tom 2:15, as I am now engaged in busi- 
ness and cannot give him my attention. 
He is by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, sire of 
John A. McKerron 2:04%, the fastest 
trotting stallion in America, and of 
Copa de Oro 2:01V4, the fastest pacing 
heat winner of 1909. His dam, Zeta 
Carter, is by Director 2:17, and his 
grandam Lida W. 2:18% is by Nut- 
wood 2:18%, and is the dam of four In 
the list. Chestnut Tom is the sire of 
Louise Carter, three-year-old record 
2:24, the only one of his get ever 
trained. Chestnut Tom was foaled in 
1898, is a very strong and vigorous 
horse, and will be a sure sire of speed 
if given an opportunity. 

For price and further particulars, ad- 
dress GEO. T. ALGEO, 
3804 Piedmont Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 

FOR 5 A LB. 

Chestnut gelding, foaled 1905. by 
Monterey 2:09 14, dam Theresa 2:14 by 
Silver Bow, second dam Laura Wilkes 
2:17 by Guy Wilkes 2:15%, third dam 
by Steinway 2:25. Stands 15.2% hands 
high and weighs 1100 pounds.. Power- 
fully built, always in good flesh, a nat- 
ural born pacer, perfectly gaited, wears 
light shoes, no straps or boots of any 
kind, and with only 7 months' training 
in all, on the 24th day of last August 
paced a mile in 2:08 fiat, last half in 
1:02, last quarter in 29 seconds. The 
performances of this horse have been 
kept under cover and nobody knows his 
speed. If he is not a two-minute 
pacer, there never was one, and my 
only reason for selling is that I need 
the money. This horse is guaranteed 
sound, good-headed and game. 

Also, a beautiful blooded bay car- 
riage gelding, 5 years old, 16 hands 
high, weighs 1150 pounds, standard 
bred. Can trot a 2:30 gait. Handsome, 
guaranteed sound and safe for a lady 
to drive among cars and automobiles. 

Apply to or address H. HANSEN, 
1420 4tlth Ave., MelroMe. Cal. 

FOR SALE 

Nearest 2:22! 

Sire of 

Highfly 2:04,, Alone 2:09*4, 
Trueheart 2:19 1 ,,, Joe Gans 2:19'.., 
Just It (3-year-old) 2:19' ,., 

and brother to John A. McKerron 2M X A, second 
fastest stallion in the world. 

Nearest is lf> 3 A hands high, weight 1200 pounds. 
This horse is a sure foal getter and is in splendid 
condition. 

Address. MRS. S. V. BAKSTOW. 

1042 Alameda Ave.. San Jose. Cal. 

RUBEROID ROOFING. 

Weather Proof. Acid Proof. Fire Resisting. 
BONESTELL A CO. 
118 to 124 First St., San Franeiaco. Cal. 



Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. Complicated cases treated suc- 
cessfully. Calls from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

The best work at reasonaoie prices 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL. 

• 20 Ootavla St., between Fulton and Orove. 
Phone 8peclal 2074. San Franeiaco, Cal. 

GLIDE BROTHERS 

Successors to J. H. (ilide & Sons. 
Sole Proprietors of the 
FAMOUS BLACOW- ROBERTS-GLIDE 
FRENCH MERINO SHEEP. 

Glide Grade — 7-8 French and 1-H Spanish Merino 
—Thoroughbred Shropshire Rams- 
Rams for sale at all times. 
P. O. Box 215. Telephone and telegraph. 
Dixon, Cal. Addres9. Dixon, Cal. 



PEDIGREED FOX HOUNDS. 

All guaranteed, broke dogs and puds. 400 red 
fox cubs. Price list. 

J. D. STODGHILL. ShelDrvllle Ky. 



GOOD FISHING 

and pleasure boating on the Mann snore at 

Tiburon and vicinity. Fishing TacKle to let and 
liait always on hand. First-class buata at reas- 
onable prices. 

San Francisco Boat House, 

Capt. F. Wm. Ehrke. Prop.. Tiburon. Cal. 
Good ferry service from foot of Market St.. 



Blake, Moffit & Towne 

Dealers in PAPER 

1400-1450 4th St., San Franeiaco. Cal. 

Blake, Moffit a Towne. Los Angelas. 
Blake. McFall & Co., Portland. Ore. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY, 

High-Class Art iu 
HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 
Artiatic Designing 
141 Valencia St., San Francisco 




THREE IN ONE OIL, CO., 
102 New St., New York City. 



SEND 
FOR 



Our New 
CATALOG 

Beautifully Illustrated - FREE 



C. C. MORSE & CO. 

Seeds - Plants - Trees 
57 Jackson St. San Francisco 




BINE 



Cures Strained Puffy Ankles, Lymphangitis, 
Poll Evil, I istula. Sores. Wire Cuts, Bruis- 
es and Swellings. Lameness, and Allays 
Pain Quickly without Blistering, removing 
the hair, or laying the horse up. Pleusant 
to use. $2.00 per bottle ci dealers or de- 
livered. Horse Book 5 1> free. 
ABSORBING, JR., (manklnd.f1.00 bo* 
1 tle.)For Strains, Qout,VuricoseVeina,Var- 
— " Icoeele.Hydrocele, Prostatitis, kills psla. 
YOUNG, P. D. F., 54 Temple St., Springfield, Mass. 
For 8ale by— Langley & Michaels, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal.; Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore.: F. w. Braun Co., Los Angeles, Cal.; 
Western Whosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal. ; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cal. ; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 



Saturday, January 15, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



California Breeders Association 

Canfield - Clark Stakes No. 1 

To be raced under the auspices of the California Breeders Association 
for foals of 1908 to be raced as 2-year-olds in 1910. 

Entries to close February 1, *10. 

$ 1 000 Guaranteed Purse for Trotters 

ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS. 

Feb. 1, MO, $10; June 1, '10, $15; final payment, $25, ten days before the 
meeting begins at which the race is to be trotted. Nothing additional from 
money winners. 



CONDITIONS. 



Mile heats, 2 in 3. Distance, 150 yards. Entry must be accompanied by 
entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment 
forfeits all previous payments. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these stakes in case the number of 
entries received is not satisfactory. 

Money divided 50. 25, 15 and 10 per cent. 

Write for entry blanks and further information to 



C. A. CAXFIELD, President. 



WE L. JAMES, Secretary, 
317 West 17th St., I <>x Angeles, Cal. 




Zolock 2:05J 2£ 



Terms: 
$50. 



McKinney's Fastest Entire Son 



Sire of 

Sherlock Holmes2:06 R. Ambush - 2 :00]4 

Delilah 2:0654 Velox - - 2:09% 

Bystander - - 2:07!* Boton de Oro 2:10% 
Josephine - - 2:07% Me O. D. - - 2:11% 
etc., etc, 

By McKinney 2:llK. dam. the great brood 
mare, Gazelle 2:\\%. 

Will make a short season, Dec. 1st to April 1st, at 

SAN JOSE DRIVING PARK, SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Monterey Road. 

Address. N. S. YOUNG, San Jose 



ZOMBRO 2:11, 



The Great Sire of Trotters, 



Will be in the stud at 



Los Angeles until April 1, 1910 



TERMS: $100 to insure. Money refunded if mare proves not in foal. 

ZOMBRO has 14 new standard performers for 1909, 12 new ones In 2:20, 7 in 
2:15 and 2 in 2:10. Ten of his get reduced their records in 1909. He now has 59 
standard performers, of which 39 have records of 2:20 or better, 22 have records 
of 2:15 or better, and 9 have records of 2:10 or better. No other horse living ever 
made such a showing except Zombro's sire, McKinney. Get a Zombro while you 
have the opportunity. Address GEO. T. BECKERS, 

3727 South Figueroa St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



$10 Due on Two-Year-Olds 

Tuesday, Feb. 1, '10. 

$7,250— Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 8 

PACIFIC COAST TROTTING HORSE BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 

Foals Born 1908 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 
ENTRIES CLOSED DECEMBER 2, 1907. 

$4,250 for Trotting Foals. $1750 for Pacing Foals. $800 to Nominators 
of Dams of Winners and $450 to Owners of Stallions. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



$3000 for Three- Year-Old Trottera. 
200 for Nominator on whoae entry la 
named the Dam of Winner of 
Three-Yenr-OId Trot, 
for Two- Year-Old Trotter*, 
for Nominator on whoae entry la 
named the Dam of Winner of 
Two-Year-Old Trot. 
100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of 
Winner of Three- Year-Old Trot 
when mare was bred. 



1250 
200 



IOOO for Three- Year-Old Pacera. 
200 for Nominator on whoae entry la 

named the Dam of Winner of 

Three-Yenr-OId Pace. 
750 for Two-Yenr-Old Pacera. 
200 for Nominator on whoae entry la 

named the Dam of Winner of 

Two-Yenr-Old Pace. 
100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of 

Winner of Three-Y>nr-Old Pace 

when more waa bred. 



$250 in Special Prizes was Paid to Stallion Owners. 

$10 on Two- Year-Olds February 1. 1010; $10 on Three- Year Olds February 1. 1911. 

STARTING PAYMENTS — $25 to start In the Two-Year-Old Pace; $35 to start In 
the Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start In the Three-Year-Old Pace; $50 to 
start in the Three-Year-Old Trot. All Starting Payments to be made ten days 
before the first day of the meeting at which the race Is to take place. 

Nominator*! must designate when making paymenta to atnrt whether the horae 
entered la a Trotter or Pncer. 

Colta that start at two yeara old are not barred from atartlng again In the three- 
year-old divisions. 

Be Sure to Make This Payment. 



E. P. HEALD, I'res. 



F. W. KELLEY, See'y. 

3tWi Pacific I?ldg.,San Francisco 



California Breeders Association 

Canfield - Clark Stakes No. 2 

To be raced under the auspices of the California Breeders Association 
for foals of 1909 to be raced as 2-year-olds in 1911. 

Entries to close February 1, '10. 

$ 1 000 Guaranteed Purse for Trotters 



ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS. 



Feb. 1, '10, $5; Nov. 1, '10, $10; April 1, '11, $10; final payment, $25, 

ten days before the meeting begins at which the race is to be trotted. Noth- 
ing additional from money winners. 



CONDITIONS. 



Mile heats, 2 In 3. Distance, 150 yards. Entry must be accompanied by 
entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment 
forfeits all previous payments. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen this stake in case the number of 
entries received is not satisfactory. 

Money divided 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. 

Write for entry blank and further information to 



C. A. CANFIEI.D, President. 



WW. I,. JAMES, Secretary, 
317 West 17th St., Lo« Angelea, Cnl 



The Stallion Number 



-OF THE- 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Will be Issued Feb. 26, '10 



It will have a handsome cover in colors, contain many 
plete with matter interesting to breeders and horsemen. 



lustrations and be re- 



IF YOU OWN A STALLION 



don't fail to advertise him in this number, as an advertisement in this issue will 
reach every owner of a good mare on this coast, besides having an extensive circula- 
tion throughout the United States, Australia and the Hawaiian Islands. 



IF YOU OWN A MARE 



you will find this number interesting and valuable, as it will contain the stallion an- 
nouncements, giving particulars as to description, pedigree, terms, etc. , of all the 
best stallions on the coast, and from these announcements you can decide on what 
stallion will nick best with your mare. 

EVERY ONE INTERESTED IN HARNESS HORSES 

will be interested in reading this number, as it will contain statistics, news, and 
articles that will make it entertaining reading and valuable to preserve as a work of 
reference. 

AS AN ADVERTISING MEDIUM 

not only for stallions, but for general advertisers who wish to reach the Horsemen, 
Horse Breeders, Farmers and those who are interested in Field Nports, it will be 
particularly valuable. 



OWNERS OF STALLIONS 



who wish illustrations of their horses to appear in this issue should have photo- 
graphs prepared without delay and send in their orders for space. A specially low 
price has been decided on for advertising in this issue, placing it within the reach of 
all. Write; fur price and particulars to 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 

San Francisco 



PALITE 45062 



A Sire of Early Speed. 



Sire NutWOOd WilkeS 2"I6t~ s'rooft'opa de Oro 2:01J4..Tohn A. McKerron 2:04%. etc. .and 



dams of Sim Francisco 2:07%, Moim Wilkes 2M%. etc. 



r\„ m Dolito I 1\ 1-ln flam of 2 in list: second dam Klsie. dam of 5;thlrd dam Elaine 2:20, 
Udlll, rdllld ^4^ 4.IU, dam Of 4; fourth dam firecn Mountain Maid, dam of 9. 

I'AMTK Is the sire of the 2-year-old . stake winner I'al and of the :!-year-old filly Com- 

plete, second to the Occident Stake winner HI Volatile in 2:1.'%, and timed separately in 2:\V/i. I'a- 
lite is one of the best bred stallions of the Wllkes-Klectloneer cross living. Ills colts are all trotters, 
good iraited and determined. 

He will make the season of l'.M" at tho ranch of the undersigned at 

DIXON, CAL. Terms: $40 for the Season ^XT^^^^^ M " my 

(iood pasturage at $2.50 per month and best of care taken of mares, but no responsibility as- 
sumed for accidents or escapes. 

For further particulars address 

E. D. DUDLEY, (Own r). Dixon, Cal. 



Take the Breeder and Sportsman. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 15, 1910. 



A Whirlwind Finish! 

Mr. Woolfolk Henderson, of Lexington, Ky., who lias made an unprecedented record during the year 1909, shot at Houston, Texas, 

December 20-22, with the following results: 



High Amateur Average, 



800 x 825. 



Longest Run, Unfinished, 



252 Straight. High Gun, Last Day, . 274 x 275 



At this shoot Mr. Henderson used the same load in 



PETERS SHELLS 

that he has shot throughout the year. His scores are an eloquent witness to the shooting efficiency of these goods. See a little later 

advertisement for full particulars. 



New York: 98 Chambers St., T. H. Keller, Mgr. 

San Francisco: «0S-«12 Howard St., J. S. French, Mar. 

New Orleans: 321 Magazine St., J. \\ . Osborne, Mgr. 



THE PETERS CARTRIDGE COMPANY, CINCINNATI, 0. 

The Annual Short -Horn Sales 



MRS. J. H. GLIDE will be held 

m January 24, 1910 

The (ireenwood ottering comprises 

25 head yearling and two-year-old bulls, 15 head choice 
cows and heifers, 

including lirst prize winners at Alaska-Yukon-Exposition. 




HOWARD CATTLE CO., win be hew 

■ January 25, 1910 

The Howard Cattle Company ottering comprises 

35 head yearling and two-year-old bulls, 20 head choice 
heifers. 

Ottering includes sons of the twice grand Champion of America 
Lavender Viscount 124755; also hulls strong in the blood of 
the champion Choice Goods 186802. 



These Offerings Exceed in Number and Equal in Quality the Banner Sale of 1909. 
In Sales Pavilion of FRED. H. CHASE & CO., 478 Valencia St., San Francisco. 

For catalogue and further particulars apply to 
MRS. J. H. GLIDE, 910 H. St., Sacramento, Cal. HOWARD CATTLE CO., 641 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal 



$5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



—THE— 



State Fair Futurity Stakes No. 2 

Foals of Mares Covered in 1 909 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 



$5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



$2850 for Trotting Foals. 



$2150 for Pacing Foals. 



TO BE GIVEN BY THE- 



CALIFORNIA STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, Sacramento, Cal. 

Entries to close February 1, '10. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when 

mare was bred. 

FOR TWO-YEAR-OLDS to take place at the California State Fair, 1912 

Two-Year-Old Trotters, • • • $600 
Two-Year-Old Pacers, ... 400 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when 

mare was bred. 

FOR THREE-YEAR-OLDS to take place at the California State Fair, 1913 

Three-Year-Old Trotters, • • • $1400 
Three-Year-Old Pacers, • • • $1100 



Consolations for Horses That Started in Above and Won No Money. 

ENTRANCE FREE— Otherwise same conditions to govern as in the main events. 

TWO-YEAR-OLD TROTTERS, *3.-,0; TWO-YEAR-OLD PACERS, $250. THREE- YE ARNOLD TROTTERS, !MO<>: THREE-YEAR-OLD PACERS, *:««». 

EM'RAXCE AND PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on February 1, 1910. when name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 July 1, 1910; 
$5 December 1, 1910; $10 on yearlings February 1, 1911; $10 on two-year-olds February 1, 1912; $10 on three year olds February 1, 1913. 

STAKTINU PAYMENTS — $15 to start in the two-year-old pace, $25 to start in the two-year-old trot; $35 to start in the three-year-old pace; $50 to start in the 
the three-year-old trot. All starting payments to be made ten days before the first day of the State Fair, at which the race is to take place. 

No additional entrance will he charged in the Consolation Stakes. 

Nominators must designate when making; payments to start whether the horse entered is :i Trotter or Pacer, 
c oils (hut start nt two years old are not barred from starting nenin In the three-year-old divisions. 

CONDITIONS. 

The races for two-year-olds will be mile heats, two in three, and for three-year-olds, three in five, instance for two-year-olds, 150 yards; for three-year-olds, 

100 yards. 

If a mare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins, or if either the autre or foal dies before February I, 1111 1, her nominator may sell or transfer his 
nomination or substitute another mare or foal, regardless of o wn e rs hip; hut there will be no return of ii payment, nor will any entry be liable for more than amount 
paid in or eontraeled for. In entries, the nnme, eolor and pedigree of mare must he given; also the name of the horse to which she was bred In I 

Kntries must be accompanied by the entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $5000, the amount of 
the guarantee, only. Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacing divisions. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Races for Two-Year-Old Stake and Consolation end with the conclusion of the third heat. 
Races for Three- Year-Old Stake and Consolation end with the conclusion of fifth heat. 

Money divided in each division of the Stake 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division than there are starters. 

All contestants not winning a heat in three or awarded second position twice will be retired from the race, but do not forfeit their winnings as shown by the 

summary. 

Kntries open to the world. 

Write for Entry Illauks to 

H. A. JASTRO, President. J. A. FILCHER, Sec'y, Sacramento, Cal. 

Other than exceptions made in tills entry blank rules of National Trotting Association to govern. 



Saturday, January 15, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



15 



GOLCHER BROS. 

(Formerly of Clabrough. Golcher 4 Co.) 




Fine Fishing Tackle, Guns, Sporting and Outing Goods 

Phon. T^,por.ry lass. 5I0 M ar k e t St., San Francisco 



MANUFACTURERS 
*»P OUTFITTERS. 

FOR THE I 

SPORTSMAN 
CAMPER*! 
ATHLETE. 



48-52 GEARY ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EQUIPMENT 
*!!? APPARATUS 

| FOR 

EV ERY NE ED. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
SUPPLIES. 



PHIL. B. BEKEART CO., 

SOLE PACIFIC COAST BRANCH 



No Stock Carried. 
Goods Sold to the Trade Only 



For various manufacturers of Fire Arms, Sporting Goods, 
and Fishing Tackle. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



No road too rough . Carries 
weight over the wheels, not 
on the axle. It has the 
strength. Never a tired driv- 
er after a long workout day. 
Why? The long spring makes 
it easy riding. and does away 
with all horse motion. Furn- 
ished with either Pneumatic 
or cushion tires . 



McMurray 

Sulkies and 
Jogging Carts 

Standard the world over. 

Address for printed matter and prices. 

W. J. KENNEY, HKS** 
531 Valencia St., San Francisco 



75 PER CENT 



OF ALL HORSE OWNERS 

AND TRAINERS 



USE AND RECOMMEND 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE FOOT REMEDY 



-SOLD BY— 




Sol. DeutNch Snn Frnnclsco, Cal. 

Pierce Cotter Co Los Angeles, Cn I. 

R. Grunt Potter Sacramento, Cnl. 

Miller <& Patterson Snn Diego, Cal. 

J. G. Read & Bro. . Ogden, ITtau 

E. H. Irish Butte, Mont. 

A. A. Kraft Co Spokane, Wash. 

Tlios. M. Henderson Seattle, Wash. 

C. Rodder Stockton, Cal. 

Wm. ID. Detels Plensanton, Cal. 

V. Koch San Jose, Cal. 

Keystone Bros. .... .San Francisco, Cal. 

Fred Reedy Fresno, Cal. 

Jim. McKerron San Francisco, Cal. 

Jos. McTigue San Francisco, Cal. 

Brydon Bros Los Angeles, Cal. 



Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs 
Act, June 30, ltM)6. Serial Number 1219. 



JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison Street, Chicago. 



ROSS McMAHON 



Awning and Tent Co. 

Camp Furniture, Awnings, Hammocks and Covers in stock and to order. 
Flags and Banners. 

Phone Kearny 2030. 403 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



HOUSTON, TEXAS, December 20-22, I909. 

97 per cent on 825 Targets 

With Long Huns of 

129 Straight on December 21 

Unfinished on December 22 



This remarkable shooting by Mr. Woolfolk Henderson makes a 
fitting close to the records of the year 1909. 

We have been continually recommending to our friends the use 
of Regular and Reliable brands of Smokeless at the traps 
and in the field and the above score is only another example of 
Results when using 




SMOKELESS SPORTING POWDERS 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS POWDER CO. 

Established 1802. Wilmington, Delaware. 

The Powder Pioneers of America. 




AN UNPARALLELED RECORD IN SHOOTING HISTORY MADE BY THE PARKER GUN. 

At Chicago, the week beginning June 21, Mr. Frank Fisher won the Preliminary Hnndicap from 
the 1H yard mark, shooting at ten doubles and eighty singles— score, 94. 

Mr. Fred BhattUCk won the (fraud American Hnndicap from the 18 yard mark— score. 9fi, and 3D 
straight in the shoot-off. 

Mr. Fred Gilbert again won the Professional Championship with a score of 193 out of '200. which 
included 10 doubles, of which he broke l!7. making his second consecutive winning of this classic 
event, and the fourth consecutive winning for the PA KKKU GUN. 

TI1K PARKER GUN also won the High General Average for the entire tournament, thus winning 
about all there was in sight. 

PARKER BROS., M ER I DEN. CONN. toid..tc un Buiid.r. m Am.rie..: 

New York Salesrooms, 32 Warren St. 



bril He Wonh Saving?, 




Why trade off or sell at a beggarly price a good 
horse just because he "goes lanv\" "throws a 
curb" or develops some other blemish? There 
Is nothing In the way of Spavins, Curbs. Splints 
Wlndpuffs or Bunches which will not yielc 
readily and permanently to treatment with 

QUINN'S 

**T OINTMENT. 

K. D. I>nvenp<-rt. a prominent phyRlHo 



leridrui lnd., 
ie lemoviil of 
IN (re nrrnilv, but for 
1 have tMt«d It thor 
aurl pur without BHltaaoj tint it is the only re liable r«-in*>- 
evertrlHri.'' price 91.00 par bottle. Bald by all di u^'lsts of 

Whitehall. N.Y. 



ri ten : I have u-ed a number c 
m hH. ■plIntK, thicken, d tendons a ml 1 1* 
not been without Qulnn's Ointment. 



W. B. Eddy & Co. 




Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 



16 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 15, 1910. 



Fine 

Harness... 



The Best Horse Boots 




ORSE BOOTS 



The only 
Manufacturer 
of 

Horse Boots 

on the 
Pacific Coast. 






f 



Shoot the Shells With Steel 
Protection Around the Smokeless Powder. 



You get that protection in U. M. C. Arrow and Nitro Club brands which are the only shells made in America lined with steel. Yet you pay 
no more than you do for the unlined makes. 

It will pay you to buy your shells carefully, for the Steel Lining does several very important things: It keeps out the moistuie, protects the 
gun and the shooter because it makes the shell stronger and safer, and improves the shooting in every way. 

1909 U. IM. C. Came Laws & Guide Directory Free. 
THE UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., Bridgeport, Conn. Agency, 315 Broadway, New York City. 




WINCHESTER 

Guns and Ammunition. 



THEY NEVER FAILED ME. 



HARRY WHITNEY 



From the frozen north as well as from sunny Africa comes more enduring praise for the entire reliability of Winchester 
< inns and Ammunition — the Red W Krand. Harry Whitney, who recently returned from the Arctic, where he spent 
fourteen months and hunted farther North and achieved greater success than any sportsman ever did before, wisely 
pinned his faith to the Red W combination. He says of it: 

"I used two Winchesters: A Model '95 .30-40 and a .22 Automatic and Winchester Cartridges with both. 
Neither the extreme cold nor rough handling affected their working or accuracy. They never failed me." 

THE EQUIPMENT OF MEN OF ACHIEVEMENT. 



In the Marsh or Field 

Selby Loads 

Get the Limit Bags. 
Ask the Shooter Who KNOWS! 




SELBY SMELTING & LEAD CO., 



San Francisco, Cal. 



VOLUME LVI. No. 4. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 22, 1910. 



Subscription— $3.00 Per Year. 




AEROLITE (3) 2:llf 

Bay etallion, foaled 1904, by Searchlight 2:03^, dam Trix (dam of Mona Wilkes 2:Q3X> Moortrlx 2:07%, etc.), by Nutwood Wilkes 2:1(>>£. 
Sold January 8, 1910, by J. W. Marshall of Dixon Cal., to C. L. Gifford, of Lewiston, Idaho, for $8,000. 



I 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1910. 



Sen satio nal Annou n cement 

FOR THE PLEASANTON SALE 

Owing to his continued illness, Mr. Frank J. Kilpatrick consigns his six great three-year-old stallions which he brought here last year, viz: 



BLACK HALL by Ozono (son of Moko) out of Maggie Yeazer, 

dam of Walnut Hall 2:08i etc. 
OLIVER TODD by Todd 2:l4f, out of Olive Brady by Cyclone. 

MOKO HALL by Walnut Hall 2:08 j. out of a mare by Moko; sec- 
ond dam by Simmons 2:28, etc. 



GOVERNOR CONST ANTINE by Con.tantine 2:I2£, out of 

Nevada by Onward 2:05|. etc. 
GERALD JAY by the great sire Jay Bird, out of Black Annie by 
Bourbon Wilkes, etc. 

GRANT CONSTANTINE by Constantine 2:\H, out of Viva- 
cious 2:17 by Bernal 2:24, etc. 



Everybody will attend the Third Annual Pleasanton Sale 

OF STANDARD-BRED 

TROTTERS and PACERS ****** »» d* e The First Week in March, 1910 



BESIDES THE ABOVE THERE WILL BE OFFERED 

descendants of McKinney 2:11 l 4, Diablo 2:09' 4, Boodle 2M2!4i Altamont 2:26, 
Whips 2:27! 4 . Nushagak, Monicrat 2:13' 2 , Zombro 2:11, Searchlight 2:03'/4, 
Easter W., The Limit, Guy Wilkes 2:15'/4, Athablo 2:24%, Dexter Prince, De- 
monio 2:11!4, Lecco 2:09%, Monterey 2:09' 4 . Silver Bow 2:16, Sir John (trial 
2:14) by McKinney 2:111;,. Strathway 2:19, Monbells 2:23, Kinney Lou 2:07%, 
Zolock 2:05' 4 , Alconda Jay, Prince Lovelace, Baron Bowles (3) 2:25, Peveril by 
Alaric, McKenna (son of McKinney 2:11' 4 ), Clay S. 2:16, Palite (sire of Pal 
2:17i/ 2 ). 

There never was such an aggregation of royally bred ones 
offered at auction in California before ! 



FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF CONSIGNEES: 

Frank J. Kilpatrick, San Francisco; C. L. Crellin, Pleasanton; Henry Struvw, 
Watsonville; J. E. Montgomery, Pleasanton: Estate of F. P. Hellwig, Alvarado; 
J. C. Armstrong, A. Goulart, Santa Rita: A. Edstrom. Oakland; H. Busing, 
Pleasanton; S. B. Van Dervoort, Irvington: Frank M. Gray, Los Gatos; Rush & 
Haile, Suisun; M. C. Keefer, Woodland; James J. Morrisey, Oakland, Cal.; A. R. 
Shreve, Portland, Ore.; C. E. Bronbauger, T. C. Wallic, of Los Banos; Harry 
McFadyen, of Dixon; Win. Hendrickson, San Jose; etc. 

Owners of good '"prospects" who wish to get the very highest prices for 
them can make no mistake in consigning them to this sale immediately, as 
entries close February 1st, and a limited number can only be sold. Send for 
entry blanks. 

Good Horses Bring Big Prices at Pleasanton! 



We Promised to have a big sale and we will keep that Promise. 



FRED H. CHASE & CO., AUCTIONEERS, 



478 Valencia St., San Francisco. 



DISTILLED 



ifernloc 

%j j -NAME REGlSnRED- ^^^^^^ 8 ^^- PATENTED, APRIL 21*! 1908- 



EXTRACT 




Adam G. with (has. f>e Ryder lip, 



" Fernlock is without 
uuestion the best body 
and leg wash yet offered 
to horsemen. It is also 
a superior liniment. 

Chas. Dk Kydkr." 




" I think it a per- 
fect leg wash and lo- 
tion. 

E". F. Geeks." 



FERNLOC is Nature's Greatest Body Wash and Liniment. 
Contains 20 per cent. Grain Alcohol. 



It always 

Increases Speed, Stimulates 
and Strengthens, Producing 
Staying Qualities. 



It always 

Induces a Healthy Circulation. 
Prevents Congestion, Chills and 
Colds. 



It always removes Soreness. Rheumatism. Inflammation and Stiffness from muscles 

and tendons. 



FERNLOC does not Stain or Blister. It produces a Smooth. Healthy. Skin and Hair. 
" YOU CANNOT USE IT WRONG." 



1 )ne tial. lugs. $3. Five Hal. Jugs. $10. Half Barrel and Barrels. $1.50 per Oal. 

Ask for books and circulars giving full information and directions. 



I>F. \I F.Its WHO 8K1X ri:n\l.(lf. 

J, (;. Read A Broa <>Kden, Utah 

Jenkins A Hro Suit Lake City, I tali 

K. II. Irish Butte, Mont. 

O. H. Neatoe Spokane, Waah. 

HiiNkn Harneaa Co Tacoma, Waah. 

T. M. Henderson Seattle, \\ iinIi. 

Keller Harneaa Co Portland, Or«». 

VI. II. Harris Saddlery Co Mnryxville, Cal. 

H. Graal Patter SaerameatOj Cal, 

\\ . Em Datala Pleaaantoa^ CaL 

J. \. I.cmIm . . . Denver, Coli>. 

\\ . J. l\ e an," J San Frnilelxen, Cal. 

lto>ften lit 1 n I. on \nu:eleM. CaL 

l oveti Drug <o Phoenix, \rix. 

West Tezaa Saddle t o El I'asa, Texas 

Manufactured by 

THE FORESTINE COMPANY, 

Williamsport, Pa. 



The First National Bank 

Corner Post and Montgomery Streets 

Complete Banking 
Service 

I. The First National Bank fully equipped for commercial business. 

II. First Federal Trust Company, associated with the First National Bank, 
pays interest on deposits, and takes entire charge of property, real and personal. 

III. Armor l'late Safe Deposit Vaults, the highest type of security, guarantee 
absolute protection for valuables. 

Inspection Invited 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 



McKinney Speed 2:02. 



TWO COOP OWES. 



Demonio Speed 2:03 



Gen- J- B. Frisbie 41637 

Handsome son of McKinney 2:11%, greatest sire of the age (22 with records from 
«■(>■> to 210)- dam the ereat broodmare Daisy S. (dam of Tom Smith 2:13%. sire 
Of katafina 2:11%. General Vallejo 2:22%, Little Mac (3) 2:27. Sweet Rosie 2:28%. 
ValleJo Girl •>• 10 V4, and Prof. Heald 2:23) by McDonald Chief 3583. son of Clark 
Chief 89- second dam Fanny Rose, great broodmare (dam of Geo. Washington 
' 1G« Columbus S. 2:1"), by Ethan Allen Jr. 2993. General J. B. Frisbie Is hand- 
some, good-gaited. black, nine years old. He is a full brother to Tom Smith 2:13%. 
FEE: $25 for the Season. Usual return privilege or money refunded. 



Demonio 28016 



Race Record 2:11 



DKMONIO 2:11>4 is the sire of Mona Wilkes 2:03%, Memonio 2:09%, Demonio 
Wilkes 2:09%, Miss Winn 2:12%, Normono (2) 2:14%. and grandsire i of Solano 
Boy 2 07 % He is one of the best sons of that great sire Charles Derby 2:20, 
which has 8 in the 2:10 list and whose sons rank high among the greatest pro- 
ducers of speed in the world. Demonlo's dam is the great broodmare Bertha 
(dam of Don Derby 2:04%. Owvho 2:07%. Derbertha 2:07%, Diabb 2:09%, and 5 
others in 2:30 list) by Alcantara 729, next dam Harcina by Bayard 53, next dam 
Blandina by Hambletonlan 10. 

FEE FOH THE SEASON * n>. For a limited number of approved outside mares. 

Usual return privilege. Excellent pasturage at $3 per month. Good care 
taken of mares, but no responsibility assumed. For further information address 

RUSH «V II VII, i:, SiiIhuh, CaL 



Saturday, January 22, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



<7=^.THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 

F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 


Turf and Sporting Authority of tha Pacific Coast. 
OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACIFIC BUILDING, 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts. , San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco Post-Office. 



Terms — One Year, $3; Six Months, $1.75; Three Months, $1. 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley. P. O. Drawer 447, San Francisco, Calif. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name 
and address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private 
guarantee of good faith. 



THE EFFORT TO SUPPRESS GAMBLING on 
horse races has thus far only resulted in curtailing 
it. In New York Governor Hughes and those who 
desire the complete suppression of betting, are call- 
ing for an amendment to the law which will make 
even oral betting a crime. Here in California the 
Otis-Walker law passed by the last legislature has 
not closed the running tracks as predicted, nor im- 
proved the tone of racing, but it has certainly greatly 
curtailed betting and made the racing game much 
less profitable to the associations. The daily press 
has recently given publicity to a report that an effort 
will be made at the next session of the legislature to 
amend the Otis-Walker law so that auction and 
mutual pools may be sold on horse races and other 
contests of speed. It is given out that the driving 
clubs of California will lend their influence to have 
such an amendment passed so that the sport of har- 
ness racing may be more profitably conducted during 
the summer months in California. There is much to 
fear in such an amendment, however, as were auc- 
tion and mutual pools made legal in California and 
the season unlimited as to duration, the running meet- 
ings would probably continue from one end of the 
year to the other, and this would do more to injure 
the sport of legitimate racing than anything that 
could happen. What is needed in this State is a law 
that will limit racing with betting to not more than 
20 days during the year in any county. It might also 
be wise to prohibit any association giving more than 
twenty days of racing during the year, as otherwise 
some running organizations might give twenty days in 
each of five or six contiguous counties, thus making 
the season of running racing as long as it was before 
the Otis-Walker law was passed, when the season ex- 
tended from October to May. Retting solely by auc- 
tion and mutual pools would accomplish one thing — 
it would take the betting out of the hands of the pro- 
fessional gamblers who now control it. The sport of 
horse racing is beyond all doubt the most popular 
sport in the world. When one thinks of the number 
of running, trotting and pacing horses that are in 
training every year in the United States alone, and 
realizes that at least $200 is spent on each one of 
them, one marvels at the extent of the sport. There 
are over two thousand harness race meetings held in 
the United States every year, and the breeding and 
training of trotters and pacers annually represents 
an outlay of millions of dollars. In a majority of 
the States and at nearly all these one-week meetings, 
betting is permitted and the greater part of it done 
by the auction and mutual systems. This has not 
been looked upon as a source of any great evil even 
in the puritan States, but when the bookmaker and 
continuous racing came in, there soon arose a cry 
against race track gambling that finally resulted in 
laws that were designed to suppress all betting of 
any sort, because the legislators could not discrimi- 
nate between the different systems. Harness horse- 
men all over the -country realize that the anti 
gambling crusade has never been directed at the 
suppression of legitimate racing, but feeling that some 
of their privileges have been taken from them many 
have been led to side with the bookmakers in their 
fight against the alleged reformers who can see noth- 
ing but evil in any betting. In most States it has 
been this attitude of the harness horsemen that has 
prevented them from getting reasonable race track 
legislation. There is an irreconcilable conflict be- 
tween the bookmaking fraternity that controls the 
race tracks and the people who oppose them, and 
the harness horsemen will never profit by an alli- 
ance with the former. Had the men who are Inter- 
ested in the breeding, training and racing of harness 
horses in California, organized and sent representa- 



tives to the Legislature a year ago this winter to ad- 
vocate the passage of a bill that would have pro- 
hibited long-continued meetings and bookmaking, we 
do not doubt but their influence would have been 
strong enough to have an amendment made to the 
Otis-Walker bill that would have permitted all the 
driving clubs and the State and county fairs to give 
limited racing with betting by auction and mutual 
pools. Any and every person who ever attended 
the race meetings held by the Pacific Coast Trotting 
Horse Breeders' Association, the county fairs, and the 
many driving clubs in California before the Otis- 
Walker bill was passed, knows there was no evil 
in the limited betting that prevailed, but that it added 
a zest to the sport that was absent last year when 
betting was prohibited. If this old and respected 
style of racing could be revived in California It would 
be of great benefit to the horse breeding industry, 
and we believe it can be if the harness horsemen will 
unite and make an appeal to the Legislature, but if 
any alliance is made with the bookmakers and the 
running associations, defeat is certain and will be 
deserved. Lack of organization of the thousands of 
taxpayers and voters who are directly and indirectly 
interested in the breeding, raising, training and rac- 
ing of light harness horses is the one thing that 
prevents harness racing being as popular a sport in 
California as it is in the East and Middle West. At 
the many great State and county fairs held in those 
localities and also in Oregon, all sorts of amusements 
are provided to attract large crowds, but by each and 
every association that is making a success of its 
annual fair, harness racing is considered to be by 
far the greatest attraction, and the only one that 
will draw the people and hold them for five or six 
days. There is not one organization that we know 
of, which is now giving successful fairs whose offi- 
cers do not believe that bookmaking as practiced on 
this coast, would soon kill the popularity of its 
annual exposition, but they all hold that were auc- 
tion and mutual betting permitted, the crowds would 
be still larger, and the profits of the fair still greater. 
The reason is that these modes of betting are con- 
trolled by the associations themselves and profes- 
sional gamblers have no interest in them. Those who 
enjoy "having a bet down" can wager as much or 
as little as they choose, but there are no touts or 
steerers making themselves obnoxious by button- 
holing every visitor and inducing him to patronize 
the bookmakers. Horse-racing with this sort of 
betting is a grand sport and a gentleman's game, and 
no organization that gives it ever thinks of holding 
more than two or three weeks of racing during the 
year. If legislation can be secured that will permit 
racing with betting on these lines in California a 
great good will be done the horse breeding industry 
and the evil of professional race gambling will be 
struck a blow harder than has yet been given it here, 
in New York or elsewhere. . 

o 

CHASE'S PLEASANTON SALE. 

Every day brings additions to the big sale to' 
be held by Fred W. Chase & Co. during the first week 
in March at the famous Pleasanton race track. Be- 
sides the consignment of Mr. Frank J. Kilpat rick s 
royally-bred stallions (and there are no finer bred 
ones anywhere) there are some of the best racing 
"prospects," matinee horses, grandly-bred brood- 
mares, handsome standard bred colts and fillies ever 
offered in California. Almost every fashionable trot- 
ting family in America will be represented and all 
must be sold. The atention of our readers is called 
to the advertisement and next week the additional 
names will include many that have been praised 
highly by horsemen. These are to be sold because 
the owners want to see them go into the hands of 
men who will train them. The very best will be 
catalogued. It is almost unnecessary to repeat the 
fact that there is a scarcity of high class trotters 
and pacers and seekers after these are more plenti- 
ful than ever. The last sale held in Pleasanton was 
one of the best ever seen in California, big prices 
being realized and those who attended and pur- 
chased are delighted with those which they selected, 
so much so that few, if any, have been sold by these 
owners; they prefer to keep them knowing that they 
secured bargains, even if the prices seemed high at 
the time. This sale this year will undoubtedly sur- 
pass that. Owners who want to get the very high- 
est prices for their horses should avail themselves 
of this golden opportunity by sending for entry 
blanks and consigning all they wish to sell to this 
sale. Remember entries will close February 1st and 
as the number offered will be limited, it behooves 
horse owners to attend to this important matter at 
once, for this will be one of the best advertised 
and best catalogued sales of the year and every- 
thing possible will be done regarding the care of 
horses consigned and nothing will be left undone 
to make this a memorable event for sellers and 
buyers. 



OUR LOS ANGELES LETTER. 



Los Angeles, Jan. 18, 1910. 

After several pleasant days last week it began 
raining Saturday morning and the matinee of the 
Los Angeles Driving Club advertised for that day 
had to be declared off. 

That there are a few horsemen left here and who 
are dead game sports as well, is shown by the 
match that was made some time ago between C. A. 
Canfield and E. A. Montgomery. They have each 
backed a colt of their own to go to bike carts, mile 
heats, two in three, this fall,, as two-year-olds dur- 
ing the regular meeting, for $200 a side; owners to 
drive. C. A. Canfield names his bay colt Dick Wal- 
lace by Walter Barker, and Mr. Montgomery his Red 
McK. colt Victor Mc. 

A few such sporty matches would go far toward 
reviving an interest here in the trotting and breed- 
ing business and there are enough colts owned here 
to make a full day's racing. 

Harry Messmore has turned over his two-year-old 
filly by Audubon Boy 1:59*4 to C. T. Hewitt to begin 
work on. She is not very big but a very nicely 
built, breedy looking young lady and already shows 
a good way of going at a trot. She is the only 
filly Audubon Boy has got out here, though he left 
five or six colts, among them those of Sapovida, 
Stewart and Joe Williams. 

The entries to the Canfleld-Clark $1000 purse for 
two-year-olds have already begun to come in and a 
liberal patronage seems probable. 

Will Durfee is on the mend and though not in 
shape to go many hard heats, he is able to be out 
and jogging his horses. He has as good looking a 
lot of things as any one could wish to see, especially 
a black colt by Del Coronado and one by Zoloek. 
The Del Coronado colt is not only fast but would be 
a show winner anywhere. He is a good deal on 
the order of C. A. Durfee's Almaden. 

Walter Maben has a four-year-old filly by Durfee's' 
Del Coronado that is probably the best thing of her 
age at the track. She is a strapping big girl, bay 
in color, as pure gaited a trotter as can be, has two- 
minute speed and is out of a James Madison mare 
with one by A. W. Richmond as second dam and 
like all Maben's string, good headed and with the 
best of manners in or out of the stable, either op' 
the track or road. 

Charlie Thayer has sold his stud Six Bells and 
is devoting his time to his three-year-old by that 
horse, and to a big strong going pacer. 

Charlie Nickerson at last took the "brakes off" 
Geo. M. Vail's big five-year-old gelding Pedro, and 
let him step a mile the other day in 2:19% with 
the last quarter in 32 seconds. When he and Mr. 
Vail got back to the barn there was a long consulta- 
tion in the track stall, but whether it had anything 
to do with a nomination in the M. and M. I could not 
find out. His other "trick" Belle Pepper, paced a 
last quarter of a slow mile in 30 seconds, so they 
may have been talking of the Chamber of Com- 
merce Stake. 

As soon as J. S. Stewart who is training the black 
mare Lady Mack by Zombro, for John McLean, gets 
her to leave the wire at the same clip she comes to 
it her owner will stake her over the half mile tracks 
East next fall and will probaly send her through tin- 
Maryland and Virginia Circuit which opens at Balti- 
more, Md. There is good over-night betting all 
through, besides the pooling the day of the race. 
The races are generally sold "field and favorite' 1 
though some of the pools are "sold down." Lady 
Mack has won several matinee races here and can 
step a last half in 1:03 or better. When the track 
closes here Stewart will more than likely take his 
string to the half-mile track at Pasadena and put 
the straps on the mare and teach her to get away. 

Nickerson, with Vail's horses will, I am told go to 
the same track, and I don't doubt Frank Williams 
will have William Morgan's horses, including Eva 
2:10 at the same place. 

A luncheon club of horsemen, including J. L Chris- 
topher, W. A. Clark Jr., W. A. Glascock, John W. 
Nickerson, John W. Snowden, C. C. Colyear and 
half a dozen others, has been in existence here for 
a year and a half, meeting every Ttfesday at" Chris- 
topher's. A number of deals and trades are made 
round the table and today it was decided that here- 
after 10 per cent should be levied on every sale, 
to go to the treasury to provide prize fight tickets 
or pew rent for the members. JAMES. 

o 

BILLINGS' FIRST HORSE. 



C. K. G. Billings, who has paid a larger sum of 
money for trotters and pacers to drive on the road 
and in amateur matinee races, and owned more of 
(hem. than any ten horse lovers in the country, tells 
of a very sad experience in the first horse he ever 
owned in his life. 

When quite a young man, Mr. Billings fancied a 
fast trotting mare priced to him at $2000, but not 
having more than $500 to his name, he persuaded 
his mother to advance him the balance, which she 
did after much begging. In due time his father 
heard of the fast trotter his son had bought and 
expressed a desire to try her. 

The request was complied with, and after a few 
spins on the road the old gentleman asked how 
much he had paid for her. "Six hundred dollars, 
father," was the answer. 

"Well, Charley, the mare is not worth it," said 
I he governor, "but I rather like the way she steps, 
so I will take her from you and you can have your 
$(!00." The deal had to be. closed.— Kentucky Stock 
Farm. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1910. 



AEROLITE SOLD FOR $8000. 



James W. Marshall of Dixon Sells the Great Son of 
Searchlight to C. L. Gifford of Idaho. 

Another great young California horse has been 
sold for a long price and will leave this State. On 
Saturday of last week. Mr. C. L. Gifford of Lewiston, 
Idaho, purchased from James W. Marshall of Dixon, 
California, the five-year-old pacing stallion Aerolite, 
three-year-old race record 2:11%, with a public trial 
the same year of 2:05%, which equals the worlds 
record for three-year-olds. 

Mr. Gifford, who is a prosperous farmer and stock- 
raiser of Idaho, recently sold one of his large ranches 
for a big price, and being an enthusiastic horseman 
came to California to look for a free-legged pacing 
stallion with which to head a breeding farm which 
he will establish at Lewiston. Mr. Gifford owns a 
dozen or more well bred mares — all pacers, we be- 
lieve, and concluded he would like to have a high 
class pacing stallion to mate them with. He came 
to California accompanied by his wife, who is also 
much interested in horses, and went to Mr. Marshall's 
place to look at a young stallion by Zolock. When 
they saw Aerolite however the other horse did not 
have as strong an attraction for them, and after a 
day or two of negotiating they finally concluded that 
the son of Searchlight was the horse they wanted 
and paid Mr. Marshall his price — $8000 — for this 
splendid young horse. 

Aerolite 2:11% is now six years old, having been 
foaled in 1904. He was bred by Mr. Marshall and 
was trained by Sutherland & Chadbourne of Pleas- 
anton, being driven to his record as a three-year-old 
by Fred Chadbourne at Petaluma, Cal., in 1907. A 
few days later at Woodland. Mr. Chadbourne intended 
to give Aerolite a fast public trial at Woodland, but 
on the day set was taken sick and Mr. Sutherland 
drove the colt. Aerolite was hooked to a cart, and 
Mr. Sutherland drove without a whip, but the won- 
derful colt stepped the mile in 2:05%, equaling the 
world's record for three-year-olds. The last half of 
this mile was paced in 1:00%, each of the last two 
quarters being in 30%. By a majority of the watches 
held Aerolite paced faster than the time hung out, 
several expert timers getting the mile in 2:04%, 
but as it was only a trial and one of the timers 
caught it in 2:05%, at the request of Mr. Marshall 
that was the time announced, and it has never been 
questioned but Aerolite paced the mile that fast. 

As a two-year-old Aerolite made but one start 
which was in the Pacific Breeders' pacing futurity, 
worth $750. There were three starters Aerolite, Hy- 
mettus by Zombro and Search Georgie by Search- 
light. Aerolite won the race in straight heats in 
2:15% and 2:18%. 

In his three-year-old form he started in three races. 
His first race was at Pleasanton where he met the 
filly Josephine by Zolock that now has a record of 
2:07% and the filly Beulah by Nutwood Wilkes. After 
beating these two easily in 2:26 and 2:21, Chad- 
bourne got the judges to waive distance and stepped 
the last mile in 2:14% as easy as breaking sticks. 
When Santa Rosa was reached the three-year-old 
Breeders' Futurity for pacers had only Aerolite and 
Hymettus as starters. Aerolie was not right that 
day and he made a break in the first heat, some- 
thing unusual for him when going at any speed, and 
continued to act that way in the race Hymettus beat- 
ing him in straight heats in 2:08%. 2:14 and 2:13. 
The following week at Petaluma, over a rough track 
Aerolite defeated Josephine, Hymettus and Radium 
in 2:12%, 2:11% and 2:15%, after a collision in the 
first heat with Hymettus, Josephine taking the heat 
in 2:20%. A week later there was a purse for three- 
year-old pacers at Woodland in which Aerolite, Hy- 
mettus, Josephine and Beulah were entered. Mr. 
Marshall had been implored by several persons not 
to permit Aerolite to lower his record so he scratched 
him and let him step an exhibition mile the next 
day in 2:05% as stated. 

Aerolite is undoubtedly one of the fastest pacers 
ever foaled in California, and one of the best, as he 
never wore anything but a harness and was never 
extended to the limit of his speed at any time. In 
his mile in 2:05% the only time Mr. Sutherland 
spoke to him was within fifty yards of the finish 
when he gave a low "whist," and the colt increased 
his speed until he was going faster than a two- 
minute clip at the finish. Aerolite was in the stud 
as a four-year-old, being bred to a limited number 
of mares, and Mr. Marshall intended to race him 
last year, but changed his mind and the colt did 
nothing. He had not had a harness on since last 
summer, when Mr. Gifford went to Dixon to see him, 
having run in a large paddock during the day and 
occupied a box stall at night, but Mr Marshall put 
the harness on him and brushed him on the county 
road barefooted, Aerolite showing 'that he still 
possesses all his wonderful power and speed. He 
received a kick on the ank'e in the spring of 1905, 
but Mr. Marshall states that he has never taken a 
lame step and two veterinarians have pronounced 
him sound. 

Aerolite is one of the best bred pacers living. He 
is by that great race winning stallion Searchlight 
2:03%, whose abilities and speed are known all over 
the United States. The dam of Aerolite is that won- 
derful broodmare Trix by Nutwood Wilkes, bred by 
Hon. Ben Rush of Suisun. Trix is the dam of Mona 
Wilkes 2:03%, Moortrix (4) 2:07%, Aerolite (3) 
2:13%, Sirius Pointer (2) 2:18, Thelma 2:19% and 
Leota 2:23. Nutwood Wilkes is the sire of Copa 
de Oro 2:01%, John A. McKerron 2:04%, the dams 
of San Francisco 2:07%, Miss Georgie 2:08% and 
others. The second dam pi Aerolite was a mare by 
Director 2:17 that was bred by the late Dr. M. W. 



Hicks and sold by him to Hon. B. F. Rush. The 
third dam was the mare Mischief, registered on page 
453, volume 3 of the American Trotting Register. 
Mischief was bred by T. T. Tinsley of Mahaska 
county, Iowa, who sold her to Dr. Hicks, who brought 
her to California. Mischief was by Young Tuckahoe 
(son of Flaxtail and Fanny Fern) and her dam was 
Lide by Flaxtail, grandam by Peoria Blue Bull, 
great grandam Fanny Fern by Irwin's Blind Tucka- 
hoe. It will be seen that Mischief was inbred 
to Flaxtail and Fanny Fern, the latter a great pro- 
genitor of speed as her blood appears in the pedi- 
grees of such fast ones as Sir Albert S. 2:03%, Gratt 
2:02%, Jim Logan (3) 2:05%, and many others. It 
was this wonderful combination of pacing speed that 
came from Flaxtail and Fanny Fern that united with 
the prepotent blood of such race winning and produc- 
ing sires as Director 2:17, Nutwood Wilkes 2:16% 
and Searchlight 2:03% that made Aerolite the great 
horse he is, for no other three-year-old ever seen in 
California ever paced a mile with the free swing, 
the extreme speed and the ultimate ease with which 
he finished that mile in 2:05% at Woodland. Mr. 
Gifford is to be congratulated on getting what is un- 
doubtedly one of the greatest young stallions in the 
world and Mr. Marshall on breeding such a horse 
and selling him at such a figure. Aerolite should 
do a big business in the stud in Idaho this summer 
and it is Mr. Gifford's intention to have him trained 
again next fall and put in shape to reduce his record 
in 1911. 

o 

FROM FAR NEW ZEALAND. 



Dunedin, New Zealand, Dec. 14, 1909. 

Editor "Breeder and Sportsman" — Dear Sir: — I 
noticed a paragraph in the October 2d issue of your 
valuable paper re trotting in Australia. I wish to 
contradict the statement that Australian Dan Patch's 
2:10 is the fastest mile made south of the equator. 
Ribbonwood, son of the American horse Wildwood, 
went a mile in 2:09 against Fritz and holds the Aus- 
tralian record. Ribbonwood is credited with going 
a trial in 2:05 prior to said match. 

I suppose you hear or see very little about trot- 
ting in New Zealand. The sport here has improved 
out of all knowledge during the last ten years, thanks 
to the importation of American horses — sires I mean. 
Trotting is making such rapid strides that I predict 
it will become more popular than galloping. The 
stakes are rich; last month our New Zealand cup was 
worth £700 ($3500). There were three days racing, 
with eight races each day. No stake was worth 
less than £150 ($750) so you see we are not so 
bad for a young country. The time in the New 
Zealand Cup was 4:39, won pulling Up, by Wi'dwood 
Jr., sired by Wildwood. [Wildwood is a Palo Alto 
bred stallion that died last year the property of J. 
Kerr of Christchurch. The distance of this race 
is two miles. — Ed. B. and S.] 

Will you please inform me where I can get photos 
of Dan Patch 1:55% and other record ho'ders. I 
want them for framing to hang up in my home, as 
my heart and soul are in trotting. Also could you 
inform me what is the best book on shoeing the 
trotter. We admit that we know little about the 
fine points of trotting, and are only too glad to follow 
American ideas. Trusting to see these questions 
answered in your valuable paper, and thanking you 
in anticipation, I remain 

Your truly, WILLIAM DENNIS. 

68 Manor Place, Dunedin. 

[Pictures of Dan Patch, Directum 2:05%, Arion 
2:07%, Crescceus 2:02% and Roy Wilkes 2:06%, can 
be had by writing to Mr. M. W. Savage. International 
Stock Farm, Minneapolis, Michigan, U. S. A., who 
has issued much interesting advertising about them. 
Schrieber, the Philadelphia, Penn., U. S. A., photog- 
rapher has a collection of photographs of all the 
famous record holding trotters and pacers and would 
doubtless send you a catalogue on application. 
There are several books on shoeing the trotter, 
among which Scientific Horseshoeing by Prof. Wil- 
liam Russell is one of the best. It is complete in 
one volume of 288 pages and sells at $4.] 

o 

PRODUCING FOALS AT 26. 

Porterville, Jan. 8, 1910. 
"Breeder and Sportsman": — I saw in a recent issue 
an account of the mares Marguerite and Annie 
Rooney 2:17 meeting with an accident at Sobra Vista 
Farm, where they are owned by Mr. Rudolph Spreck- 
els. I will say I raised both these mares and sold 
them in San Francisco to Mr. Steve Crane of Tur- 
lock. I raced them in their two-year-old forms and 
drove Annie Rooney in 2:23% and Marguerite in 
2:26 as two-year-olds. Their dam is not given in 
the Year Book but her name is Jewel and she was 
sired by Oakland Boy 2:29, her dam by Stockton 
McClellan and her second dam by Langford. This 
is the breeding that was given me as near as I can 
remember. She has had five foals by Strath way and 
all of them could have taken standard records and 
better had they been trained. They had a great turn 
of speed. Besides being the dam of Annie Rooney 
and Marguerite, Jewell is also the dam of a filly 
by Pasha and this filly produced Lindo 2:19% by 
St rath way. Jewell will be 26 years o'd this spring 
and she is as spry as a colt. She has the best set of 
teeth I have seen in an old horse. She will produce 
another colt in the fall. She has had a filly foal each 
year the last two season. Jewel is now the prop- 
erty of Mr. D. B. Moshier of Porterville and is in 
foal to his stallion Avalon, son of Athadon. Her 
last foal is by Avalon and is verv promising. 

Yours very truly, FRANK HAYES. 



A SENSATIONAL ANNOUNCEMENT. 



Mr. Frank J. Kilpatrick of this city and New York 
has concluded to consign the six grandly bred young 
stallions, foals of 1907, that he brought out here 
last summer, to the Pleasanton sale in March. This 
is the greatest piece of news for horse breeders that 
has been published in this State for some time, as 
these royally bred young horses whose blood lines 
are right in the latest fashion, are needed on this 
coast, and there is no doubt but breeders will snap 
them up eagerly at the sale. It was Mr. Kilpat- 
rick's intention to place these young horses in pub- 
lic service in different parts of the State this year, 
and were he not confined to his bed from illness, he 
would have had them placed ere now, but his con- 
tinued indisposition has led him to consign them to 
this sale in the hopes that they will be purchased 
by breeders who will give them the opportunities 
their splendid breeding and individuality deserve. Mr. 
Kilpatrick has been out of his bed but three days 
since he returned from New York two months ago, 
and had he known that his illness would have been 
of such long duration these young stallions would 
have been consigned to the Old Glory Sale which 
opens in New York one week from next Monday, but 
it is now too late to advertise them there and Mr. 
Kilpatrick will give Coast horsemen the opportunity 
to get six splendidly bred young stallions at their 
own price. The names of the six three-year-olds, 
with their breeding, is as follows: 

Oliver Todd, brown colt by the great Todd 2:14% 
(son of Bingen and Nancy Hanks) dam the produc- 
ing mare Olive Brady by Cyclone. 

Gerald Jay, bay colt by Jay Bird, dam by Bourbon 
Wilkes. 

Black Hall, black colt by Ozono (son of Moko) dam 
the great Maggie Yeaser, dam of Walnut Hall 2:08%, 
sire of The Harvester 2:06%. 

Gov. Constantine, bay colt by Constantine 2:12% 
sire of six in 2:10, and grandsire of this season's 
great trotter Paderewski 2:05%) dam the produc- 
ing mare Nevada by Onward. 

Grant Constantine, bay colt by Constantine, dam 
the producing mare Vivacious by Bernal, son of 
Electioneer. 

Moko Hall, brown colt by Walnut Hall 2:08%, sire 
of The Harvester 2:06%, dam by the great sire 
Moko, second dam by Simmons. 

Full descriptions of these colts with their ex- 
tended pedigrees and photographs will be published 
as soon as the photographs can be taken. Each 
and everyone of them is well enough bred to be 
placed at the head of a breeding farm of high c'.ass 

mares. o 

HAVE LEASED KINNEY LOU 2:073^. 



Ray Mead, manager of the new San Jose race 
track, and his brother-in-law Dr. J. P. Nichols, the 
well known veterinarian of Salinas, concluded nego- 
tiations with the famous reinsman Budd Doble this 
week, by which they have leased that great McKin- 
ney trotting stallion Kinney Lou 2:07%, for two 
years, and will place him in the stud at the San Jose 
track during that time at a fee of $75. Several par- 
ties have tried to lease this horse to take him east, 
but Messrs. Mead and Nichols were the lucky ones 
to get him. 

Kinney Lou 2:07% is the fastest trotting son of 
McKinney on this coast, in fact Sterling MeKinney 
2:06% is the only stallion by McKinney that has a 
faster trotting record. Both Mr. Mead and Dr. 
Nichols have bred mares to Kinney Lou in the past 
and now own colts by him which they value very 
highly. The speed shown by Kinney de Lopez, Dia- 
mond Mac and other of Kinney Lou's get now in 
training at San Jose is another thing that induced 
these gentlemen to secure a lease on him, as they 
are both confident his fame as a sire will be very 
great within another year. He is already the sire 
of several standard trotters and pacers, and his get 
are noted for the beauty of their conformation, their 
great natural speed and their good legs and feet. We 
congratulate Mr. Mead and Dr. Nichols on their 
getting Kinney Lou and are confident they will do 
a good business with him. With him and Bon Voy- 
age 2:12% in the stud at the San Jose track, the 
breeders of the Santa Clara valley will have within 
easy reach two representatives of the Wilkes and 
Electioneer families, respectively, that are the equals 
of any stallions in America. 

o 

RIVERSIDE DRIVING CLUB ELECTS OFFICERS. 



A meeting of the Riverside Driving Club was held 
in that city on Friday evening, January 7th, at which 
officers and directors were elected for the ensuing 
year as follows: 

President, J. F. Backstrand; Vice-President, H. P. 
Zimmerman: Treasurer, Herman G. Stanley; Secre- 
tary, F. S. Pond; Directors, J. T. Garner, J. C. Stan- 
ley, G. M. Carrigan, H. Eigenbrod, Axel Nelson, O. E. 
Holland, G. H. Judd, and T. I. Fletcher. 

J. T. Garner was tendered a vote of thanks for his 
services as secretary the past year, as well as one 
to Stewart & Carrigan for the u;e of their office 
for a meeting place. 

J. F. Backstrand presented the project of a county 
fair, which has been considered by the Business 
Men's Association and chamber of commerce, and 
the proposition was indorsed. 

It was announced that the track had been leased 
for another year from the owner, Mr. L. Fotter. 

The next race meeting of the club will be held at 
San Bernardino track on the 22d of February. The 
members are all confident of a good season of sport 
during 1910. 



Saturday, January 22, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



6 



FROM THE SACRAMENTO TRACK. 

Our track is great. Every trainer who takes time 
to visit it immediately makes up his mind that it 
is a winter track par excellence. Al McDonald has 
located here with eight head of trotters and pacers 
from Portland, Oregon, and is well pleased with the 
surroundings. 

John Quinn stepped one of Mr. Todhunter's two- 
year-olds an eighth in 18 seconds here last Satur- 
day. 

Chas. Silva has started jogging Natoma, his son of 
Zolock 2:05%, and it looks as though it would take 
the best on the Coast to trim him. Teddy Bear is 
jogging and is about the handsomest horse anyone 
ever saw. 

There are nine trainers here now and things are 
taking on a look of old times these sunshiny days. 
John Silva had the misfortune to have his Silver 
Bow mare slip her foal by Natoma. He is very 
much broken up over losing this colt as he con- 
siders her the best mare he owns and as Natoma has 
shown all the gameness and speed that it takes to 
make a first class sire, he expected something extra 
good. 

Mr. Metz, the harnessmaker, has started jogging 
his colts and they look extra good. In fact the 
horses up here now are all good looking and well 
bred. Our horsemen will not waste time on others. 

The horse interests are surely reviving. The Sac- 
ramento Driving Club will be at it strong as soon as 
spring opens and have more good matinees than 
ever. CAPITALION. 

January 18, 1910. 

o 

A GAITED HORSE FUTURITY. 



The Pacific Coast Gaited Saddle Horse Associa- 
tion, of which E. A. Bridgeford of San Francisco 
is president, and W. A. Hunter of Sacramento is 
secretary, has opened a futurity for gaited three-year- 
olds. All mares that were bred to registered saddle 
stallions in 1909 are eligible to nomination in this 
stake February 1st, 1910; $2 must accompany entry. 
$5 must be paid on July 1st, 1910, $5 on November 
1st, 1910, $10 on May 1st, 1911, $10 on May 1st, 1912, 
and $10 on May 1st, 1913. A starting payment of $10 
must be paid three days before the show. Colts 
must show five gaits when three years old under 
American Saddle Horse Association rules. Show to 
be held on grounds of the association offering most 
added money to the purse. Money to be divided 50, 
25, 15 and 10 per cent. We believe this is the first 
futurity ever offered for saddle horses. 

The association has also opened a stake for five- 
gaited horses of any age to be decided this year. 
Any horse showing five gaits is eligible. Entries 
close June 1st, when $5 must be paid. Horses are 
to be named July 1st, 1910, and a starting payment 
of $10 made three days before the show. Entries 
are open to the world. Breeding not considered. 
All other points to be governed by American Saddle 
Horse Association rules. 

For any further information and entry blanks 
write to W. A. Hunter, Secretary, P. O. Box 467, Sac- 
ramento, California. 



DEMONIO 2:111/4 IN THE STUD. 



Rush & Haile, proprietors of the Suisun Stock 
Farm, announce that Demonio's fee this year will 
be $40 for a limited number of outside mares. There 
is not a stallion in California that can be bred 
to with greater certainty of getting a good looking 
roadster or a fast money winning race horse. De- 
monio is a son of that great speed sire Chas. Derby 
and a full brother to Diablo 2:09%, Don Derby 2:04 y 2 , 
Derbertha 2:07% and others. He has never been 
mated with a very large number of mares any season, 
but his get are seen at the races c: ery year and bring 
home the money. His daughter Mona Wilkes 2:03% 
was one of the gamest and fastest pacers ever seen 
on a California track, Memonio 2:09% was another, 
and Demonio Wilkes 2:09% has the distinction of 
starting in four races in one week and winning the 
last one in faster time than 2:10. The two-year-old 
winner of the Pacific Breeders' Futurity in 1909 was 
a daughter of Demonio, the handsome r.nd fast 
Normono 2:14%. Demonio's blood is breeding on as 
his son Father McKinnon is the sire of that game 
pacer Solano Boy 2:07%. Demonio was by a great 
sire, and his dam is the greaest speed producing 
broodmare in the world — Bertha, dam of four with 
records below 2:10, and two more that have trialed 
below that mark. Such breeding in a stallion can 
be depended upon to produce from mares of any 
merit. The fee of $40 asked for his services is 
surprisingly low considering his qualifications. 

o 

ANSWERS TO CORESPONDENTS. 

W. G. D., Los Angeles. — Martha Wilkes 2:08 is 
registered on page 303, Vol. 6 American Trotting Reg- 
ister. She is by Alcyone 2:27, dam Ella by Clark 
Chief 89, second dam Molly Robinson by Pilot 
Walker, third dam by Copperhead, son of Tom Hal. 
Ella is also the dam of Prince Egbert 2: 29 %, and the 
grandam of Effle G. 2:19%, Ernest B. 2:29%, Billy 
Wilkes 2:29% and the pacer Ragland 2:21%. 
i o 

Glenworth Farm is a new trotting horse breeding 
farm in Delaware. Among the mares there is the 
California bred five-year-old Gertrude Dillon, bred at 
Santa Rosa Stock Farm. She was worked a little 
last year as a four-year-old and could beat 2:15. 
They think she will trot in 2:10 this year. She Is by 
Sidney Dillon out of Biscari, dam of six, by Director. 



GUY McKINNEY 37625. 

There is no stallion in California that carries more 
of the champion race horse blood of George Wilkes 
than does Guy McKinney 37625. His sire is McKin- 
ney, the greatest grandson of George Wilkes; his 
dam is by Guy Wilkes, one of the greatest sons of 
George Wilkes. His grandam is by Onward, another 
of the great sons of George Wilkes. Of his sire, Mc- 
Kinney 2:11%, little need be said as he is known 
to every breeder in America as one of the greatest 
horses that ever lived. The dam of Guy McKinney 
is Flossie Drais, a daughter of Guy Wilkes 2:15%, 
the stallion that once headed the San Mateo Stock 
Farm and whose get went through the grand circuit 
and led the money winners for years; the second 
dam, Blanche Ward, dam of China Maid 2:04% by the 
mighty Onward 2:25, another great son of George 
Wilkes. The blood of Onward is highly prized by 
intelligent breeders. The third dam of Guy McKinn- 
ney is Blanche Patchen, a daughter of Mambrino 
Patchen, the great broodmare sire. The fourth dam 
was Lady Blanche, another great broodmare, and his 
next dam was the mare Lady Weiner by Saltran that 
sired Highland Maid 2:27, holder of the world's 
record in 1853. From this it will be seen that Guy 
McKinney's breeding is along the lines of great speed 
and race winning capabilities, and mated with well 
bred mares of good individuality, it is as logical to 
presume that he will be a successful sire as it is 
certain that night follows day. 

Guy McKinney stands 16 hands, weighs 1200 
pounds and is a fine individual in every respect. He 
has been unfortunate as he has lacked opportunity, 
having only been bred to half a dozen registered 
mares in the last four years, but notwithstanding, 
is the first son of McKinney to sire a colt whose get 
has won a heat in standard time. His son McAdrian, 
out of a mare by Adrian, took a race record of 2:24 
at Tulare last year, and at Fresno, October 20th, the 
two-year-old Trix McAdrian by McAdrian paced a 
public mile in 2:23%. Neither McAdrian nor Trix 
were ever handled previous to the opening of the 
Stockton track on June 20th. Dr. Thompson of Oak- 
dale has a three-year-old that paced a mile in 2:14 
on the Stockton track last fall and did it handily 
with three months' training. M. A. Lewis, of Oak- 
dale, the owner of Guy McKinney, will make a sea- 
son with him this year at Oakdale and should re- 
ceive a liberal patronage. * 

o 

THOSE WASHINGTON McKINNEYS. 



We don't believe there was ever a stallion that had 
five new standard performers placed to his credit 
in January before this feat was accomplished at 
San Jose on the 6th instant. When eight of the get 
of Washington McKinney entered the standard list in 
one day at Santa Rosa in 1908, and on the same clay 
another of his get beat 2:10 in a heat she lost, it was 
a world's record, and now as early as January 6th, 
after six weeks of rainy weather when workouts 
were out of the question, Washington McKinney has 
five of his get take standard records in one after- 
noon — and not one of them ever saw a race track 
until late last summer. Isn't this another world's 
record and isn't Washington McKinney a wonder- 
ful sire. Just stop for a moment and consider where 
you can pick up a bunch of a dozen horses by one 
sire that after two or three months' handling during 
which not over six weeks' actual training is given 
them, can trot fast enough for five of them to take 
standard records while four others beat 2:50. And 
all on the same day over a new track that was not 
finished or considered fast -by several seconds. We 
say it is wonderful and the horse that can sire such 
horses is certainly a great sire of speed. 

o 

CENTURY SIRES. 

The list of stallions that have one hundred or more 
standard performers to their credit is given herewith, 
arranged according to their standing with regard 
to total number of representatives at both gaits: 
Gambetta Wilkes 2:19% by George Wilkes 2:22.. 210 



Allerton 2:09% by Jay Bird 5060 202 

Onward 2:25% by George Wilkes 2:22 200 

Red Wilkes 1749 by George Wilkes 2:22 178 

Nutwood 2:18% by Belmont 64 174 

Alcantara 2:23 by George Wilkes 2:22 170 

Electioneer 125 by Hambletonian 10 160 

Baron Wilkes 2:18 by George Wilkes 2:22 142 

Ashland Wilkes 2:17% by Red Wilkes 1749 139 

Wilton 2:19% by George Wilkes 2:22 137 

Simmons 2:28 by George Wilkes 2:22 137 

Sphinx 2:20% by Electioneer 125 135 

Jay Bird 5060 by George Wilkes 2:22 131 

Axtell 2:12 by William L. 4244 129 

Pilot Medium 1597 by Happy Medium 400 127 

McKinney 2:11% by Alcyone 2:27 121 

Chimes 5948 by Electioneer 125 121 

Prodigal 2:16 by Pancoast 2.21% 120 

Elyria 2:25% by Mambrino King 1279 117 

Norval 2:14% by Santa Claus 2:17% 113 

Robt. McGregor 2:17% by Major Edsall 2:29 111 

Wilkes Hoy 2:24% by George Wilkes 2:22 106 

Bobby Burns 2:19% by Gen. Wilkes 2:21% 100 

o 

NOItTII MONTI'F.LIKK. Vt. 



Troy Chemical Co., Hlnghamton, N. Y. : 

Oentlemen: I raced thin mare during treatment for 
a very had tendon. She wan so lame that she could 
hardly hear her weight on It. In two weeks from the 
time I commenced to use "Save-the-Horse" she was 
going sound. I have worked her hard all summer and 
she Is sound on the tendon as any horse could be. 

I have used It a great deal, and think It Is the 
greatest medicine ever put up for had tendon and 
strains of all kinds. Yours truly, F. S. LITTLE. 



GAMENESS. 



No horse is truly entitled to be called game unless 
he or she has demonstrated the quality in contests 
against horses whose speed capacity and racing class 
equals his own, writes "Marque" in the Horse Re- 
view. How often have we seen the horse that 
everyone pronounced downright game "crack" when 
asked to hook up with another that he quickly found 
that he could not handle and just as quickly passed 
the struggle up. I have seen the reputations of 
many steeds shattered in a single heat, and I have 
witnessed many "phenoms" explode when asked the 
real question against horses that had a little some- 
thing "on" them. A great many horses, too, become 
discouraged when once soundly beaten and their 
worth as racing tools from that time on is sadly dis- 
counted. One of the few that never seemed to recog- 
nize defeat was old Joe Patchen 2.01%, who, by his 
repeated demonstrations of gameness, and be- 
cause of having outclassed his famous coterie 
of opponents, earned the title of "iron horse." De- 
feat seemed to mean nothing to old Joe; he just 
smiled, "as it were," and came back to try again and 
again. 

The horses that die on a trot are the ones that the 
critics are wont to make the objects of their keen- 
est darts, but, personally, I must confess that I would 
rather see a trotter or pacer stick to their stride 
and die away than see them break under stress of 
a hard drive in the stretch. To my mind the steady 
horse that tries till his power is one and his strength 
exhausted, is preferable to one that, when defeat is 
apparent, resorts to the cowardly expedient of run- 
ning out. Both admit defeat, the steady horse sim- 
ply saying he has had enough and the other sort 
tearing out the door and running down the alley — 
which would you prefer, if the struggle was between 
human adversaries? 

Gameness is not to be detected by mere outward 
signs, although many horsemen stick to the old the- 
ory that a game horse always has a stiff croup and 
carries his tail tightly between his buttocks. "Look 
out for one that carries his tail high," they will tell 
you, "such horses are always quitters." But the 
sign, as do all others, fails as often as it holds 
good. We have had many sterling race horses that 
carried their tails high, but I need only mention the 
champion racing gelding Uhlan 2:02% as an exam- 
ple. In 1908, when he appeared as a four-year-old, 
I often heard the remark passed that he "wouldn't 
do" because he carried his tail like a waving plume. 
But they had to take it back when Uhlan proved 
the greatest of all unsexed trotters. 

o 

HARRISON CHIEF 3841. 



One of the double registered horses found in both 
the American Trotting Register and the Saddle 
Horse Register is Harrison Chief, number in the 
Saddle Register 1606, in the Standardbred Register 
3841. The similarity in the main of his breeding 
with that of Mambrino King 1279, for many years 
iheralded far and wide as "the handsomest horse in 
the world" strikes one on first glance. Harrison 
Chief was sired by Clark Chief 89, a well pedigreed 
son of Mambrino Chief 11, whose dam was largely 
thoroughbred out of a daughter of Joe Downing 710 
by Edwin Forest 49. Next dams running bred. 
Mambrino King was sired by Mambrino Patchen 58, 
a different son of Mambrino Chief II, whose dam 
was almost full thoroughbred, and the dam of Mam- 
brino King was directly by Edwin Forest 49; next 
dam quite nearly thoroughbred. The close resem- 
blance in blood lines, with the top crosses the same 
on both sire and dam's side, causes one to stop and 
reflect and seek for some similarity in the two 
horses and their progeny and history. And some 
things at least were in common, and those were the 
attribute of size, general conformation, action and 
style. Mambrino King was a chestnut, while Har- 
rison Chief was a rich bay in color, and Mambrino 
King was a prepotent speed sire and progenitor, 
with near eighty in the list, with nine in 2:05% to 
2:10, thirty-five speed siring sons and dams of close 
to one hundred and fifty in the list, with twelve in 
2:03% to 2:10, while Harrison Chief had but three 
trotters in 2:26% to 2:30, and the dams of eleven, 
two in 2:10— Will Kerr (p) 2:07% and J. H. L. (p) 
2:08%. Both have contributed highly prized style 
and quality to their descendants and the families In 
which employed. Edwin Forest 49 was a fountain 
in this direction which has enriched the American 
horse immensely, and through his daughters these 
two horses are improving the harness speed and 
the saddle tribes. Bourbon Chief 979, by Harrison 
Chief 1606, from a Denmark mare, has become noted 
as an author and propagator of high-class saddle-bred 
performers and producers. The value in saddle lines 
was doubtless more owing to the Edwin Forest 49 
strain than that of Mambrino Chief 11, as the latter 
appeared better adapted to use in the harness speed 
class. But there is a certain commoness of origin 
and blending of the two breeds that makes them dis- 
tinctly an American horse. — Spirit of the West. 
o 

In a dispatch to the daily press from Albany, N. Y., 
dated January 7th, Attorney General O'Malley ren- 
dered an opinion to State Comptroller Clark Williams 
that moneys received from entries to trotting and 
running races constitute a portion of the gross re- 
ceipts of a race meeting, and therefore come within 
the meaning of the statute which provides that 5 per 
cent of the gross receipts of every meeting shall be 
paid to the State. 



Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1910. 



NOTES AND NEWS 



Aerolite (3) 2:11% has been sold. 



The price at which he changed hands is $8000. 



Mr. C. L. Gifford, of Lewiston, Idaho, is the new 
owner. 



The Angeius by Zombro is now in the stable of 
Frank Colby, of Romeo, Michigan. 



The horses belonging to the late Frank Jeremyn 
have been consigned to the Chicago sale. 



Mr. Hi K. Devereux, of Cleveland, has been elected 
president of the Grand Circuit. Geo. Dietrick, also 
of Cleveland, is secretary. 



John Caldwell 2:08% goes to the big sale to be 
held at Chicago February 21st to 26th by the Chi- 
cago Horse Sale Company. 



Mrs. Julia Snyder of Bakersfield has recently pur- 
chased a fine Ally by Sadie Moor 39989. that gives 
every promise of being a fast trotter. 



"Silver Hill" Riley is living in Chicago this win- 
ter and his health is good, which will be good 
news to his many California friends. 



Dick McMahon, the well known trainer and driver, 
was married on January 12th to Miss Emma Hecht, 
a charming young lady of Libertyville, Illinois. 



Mr. F. J. Kilpatrick has consigned his six eastern 
bred young three-year-old stallions to the Pleasanton 
sale. This is the greatest opportunity breeders have 
had offered them lately. 



Byron Jennings, who owns the race track at 
Visalia is planning to give a mixed meeting there 
in the spring, during which there will be purse races 
for trotters, pacers and runners. 



Next Monday and Tuesday are the dates for the 
sales of Shorthorns from the famous Glide and 
Howard herds. The sales will be held at Chase's 
Pavilion, 478 Valencia street. San Francisco. 



Detroit will likely give a $3000 purse for 2:09 
pacers. This will help take care of the holdovers 
for the C. of C, also those slow-record pacers with the 
hopples that cannot get into the new class. 



McKinney has another speed siring grandson in 
Coralene, a six-year-old son of Del Coronado 2:09%. 
Coralene is the sire of Anna Coralene (3) 2:28%. 
There are not many horses that have been producing 
sires at six years. 



W. T. McBride of Pleasanton has sold to James 
Teagarden the mare Helen Kelly by Bonnie McK. 
(son of McKinney and Bonsilene 2:14% by Stam- 
boul), dam Birdie by Jay Bird. The price paid was 
$200. Helen Kelly was bred to Aerolite (3) 2:11% 
last year and is heavy in foal. 



Geo. T. Beckers has a few broodmares and young 
Zombros that he wants to sell before he ships his 
great stallion east again in the spring. He wants to 
sell everything but Zombro as the horse will take 
all his time. Those wanting a few extra well bred 
youngsters by the greatest speed sire of the year 
had better write Beckers about them. 



Members of the San Diego Horsemen's Associa- 
tion are arranging an afternoon of sport for Wash- 
ington's Birthday. Several races will be held, all to 
be best two heats in three. This will be the first 
racing held at the Sweetwater track in several 
months. 



William G. Layng has recently gotten up and had 
printed a catalogue of the trotting stock on the Hop- 
land Stock Farm, Hopland, California, that are 
offered for sale. There are eighteen head of which 
full pedigrees are given, and there are some ele- 
gantly bred horses among them. These horses will 
all be priced to anyone wishing to buy. 



According to the Goshen, N. Y., Democrat, Mrs. E. 
H. Harriman is going to continue the support of the 
trotting interests at the Goshen track, which were 
formerly shared by the late Mr. Harriman. Mrs. 
Harriman has been interested in the trotting horse 
for some time, and with her own hands planted a 
vine on the grave of Stamboul, that she brought all 
the way from the former champion stallion's native 
State, California. 



• W. B. Connelly, of Suisun, is the owner of a very 
handsome black yearling colt by Gen. J. B. Frisbie, 
out of a Demonio mare that is a square trotter and 
very promising. The dam of this colt was raised by 
Rush & Haile, and the appearance of this colt 
prompted them to secure Gen. Frisbie, who is a full 
brother to the good McKinney trotter Tom Smith 
2:13%, to use on their farm this year. They will 
breed him to a number of their choice Demonio 
fillies. » 



The trotter Paderewski, 2:05% it is said, will get 
part of his winter training pulling his owner over 
the roads of Illinois after cattle and hogs. 



Among the pacers to join the 2:05 list the past 
season, are George Gano 2:03%, Giftline 2:03%, Hal 
Raven 2:03%, Major Mallow 2:04%, Dan S. 2:04%, 
Star Patchen 2:04% and Ross K. 2:04%. 



Badge 2:06%, the pacing gelding that a dozen 
years ago was prominent on the Western tracks, 
died a few weeks ago at the Easton Farm, near 
Rochester, Minn., where he had been owned since 
his retirement. 



The consignment which the famous Walnut Hall 
Farm has made to the Midwinter Sale at New York 
comprises 44 head of as grandly bred youngsters 
as ever went to a sale. They are sired by Walnut 
Hall, Moko and Ozono. 



The black trotting mare Episode 2:18, by Ambas- 
sador 2:21%, dam Santos (dam of Peter the Great 
2:07%) by Grand Sentinel, is owned at the Her- 
bert Stock Farm, Denver, Colo., and is a regular 
breeder. Episode is dam of Mr. Pinkerton (sire 
of Peter the Second 2:17%) the first speed-siring 
son of Peter the Great. 



Del Coronado 2:09% has been chosen to repre- 
sent the type of the American trotter at the stock 
breeders' show held by the veterinary department 
of the University of Pensylvania. No higher type 
of the trotting horse could be found than this son 
of McKinney. 



A race meeting over the Ottawa, Ontario, ice track, 
will open on Saturday next, and the list of entries 
is very large, averaging over 20 to each race. There 
are seven races each for a purse of $1000. The five 
mile race for trotters and pacers has no less than 
fourteen entries, a very large number for a race at 
that distance. 



Chas. Marley of Woodland has registered his hand- 
some young stallion Sir Poleon in Vol. 19 of the 
American Trotting Register under rule 1, with the 
number 52,065. Mr. Marley will only breed him to 
four or five mares this season, but will advertise 
him for public service next year. 



Superintendent Hrinton of the Woodland Hackney 
Stud, is preparing a carload of horses to take to 
the Portland Spring Sale. The consignment from 
this farm to the last Portland sale sold fairly well 
and the majority of them that changed hands after- 
wards brought greatly increased prices. 



O. H. Whitehouse of Woodland has placed his five- 
year-old black gelding Banker G. by Greco B. in 
Det Bigelow's hands to train. He is a fast stepper. 
Mr. Whitehouse also owns a full sister to this horse 
called Cashier G. that he intends breeding to some 
good stallion in the spring. The dam of these two 
is the fast pacing mare Banker's Daughter 2:13% by 
Arthur Wilkes. 



Charles Johnson of Woodland has registered his 
young stallion by Demonio 2:11%, dam Potrero Girl 
by Prince Airlie, as Airlie Demonio. This colt was 
foaled in 1908 and Mr. Johnson has just had him 
nicely broken and has driven him a mile in 2:44 
pacing. He expects he will develop into a good race 
horse. Airlie Demonio will be permitted to serve 
ten mares this year, the most of them already en- 
gaged. 



Having rounded out 25 years of service in the 
fire department of Brookline, Mass., Dick, a hand- 
some white horse, was retired with honors and a 
pension on Christmas Day, which also marked his 
30th birthday. His retirement was ordered not be- 
cause of any infirmity, for he is still sound and met- 
tlesome, but because he had earned a rest and also 
because the fire chief has decided to ride to fires 
for a time in an automobile. Dick's pension is a 
guarantee for life of a soft litter, needful exercise 
and three square meals a day. — Horse World. 

Dr. Nash, of San Jose, has sent his good pacer 
Happy Dentist 2:11% to Pleasanton to be trained 
for his 1910 campaign by Henry Helman, and he will 
be another 2:10 performer to add to Helman's long 
and rapidly growing list. Helman also received 
last week from Robert Garside of Salinas the seven- 
year-old McKinney mare Dora McKinny, that is an- 
other Sweet Marie in looks and conformation and 
one of the choicest bred McKinneys left in the State. 
Her first dam is by Nutwood Wilkes, second by Al- 
toona, third by Junio, fourth by Carr's Mambrino, 
and fifth a thoroughbred. Henry M. Ayer of San 
Jose has sent three head to Helman. They are all 
highly bred. One is a three-year-old filly by Del 
Coronado 2:09%, dam by Owyhee 2:11, second dam 
by Wilton 2:19%, another is a black two-year-old 
filly by Alconda Jay, dam by Chas. Derby, second 
dam by Wilton, and the other is a bay two-year-old 
colt by Baron Bowles 2:25, dam the Owyhee mare 
that is dam of the three-year-old. The Pleasanton 
track is in fine shape and open for business every day 
in the week. 



Lou Mativia, whose string of horses is at the 
Dixon half-mile track, desires to contradict the rumor 
that has been published to the effect that he is 



going to quit the training game. "I shall still con- 
tinue to break and drive a few good ones," said he 
to a "Breeder and Sportsman" representative last 
Monday. Mativia has seven head at present, among 
them the three-year-old Alba by Altamont, dam Babe 
by James Madison, second dam by Dexter Prince, 
a two-year-old colt by Nutwood Wilkes, dam by 
Demonio, that is a very fast pacer, T. C. Horigan's 
two-year-old filly by Palite, dam by Demonio, 
second dam by Bradtmoor, Dr. Hall's two-year-old 
bay mare by Palite that he is just breaking, and last 
but not least Mativia's own stallion Alton 2:11 that 
is in fine shape. In fact all these horses look as if 
they were receiving the best of care. 



President George L. Warlow of the Fresno 
County Fair Association has submitted an offer to the 
Board of Supervisors of that county to buy the 
Fresno racetrack property, now owned by the 
county, for $34,000 and to enter into a bond that if 
the property is deeded to trustees in the name of 
an association it shall never be used for speculative 
purposes by diverting the object of the association, 
cutting up the tract into lots or selling them for 
profit. The last County Fair held at Fresno was a 
success, and it is the purpose of Mr. Warlow and 
his associates to make the fair and harness races 
an annual event, and to this end they propose to 
spend a large sum in improving the property, but 
desire to acquire title to the grounds before spend- 
ing this money. The matter will come before the 
board next week. 



The recent death of the great stallion Chimes 
renders it of timely interest to know of the where- 
abouts of his fastest daughter, the famous mare 
Fantasy 2:06. the first three-year-old trotter to take 
a record below 2:10. Fantasy is now at the Wilton 
Stock Farm of Henry A. Brehm, at Havre de Grace, 
Md.. and is believed to be surely in foal to Alliewood 
2:09%, premier stallion at that model farm. She 
was bred on March 17, 1908, and therefore due to 
foal next month. It would be unique if she should 
foal on February 22, Washington's Birthday, and 
Mr. Brehm writes that if she should do so, "and it 
should prove a filly, he would name it Martha St. 
Patrick. See the idea? Mare served on St. Patrick's 
Day; foal delivered on Washington's Birthday. Fan- 
tasy is very heavy and it is to be hoped that there 
will be no mishap, for the foal will be exceedingly 
valuable, as it will combine the golden Wilkes- 
Electioneer cross. — Trotter and Pacer. 



There will be buyers from all over the coast at 
the Pleasanton sale in March. The consignment 
of the six young stalions by Mr. F. J. Kilpatrick will 
bring buyers from the far north and from the south, 
and as far east as Idaho. This will be the first 
opportunity Pacific Coast breeders have had to get 
young stallions by such sires as Todd 2:14%, Walnut 
Hall 2:08%, Jay Bird. Constantine 2:12% and that 
wonderfully bred young sire Ozono 40,480. This last 
named stallion is only eight years old. He is by 
Moko out of Ozama, dam of Ozanam 2:07, Kinley 
Mack 2:14%, and Ozalma (3) 2:20%, by Director 
2:17, second dam Mary Sprague by Gov. Sprague, 
sire of McKinnney's dam. Black Hall, the three- 
year-old son of Ozono that is to be sold at this sale 
is out of Maggie Yeager, the dam of Walnut Hall 
2:08%, sire of The Harvester 2:09%. A daughter 
of Maggie Yeager produced Hedgewood Boy 2:02% 
and Lady Maud C. 2:02%. Black Hall is beyond all 
question one of the very best bred young stallions in 
America, in fact no better bred horse lives today. 



Al McDonald was in this city for a day or two 
this week. He recently shipped his string of eight 
horses from Portland, Oregon, to the California 
State Fair track at Sacramento, and will train them 
there during the next few months. He says there 
is a little too much moisture, frozen and otherwise 
at the Portland track just now, and thinks he caD 
make more speed progress over Sacramento's ex- 
cellent winter track. His string consists of the 
Crescius four-year-old stallion Frank D. Nicoll, 
owned by Geo. H. Fox of Cements, a filly by Zolock 
owned by G. A. Westgate. of Portland that is a 
very promising two-year-old, a four-year-old Prodigal 
gelding that is also a fine prospect and is owned by 
Samuel Elmore of Astoria. Oregon, two Zolock colts 
belonging to H. Becker of Portland, a colt by Direct- 
well out of a Silver Bow mare owned by Banker 
Myer of Portland, the pacer Manuel by Nutwood 
Wilkes, and a gelding by Zombro owned by Mr. 
Phelps of Portland. 



The statement first printed by the Kentucky Stock 
Farm, and widely copied by the trotting turf press, 
which gave Moy 2:07% as one of the mares burned 
in the big fire at Patchen Wilkes Farm, near Lex- 
ington, on December 29th, turns out to be an error. 
Moy was not in Kentucky at the time, but was here 
in California and was shipped east on Friday of 
last week, along with The Lord Dillon and By Mack, 
the stallions that Mr. Frank Kilpatrick purchased 
for Mr. W. E. D. Stokes, proprietor of Patchen 
Wilkes Farm. Every horseman will be pleased to 
know that Moy 2:07% was not in the fire, as this 
daughter of Prodigal is to be bred to Peter the Great 
2:07% and is expected to be a producer of speed 
from the first. Her breeding, conformation and dis- 
position are such that she should be a very great 
broodmare, and Mr. Stokes has certainly obtained a 
prize in her. 



Saturday, January 22, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE SAN JOSE TRACK. 



San Jose, Cal., Jan. 19, 1910. 

Breeder and Sportsman: I have heard that it has 
been quite widely reported that the new track has 
suffered a great deal of damage from the recent rains 
and that a great many stalls were flooded, necessi- 
tating the moving of the horses occupying them to 
stables outside the track grounds. I have also re- 
ceived a number of letters from parties in different 
parts of the State asking me to inform them of the 
true condition of the track and whether or not it 
is really a good wet weather training track. 

As the recent "flood" caused me more trouble 
than anyone else located here I decided to give all 
those interested in this track the true facts in the 
case through the columns of the "Breeder and Sports- 
man," and also my opinion of it as a winter training 
track. The heavy rain of December 30-31 came be- 
fore Mr. Mead had completed the drainage intended 
to take care of the water that might accumulate in 
the vicinity of the stalls that I occupy which are 
built on lower ground than any of the others. The 
result was that I had to move five horses to a barn 
on the place Mr. Frank Burke recently purchased 
adjoining the driving park, and keep them there a 
few days until Mr. Mead made their stalls habitable 
again by hauling in some dry dirt for the floors. 
That was the extent of the "flood." The drainage 
now completed is sufficient to take care of all the 
water that may fall during the hardest storm, and 
there is not a stall on the place that is in the 
slightest danger of even getting damp, no matter 
how hard or how long it may rain. 

In regard to the damage to the track itself caused 
by "washout" as reported, one wheelbarrow load 
of dirt was all that was necessary to repair the 
injury. Mr. Mead brought suit against the owner 
of an adjoining field for obstructing the natural 
water course by which the lower end of the infield 
is drained through a sewer under the track at the 
head of the stretch. When this party consulted his 
lawyer he made up his mind that the race track 
water would not hurt his ditch at all and the case 
has been compromised and settled out of court, and 
all the water that falls on the grounds of the San 
Jose Driving Park or finds its way there in any 
other manner will have clear sailing and there will 
be no more "floods." 

In regard to the track as a wet weather training 
track, considering the newness of the track and its 
unsettled and unfinished condition it is simply won- 
derful and I believe there is not a trainer now 
located there but will agree with me and say that he 
never saw anything like it. It rained so hard last 
Friday, Saturday and Sunday that during those 
three days there were not more than half a dozen 
horses jogged, but on Monday everybody was jog- 
ging on the track and with the exception of about 
fifty yards that had been covered with fresh dirt 
the day before the storm commenced the footing 
was solid and good, and in the afternoon some of 
the horses were given fast work. 

That it will make a lightning fast and absolutely 
safe track for summer use is the opinion of everyone 
located here. I believe it will be the best track 
to develop speed on ever built in California. 

Mr. Mead has nearly completed six fine paddocks, 
75x100 feet with a close board fence 8 feet high 
with rolling gates, and also the finest breeding 
paddock I have ever seen on any race track or 
stock farm. It is 40x75 feet with a large shed en- 
closed on three sides, which will provide shelter 
in bad weather and dry grounds at all times. The 
fence to this paddock is 9 feet high. 

There is much more that I could say in favor of 
this plant as it now is and as it will be before an- 
other year, but I have already made this letter of 
greater length than I intended. Hoping our friends 
will not worry about our being "drowned out" any 
more, I will close. 

C. C. CRIPPEN. 

o 

DEATH OF ALDINE 2: 19'/^. 



Aldine 2:19%, the famous old pole mate of Maud S., 
2:08%, died on December 19th at Hyde Park-on-the- 
Hudson, N. Y., of old age. Aldine was a brown mare 
foaled in 1873 by Almont, dam Mother Hubbard, by 
Johnston's Toronto, and made her record at Hart- 
ford, Conn., August 31, 1882. She was therefore over 
thirty-six years old. She was a fair campaigner but 
her principal claim to fame was as pole mate to Maud 
S., when in one memorable instance the pair trotted 
a most remarkable mile at Fleetwood Park, New 
York. 

On June 15, 1883, William H. Vanderbilt drove Maud 
S. and Aldine to an ordinary road wagon in 2 : 1 5 ■ 
The wagon and pole weighed 211 pounds. Mr. Van- 
derbilt weighed 200 pounds. There had been no elabo- 
rate training. There was no star professional driving 
and no skeleton wagon. Mr. Vanderbilt drove them 
from his town stables up to Fleetwood Park, just as he 
would on any fine day and it was the fourth time they 
had even been driven together. He gave them a pre- 
liminary mile in 2:24%. A little later he came out 
for a faster mile. He started near the three-quarter 
pole and was going free and strong in the center of 
the track when he got the word. The first turn was 
passed in splendid shape and they shot by the quar- 
ter in 32% seconds and they went down the hill in 
splendid style, getting to the three-quarters in 1:41 
and came home in 2:\5Y 2 . Neither mare made a 
skip in the mile and Aldine deserved as much honor 
as Maud S. 



FARMERS AS HORSE BREEDERS. 



A discussion has been going on recently in some 
Eastern papers as to which breed of horses would 
pay the New York and Eastern farmer the best to 
raise. F. M. Ware, the manager of the American 
Horse Exchange, New York City, is not only a thor- 
ough horseman, bat in his position as manager of 
that great all the year round horse mart, he is able 
to speak with authority of the Eastern market and 
in addition he is a writer on the horse of established 
reputation, has contributed a very interesting article 
to the controversy. 

Having stated that if a fanner decided to breed 
heavy draft horses he believed that Percherons and 
Belgians were the best because the average buyer 
knows all about them and they have won their way 
by sheer force of merit. He goes on to say: 

For the same reason I advocate the trotting bred 
horse for any other purpose the farmer may have in 
view as a breeder. Every one knows the trotter 
and the abilities of his variety in leather or pigskin, 
for park, road, or track, plow, victoria, or road wagon ; 
in the Klondyke, or South Africa, or Cuba; on the 
polo field, bridle path, hunting field or road. There 
is one breed you cannot put wrong and that is the 
trotter. If it does not fit one place it will another. 
Give the trotter a chance to take a long breath and 
look around and he'll fill every place. Now when 
you can say that and prove it of any variety of horse 
on this green earth, why "me for him"— but until 
then the Arabs and the thoroughbreds and the 
"Frenchers" and the Germans and the Hackneys, 
and the Burros and the Centipedes can all run for 
"the en.d book." When we are talking about rais- 
ing horses that anybody and everybody will buy and 
will like after they have purchased, what better kind 
of a horse than a trotter does anybody want to have 
in his fields or barn ready for market? 

This country has in the native trotter and trotting 
bred horse the fastest roadster, the speediest race 
horse, the highest stepper, the best hunter, the best 
polo pony, the most salable horse— in short, the most 
versatile horse on earth. Why not confine all our 
efforts to further refining the almost pure gold we 
possess rather than mix with it a baser metal of 
other breeds which, when their grades do earn repu- 
tations, are given all the praise regardless of the fact 
that from no other combination than our trotting 
blood, do such results accrue. You've seen many a 
good grade by a Hackney or French or other type, 
and the stallion invariably got the credit; but the 
little old trotting-bred mare that nurtured and nursed 
and gave the grade most of his good qualities never 
received a thought. That's the world over. Who- 
ever considers the mothers of great men, and reflects 
that from them came everything that was best in 
their sons? 

The Eastern farmer should breed draughters and 
harness horses because he is familiar with them; 
can handle them; and can work them if he does not 
sell them. What use is it for him to breed hunters 
or saddle horses when he does not know how to 
develop them? How many men in any country with 
all their years of experience ever succeeded in breed- 
ing hunters or saddle horses? 

Many — most — trotting stallions are "breeding' 
sound. Many have not the courage to trot fast with- 
out being urged, i. e., many stallions are naturally 
sluggish, both at jogging and at speed. By "courage' 
and gameness to trot fast even if he can't beat three 
minutes" is meant the ambition, freeness and eager- 
ness to trot in two minutes if he could— inherited 
and valuable attributes. Try to sell a harness horse 
for brougham or landau work nowadays that can't 
step out at 'round about a three-minute gait! 1 don't 
want to pay his board bill until you get rid of him. 
The more speed he has the more money he will bring, 
although the buyer knows perfectly well that eight 
miles (nearer seven) the hour is a good city or park 
pace. Still if he wants to purchase and pay big 
money for an attribute, he can't use, that is not the 
purveyor's business, but all the same it's up to the 
dealer to buy that kind. 

Hetter a small sire from a large family than vice 
versa — and any one can find out that much about the 
horse he means to use, however he may be in the 
dark about the old family mare or any other farm 
mare he means to produce from. This at least gives 
him a chance for size, and two-thirds of the balance 
is shelter, hay and oats — the three best crosses in 
any animal's pedigree. 

Action and pace the offerings must have to bring 
the money. That's what sells. Time and again we 
get well mated pairs just alike for looks. Separate 
them and one horse sells for $1000 and the other for 
$200. Pace and action make the difference and noth- 
ing else. 

I have little to say about the Hackney or his grades. 
We don't get enough of him to make a market im- 
pression. Hut we don't find buyers climbing over 
each other when we do have them. How many new 
show horses have come out recently that are hackney 
bred and toppers even though bought at phenomenal 
prices as being the best in England? They have been 
imported into America for twenty years back, but 
we do not find many of their descendants in the East- 
ern market, nor apparently in the West, where most 
of our horses come from. We are ready to receive 
the hackney grade with open arms when he comes 
in quantity and "delivers the goods." In other words, 
that he suits the buyers. 

The trade don't care two straws — nor do buyers 
— nor does the writer — how any horse is bred, so long 
as he is a good horse and a market horse. If theso 
two details don't settle the value and genuineness of 
any equine for goodness sake what does? 



The reasons why "trotting horse breeders do not 
produce show horses and high actors in quantity" 
are many and all good, in the first place no trot- 
ting horse breeders are yet wild to produce such ani- 
mals. Trotting horses have always been bred for 
something far different, yet nothing so signally dem- 
onstrated the trotting horse's marvelous versatility 
and adaptability as the fact that the moment we bal- 
anced him and asked him to go high, he beat the 
world at his novel task. Every country sent shoals 
of buyers here to carry our trotters away to locali- 
ties that had never been able, after a hundred or 
more years of effort, to produce anything that ap- 
proached our trotter for action, pace and endurance. 
This, too, he did, although for fifty years we had ex- 
hausted our ingenuity to make him "go low ' and 
"stealing gaited." If he bent his knees or "pulled'' 
his hocks we would in olden days, have none of him 
for our purposes. Furthermore, train him to go as 
high as you like and he is a trotter again. How long 
will it take to produce a pure bred hackney that will 
trot a mile in two minutes? Or three or four heats 
right 'round that notch? Yet it's as fair to ask that 
of him as to expect the trotter to be a type for 
"heavy leather." 

It is quite evident that Mr. Ware has no fear of 
the hackney ever supplanting the trotter and that 
he is a firm believer in the good doctrine that the 
trotter is the most useful and remunerative breed 
for the farmer. — Horseman. 

A fire broke out at the Indiana State fair grounds, 
Indianapolis, on January 0, that destroyed three of 
the large white barns to the east of the track. 
Four valuable horses in Float Jolly's stable were de- 
stroyed. The fire started from a defective flue in 
the office of Float Jolly, in one of the large stables 
and spread rapidly to the two stables north, occu- 
pied by V. L. Shuler and Wes Stout. One of the 
grooms employed by Jolly discovered the blaze and 
raised a cry of fire. He commenced to liberate the 
horses, but James A. and two others ran back 
into the burning structure, while one horse refused 
to move from its stall. All three of the stables 
contained a large amount of hay and feed, and that, 
together with harness, made a loss of about $2(1,000, 
aside from the horses, James A. 2:14%, by Prodigal, 
was the champion three-year-old gelding of 1909. 
Jolly had counted him good enough to stake down 
the Grand Circuit this year in his four-year-old form. 
A filly by Major C. 2:04%, dam Daisy S. 2:22, owned 
by Chas. M. Dickey of Colfax, Ind., was an exceed- 
ingly promising pacer, and was entered in many of 
the futurities for 1911. -The other two destroyed were 
a yearling filly by Major C. dam Sue Dee, by Prince 
Elwood, and a black stallion by Amara 2:ll 1 / 4 — 
Horse World. 



It is rather noteworthy that with the vast majority 
of speed sires tracing in tail-male line to Hamhle- 
tonian 10, the leading sire of new standard perform- 
ers for 1909, should belong to the small and more 
obscure clan established by Mambrino Chief 11, the 
horse being Prodigal 2:16^ by Pancoast 2:21% by 
Woodford Mambrino 2:21% by Mambrino Chief 11. 
Prodigal became a century sire last year with an 
even hundred in the list. The past season he added 
twenty new ones, as far as has been reported, which 
was one or two more than any other sire has ap- 
peared to be entitled to. — Spirit of the West. 

o 

AN HISTORIC BELL. 



Ever since Maud S. made her best record of 2:08%, 
to high-wheel sulky, back in 1885, that feat has been 
kept fresh in memory by the gilded horseshoe that 
was put up over the entrance to Gtenville track. 
When that historic course was abandoned in 1908, 
the famous souvenir was taken down and given to the 
widow of Col. William Edwards who was for so long 
the leading spirit and president of the Cleveland 
Driving Park Company. Now another memento of in- 
terest has been adopted lor the splendid new course 
at North Randall in the bell used for calling the 
horses. This was taken from a celebrated engine 
used on the Erie railroad, known popularly as "Old 
64." The bell was cast in 1876, centennial year, and 
the locomotive that carried it was one of the first 
of the eight-wheel machines built for fast passenger 
service. When number 64 was put out of commis- 
sion eight years ago, the bell was transferred to an- 
other engine of modern improved make. Whon the 
North Randall track was ready for the Grand Circuit 
flyers last August the now historic bell was bor- 
rowed for the week. The many sensations furnished 
there, including the never-to-be-forgotten contest be- 
tween Hamburg Belle and Uhlan, so impressed the 
officials of the Erie, that they decided their his- 
toric bell which had rung out the start for new 
records, should remain in its new vocation. Prior 
to this the engine on which it was placed ran be- 
tween Niles and Lisbon. The former was the boy- 
hood home of the lamented McKinley with whom 
Samuel McMillan, the well-known New York horse- 
man, went to school. From Lisbon came the Hanna 
brothers, the late Marcus Aurelius who managed the 
presidential campaign for McKinley in 1900, and 
his brother, Henry Melville, who gave $50,000 for 
Hamburg Belle just after she had placed the trotting 
race record at 2:01%. It is to be hoped that this 
centennial bell will long continue to call the stars 
of the Grand Circuit for their battles over the fast 
ground near the Forest City. — American Sportsman. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1910. 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL 



CONDUCTED BY J. X. DcWITT. 



COMING EVENTS. 



Bench Slioim. 

Jan. 18-20, 1910 — North Dakota Kennel Association. 

(License.) Fargo, No. Dak. W. R. Jenney, Sec'y. 
Jan. 20-21 — Lynn Kennel Club. Lynn, Mass. M. J. 

Donlon, Sec'y. 
Jan. 26-29 — Cleveland Fanciers' Club Company. (Li- 
censed.) Cleveland, O. J. T. Conkey, Sec'y. 
Feb. 8-11 — Fanciers' Association of Indiana. In- 
dianapolis, Ind. C. R. Millhouse, Sec'y. Entries 

close Feb. 1. 
Feb. 9-12 — Westminster Kennel Club. New York 

City. Wm. Rauch, Chairman. 
Feb. 22-25 — New England Kennel Club, Boston. Chas. 

W. Taylor Jr., Sec'y. 
March 1-3 — Pine Tree Kennel Club. Portland, Me. 

Elinor S. Moody, Sec'y. 
March 1-4 — Buffalo Kennel Club. Buffalo. N. Y. 

Seymour P. White, Sec'y. 
March 2-4— Central New York Kennel Association. 

Utica, N. Y. Thos. S. Jackson, Sec'y. 
March 8-11— Erie Kennel Club. Erie, Pa. Lyman 

T. Whitehead, Sec'y. 
March 16-19 — Duquesne Kennel Club of Western 

Pennsylvania. Pittsburg, Pa. B. Cummings, 

Sec'y. 

March 23-26 — Koiak City Kennel Club. Rochester 

N. Y. Jos. H. Church, Sec'y. 
March 21-24 — Chicago Kennel Club. Chicago, 111. F. 

A. Fisher, Sec'y. 
June 1-2 — Ladies' Kennel Association of America. 

Minneola, L. L, N. Y. Mrs. R. C. W. Wadsworth, 

Sec'y. , 

June 2-3 — Long Island Kennel Club. . 

E. H. Berendsohn, Sec'y. 
June 8 — Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts. 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. Mrs. II. M. Talbot, Sec'y. 
June 18 — Westchester Kennel Club. . 

Louis Contoit, Sec'y. 

Field Trial*. 

Jan. 11 — United States Field Trial Club. Rogers 
Springs, Tenn. W. B. Stafford, Sec'y. Grand Junc- 
tion, Tenn. 

Jan. — National Championship Field Trial Associa- 
tion. To follow IT. S. trials. Bogers Springs, Tenn. 
W. B. Stafford, Sec'y. Grand Junction, Tenn. 

Jan. 24 — Pacific Coast Field Trials Club, Bakersfleld, 
Cal. E. Courtney Ford, Sec'y, San Francisco, Cal. 

Jan. 26 — North Texas Field Trial Association. Fort 
Worth, Tex. C. T. Hodge. Sec'y. 

Feb. 1 — Lone Star Field Trial Club. San Antonio, Tex. 
E. M. Ford, Sec'y. 

THE ROMANCE OF SEAL FISHING. 



The remarkable seal-fishing industry of New Found- 
land will soon be in full swing, and on both the 
"front"' and the "back" of the island the seal ships 
will be pursuing their sanguinary work. There is 
probably not in the world another enterprise like it; 
between March 10th and April 30th, 350,000 seals, 
valued at fully $1,000,000, are captured, so it is re- 
ported is the general average, by the twenty-four 
steamers and 4000 men engaged in this pursuit. The 
last year was an eventful one in the history of this 
avocation. Three of the older captains — the last 
links of the bygone days before steam was intro- 
duced — have been struck off the list, one by death 
and two by serious illness, and of the skippers now 
in charge all are men bred to the work since the 
steam revolutionized the business. Captain Arthur 
Jackman, the most renowned of the three, as a sealer, 
whaler, arctic voyager, and dauntless viking who lost 
four vessels under him but never lost a man, though 
he cruised from Greenland to the Levant, died early 
in February; Captain Samuel IMadford, the commo- 
dore of the fleet, who had been for fifty years master 
of a sealer, was stricken with paralysis in January; 
and Captain William Windsor, who at the age of 
sixty-seven started on a 200-mile journey on foot and 
by dog-sled to join his vessel, collapsed by the way 
and had to abandon the attempt. 

Another circumstance which makes last year's seal 
hunt eventful was the loss of the Leopard on March 
8th while going ruond from St. Johns to Port Basque 
to clear for the fishing in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. 
She was beset by a midnight blizzard near Cape 
Race, enmeshed in the in-setting floes, and forced on 
the rocks, where she was broken to pieces. Her 
commander was Captain Robert Hartlett, who was in 
charge of Peary's steamer Roosevelt in the "Farthest 
North" quest last year, and he and his 103 men 
barely escaped with their lives. It illustrates the 
perils of this industry that, seven years ago, the 
steamer Hope, which had a famous Arctic record and 
rescued the Leigh-Smith expedition at Spitzbergen, 
was wrecked in the Gulf waters — the. "back of the 
Island" — in 1900, under command of his father, Cap- 
tain William Bartlett, who, with 194 men, also nar- 
rowly escaped perishing with her. 

The ships usually sail on March 10th, and after 
about forty-eight hours' steaming meet the ice-floes 
on which the young seals are born. Mothers and 
babes lie on the vast fields, which are rapidly carried 
south by the Arctic current to the warmer waters of 
the Grand Bank, where the young are taught to swim. 
At the inset of the current towards Labrador, where 
the floes are deflected by the currents along the 
northern coast of New Foundland, the sealers come 
upon their prey, and day and night are made hideous 
with the scenes that ensue. The mother seals fight 
gamely in defense of their young, but are driven off 
by the sealers' clubs, and the little ones are slaugh- 
tered in thousands. They are the best prizes, yield- 
ing the finest oil, and the skin and its adhering mass 
of fat are separated from the carcass (which has no 
value) and dragged to the ship. 



The seals are found in immense herds or "patches," 
often covering a body of ice reaching beyond the 
range of vision, and it is not uncommon to find as 
many as 250,000 seals killed in one of these herds 
and brought into St. John's. The seals are to be 
found also in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and four of 
the ships go there to hunt them, but twenty of the 
fleet operate on the Atlantic seaface of the island, 
their range extending from Belle Isle straits to the 
Grand Banks, which area of ocean is more or less 
covered with floes and berg ice every winter, to the 
great annoyance of trans-Atlantic shipping. 

The great slaughter of the young seals takes place 
between March 12th and 24th. The young ones are 
then too feeble to move, and there is no escaping the 
hunter's murderous club. Sometimes the mothers, 
alarmed at the noise which accompanies the onrush 
of the men, scramble to the blowholes in the ice by 
which they reach the water, and thus escape with 
their young. Their instinct is so perfect that a 
mother will leave her "pups" at sunrise and fish all 
day in the adjoining ocean depths, and though the ice 
has wheeled about at the mercy of the winds and 
currents, and though there are thousands of seals in 
the herd, she will make her way back to her own 
offspring in the evening. The fathers are less con- 
siderate, though they fish daily for the domestic circle 
and take their share of watching over the youngsters, 
but they will not fight for the little chaps as the 
mother will, and take to the water on the first appear- 
ance of danger. There is little sport and no danger 
in hunting the young seals, but there is one species of 
old seal, the "dog hood ' (from a kind of cowl behind 
his head), which affords abundant excitement. These 
old males are very ferocious, and one will not only, 
when attacked, face two or three sealers, but will 
sometimes put them to flight by its savage rushes 
upon them. These brutes are usually shot with 
rifles, and often weigh four hundredweight. But they 
are too full of muscle for their fat to yield rich oil, 
and their skins are too heavy to have a prime com- 
mercial value, so they are never sought unless young 
ones are scarce, in which case they are better than 
none. 

The industry is full of risks of the most desperate 
character, the men endangering their lives almost 
every day they go abroad on the floes. In their 
pursuit of the seals it is a common thing for them 
to wander six or eight miles from their ship, and if 
they get benighted or meet an accident serious con- 
sequences frequently ensue. The most horrible 
tragedy in the history of the floes was that of the 
steamer Greenland in 1898. The ship was struck by 
a blizzard, while 180 men were hunting for seals over 
the icy plain. They were left helpless, while she 
was driven to sea. Two nights and a day elapsed 
before she reached them again, and when she did, 
she found that forty-eight of them had perished from 
hunger and cold. Some had gone mad from their 
exhaustion and been frozen stiff, a few had been 
killed by fragments of ice tossed about, while others 
fell into the ocean and were drowned. Of the total 
only twenty-five bodies were recovered, the others 
having found a grave in the depths of the sea. About 
fifty of the survivors were frost-burnt, and it was a 
sad looking ship which returned to port that year. 

Fogs often shut down over the floes, and hundreds 
of men from the different ships may be isolated by 
them, incapable of regaining their vessels, and being 
kept in this pitiful plight for a whole night, scantily 
clad, poorly provisioned, and having to burn their 
boats and clubs to keep themselves warm. If the 
weather is mild without snowstorms or frosts, they 
escape with no worse mementoes of their experiences 
than a scarred nose, ear or fingers, and not a year 
passes but some such incident in the progress of the 
fishery has to be recorded. But if it is tempestuous 
some lives are certain to be sacrificed, although such 
tragedies as that of the Greenland are, fortunately, 
very infrequent. Still, whenever men are adrift there 
is keen anxiety on the ships, and poignant appre- 
hension among the castaways until the fog lifts; for 
the sounds are so deceptive in this murk that men 
dare not proceed in quest of the vessels which are 
blowing, fearing to walk into the open channels 
between the floes, where drowning will be their fate. 

The industry is one of the most arduous, and yet 
the most unremunerative, known to British colonists. 
The toil of the hunt, the exposures on the ice, the 
accidental submergings, the poor food, the insuf- 
ficient clothing, the loss of rest, the discomforts on 
shipboard, the ice-blindness, the sickness brought on 
by lack of attention and of cleanliness — all these 
things combine to make the seal fishery a dread to 
all save those whom stern necessity forces into it. 
And this is not surprising when it is found that the 
most which a man can earn as his share if the ship 
was filled would be $80, though he might be a month 
or more engaged in the hunt, while the average 
return to all men in the fleet will not exceed $50 one 
year with another. These rates are increased one- 
fifth as an outcome of the concessions gained by a 
strike. The ships themselves sometimes fare as 
badly as the men. 



NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL RIFLE 
CONTESTS. 



Announcement was made at the annual meeting of 
the board of directors of the National Rifle Associa- 
tion of America that the Argentine Republic had in- 
vited the N. R. A. to send a team of American rifle- 
men to Buenos Ayres to compete in the International 
tournament to be held there in May, 1910, in con- 
nection with the celebration of the Centennial of the 
Republic, and have made the unprecedented offer 
to pay the entire expenses of the team from the 
time of leaving the United States until its return. 
In addition the Argentine Republic will provide a 
number of prizes for the tournament, the first being 
$3000 in an individual match. Gen. James A Drain, 
the retiring president of the N. R. A., also announced 
the receipt of a check for $1200 from Hon. Robert 
Bacon, formerly Secretary of State and now Ambas- 
sador to France, to make good the deficit in the 
revenues of the Association for 1910. Last year the 
deficit was made good by Hon. George Von L. 
Meyer, Secretary of the Navy. Gen. Drain's an- 
nouncement was greeted with applause and on his 
motion Mr. Bacon was elected a benefactor and Mr. 
Meyer a patron, and both were elected honorary 
directors for life together with Secretary of War 
Dickinson and Lt. Gen. John C. Bates, retired. 

The meeting, which was held at the New Willard 
was attended by officers of the army, navy, marine 
corps and National Guard, and civilians from all 
parts of the country and was the largest ever held. 
In his valedictory, Gen. Drain who in his three years 
incumbency brought the Association to a high plane 
of efficiency, said he believed the Association had at 
last become national in character as well as name. 
He thanked the members of the board for their hearty 
co-operation and referred to the increased interest 
in rifle practice taken by the high government offi- 
cials. He recommended that the Association's matches 
be conducted in 1910 as they were in 1909 by armv 
officers and men. The work of the Association, he 
said, was to educate men and youths to the use of the 
rifle of their country, which work is based upon 
good, sound and wholesome grounds of public policy. 
A nation must be fit to defend itself in an emergency 
or it cannot continue to exist. Gen. Drain referred 
to the Hull bill to advance school boy and civilian 
rifle practice by the loan of arms and the furnishing 
of ammunition and urged that it be supported with 
all the strength of the Association. The comparative 
failure of the rifle club movement to date he ascribed 
to the difficulty of obtaining rifles and the cost of the 
rifles and ammunition. The Hull bill is endorsed by 
the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of War, Chief 
of Staff and Chief of Ordnance, and its passage, he 
declared would give this country within a few years 
from 50,000 to 1,000,000 marksmen. 

The report of Lt. Albert S. Jones, secretary of the 
Association showed that there are now offiliated with 
the Association 32 State rifle associations, 37 regi- 
ments, 53 separate military organizations, 81 civilian 
clubs and 56 school-boy clubs, total 327. The largest 
growth of the year was in the school-boy clubs which 
increased from 27 to 56. Lt. Jones reported the 
results of the school-boy tournaments in New York, 
Boston, Philadelphia, Denver and Los Angeles, and 
of the International small-bore match with England 
and Australia, which was won by England. A similar 
match will be shot this year and the permission to 
use telescopes will be of advantage to the American 
team which is now being selected. It will be com- 
posed of fifty men each firing fifty shots at 25 yards 
with 32-caliber rifles. 

It was announced that the Astor trophy had been 
won for the first time by the Morris High School 
of New York, and the results of the Indoor and Out- 
door championship matches among the university and 
college clubs were given. Indoor matches have been 
scheduled for the winter between civilian clubs in the 
Interclub League and between college and university 
clubs in the Intercollegiate League. Referring to civ- 
ilian clubs Lt. Jones stated that of 81 clubs with 3500 
members, only 347 qualified in 1909, and with Special 
Course "C" of the War Department for 1910 the num- 
ber would be less without the loan of rifles and free 
ammunition. "The cost of service ammunition is 
almost prohibitive to civilian shooters," he said. 
"Governments abroad furnish service ammunition -to 
rifle clubs at less than half what it costs the gov- 
ernment to make, and if the United States is really 
anxious to encourage rifle practice among its citizens 
it should provide a way to furnish them with am- 
munition at a cost of not more than one cent per 
cartridge." He urged that the National Guard 
authorities throughout the country throw open their 
gallery ranges for the school boys and furnish them 
with instructors and rifles to practice with. During 
1909 701 school boys qualified as Junior Marksmen. 

The board of directors of the National Rifle Asso- 
ciation now consists of the Adjutants General of 
each State and Territory; 36 members elected by the 
association; ten honorary life directors; three army 
officers appointed by the Secretary of War; one naval 
officer and one marine corps officer appointed by 
the Secretary of the Navy and one representative 
from each affiliated State Association, elected by that 
Association. General James A. Drain, who has for 
the past three years been president of the National 
Rifle Association, has announced his itnention to 
retire, and his successor will be elected at this meet- 
ing. Several new members of the executive com- 
mottee are to be elected and important questions con- 
cerning the policy of the Association in the future 
will come up for settlement. Most important of these 



Saturday, January 22, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



is the one affecting the future of the National Rifle 
Association matches. 

The National Board for Promotion of Rifle Prac- 
tice is appointed by the Secretary of War under 
authority of Congress and consists at present of 
Assistant Secretary of War Robert Shaw Oliver, 
president; Capt. H. C. Learnard, U. S. A., recorder, 
and the following members: Gen. W. P. Hall, U. S. 
A.; Capt. Dickinson P. Hall, U. S. A.; Lt. Comdr. 
Leigh C. Palmer, U. S. N.; Gen. C H Harries, D. 
C; Gen. Bird W. Spencer, N. J.; Gen. Lawrason 
Riggs, Md.; eGn. C. A. Wagner, Mich.. Lt. Col. 
A. B. Critchfield. Ohio; Gen. Charles A. Kelly, 
Colo.; Mr. J. A. Haskell, N. Y.; Gen. P. F. Wanser, 
N. J.; Gen. G. W. Wingate, N. Y.; Gen. Jas. A. 
Drain, Washington; Gen. E. C. Young, 111.; Gen. E. 
C. Dill, Me.; Col. Roy Hoffman, Oklahoma; Col. 
John Caswell, Mass.; and Major E. Claude God- 
dard, Pa. 

The report of Col. R. K. Evans, U. S. A., executive 
officer of the last National matches, will be consid- 
ered by the National Board and possibly some 
changes will be made in the rules governing the Na- 
tional match. The board will also consider the time 
and place of holding the annual matches for 1910. It 
is unlikely that any place other than Camp Perry, 
Ohio, will be considered at this time. The proposi- 
tion that the government should bear the entire ex- 
pense of the National matches, which is now divided 
between the government and the States, will be sub- 
mitted to the National Rifle Association, and if en- 
dorsed by the directors of that organization, will 
doubtless be approved by the national board. 

The National Militia Board which meets the same 
week was authorized by Congress at the time the 
militia division was created in the War Department. 
This will be its second annual meeting, and many 
matters of joint interest to the army and national 
guard will be considered. 

o 

TO PROMOTE MILITARY RIFLE PRACTICE. 



Important legislation designed to promote practice 
with the military rifle may be enacted by Congress 
this winter. The army and National Guard have 
been equipped with the new Springfield, but the 
expense of obtaining these weapons from the govern- 
ment has restricted practice among civilians. Some 
hundreds of thousands of Krags have been retired, 
however, and if available for issue would doubtless 
be an incentive to civilians to practice. Representa- 
tive Hull of Iowa, chairman of the House Committee 
on Military Affairs, has therefore introduced a bill on 
the subject which has the approval of the War 
Department as represented by the Secretary of War, 
Assistant Secretary of War, Chief of Staff and Chief 
or Ordnance, as well as of the National Board for the 
Promotion of Rifle Practice and the National Associa- 
tion of America. 

The bill provides that the Secretary of War is 
authorized to issue, without expense to the United 
States, magazine rifles and appendages, not of the 
existing service model. These are to be issued to 
rifle clubs organized under the rules of the National 
Board of Promotion of Rifle Practice, and to schools 
having uniformed corps of cadets. The Secretary of 
War is authorized to prescribe regulations to safe- 
guard the United States against loss and for the 
proper care of the arms. Should the bill become a 
law the limit of issue would probably be fixed at 
about one rifle to each ten members of a club in 
good standing. 

A second section of the bill provides for the promo- 
tion of rifle practice in schools, colleges, universities 
and civilian clubs by supplying certain ammunition, 
prizes, the holding of matches, and in other direc- 
tions, for which the sum of $100,000 is appropriated. 

Up to the present time this country has done noth- 
ing for its civilian rifle clubs, which are compara- 
tively few in number, while in England it is esti- 
mated there are nearly 3000 with a membership of 
possibly half a million men and boys. The work 
with the civilian clubs is designed to reach the "un- 
organized militia" which would constitute the bulk 
of our volunteer armies in case of war. On this sub- 
ject General Bell, the chief of staff, recently said: 
"The encouragement of rifle practice among our citi- 
zens and schoolboys is of the greatest importance 
in this country, where preparedness for war is largely 
based on the employment of an army of volunteers; 
and wisely framed laws which will give a healthy 
stimulus to this branch of military preparedness 
would receive the hearty support of the War Depart- 
ment. 

OREGON'S INDUCEMENTS FOR SPORTSMEN. 



[By A. E. Gebhardtl 
It is a fact worthy of note, and one that augurs 
well lor our Nation, that in America the number of 
sportsmen and of those who take an interest in out- 
door life and for whom the "Call of the Wild ' seems 
to have perennial charm, is constantly increasing. 
And it seems to me that this is particularly true of 
our great Western country, whose natural beauty 
and attractions are so alluring to the lover of nature. 
Indeed, no other section of the United States pre- 
sents to the lover of outdoor sports so many and 
such varied attractions as the great Pacific North- 
west, and this is particularly true of Oregon. With 
its snow-capped mountains, evergreen forests, ma- 
jestic rivers and lovely mountain streams, this State 
is a veritable paradise, for one who can enjoy the 
sublime and beautiful in nature, and there are few 
sportsmen who are indifferent to the glories of 
natural scenery. What sportsman can forget the joy 
that filled his very soul with rapture when, in the 



excitement of the chase, he was brought suddenly 
face to face with some awe-inspiring, soul-uplifting 
scene. Here, at his feet is, perhaps-, a great canyon 
with a roaring stream in its depths. Yonder a mag- 
nificent waterfall, a glittering sheet thundering over 
a precipice hundreds of feet high, boiling in white 
foam at its base, while far in the distance there are 
great stretches of snow-capped mountain ranges and 
vast forests of fir and pine and spruce and hemlock, 
through which mighty rivers wind their courses to 
the sea. 

If you are a hunter and take delight in the search 
for large game, come with me to the Blue Moun- 
tains of Eastern Oregon or to the beautiful valleys 
of the Rogue and Umpqua rivers in the southeastern 
portion of the State. There, in forests as dense and 
wild as any on this continent, you will find the bear, 
the deer and the elk in numbers. 

If you prefer smaller game, you can have sport to 
your heart's content in pursuit of that most beautiful 
of game birds, the Chinese pheasant, which is found 
in abundance in the great valley of the Willamette, 
stretching for nearly 400 miles from north to south 
in the western portion of the State. All hunters 
agree that there are few birds that will try ono s 
patience more or deceive one oftener, than this pheas- 
ant. But when you have bagged him you have not 
only a bird of graceful outlines and of most gor- 
geous and beautiful plumage, but one whose flesh 
will satisfy the most epicurean taste. 

In nearly all the valleys and foothills of the State 
you will also find the native pheasant or grouse, the 
partridge and the quail; and in Eastern Oregon, espe- 
cially in the Blue Mountain region, you will also 
find the sage hen and prairie chicken. 

As for ducks, geese, swan and other water fowl, 
they can be found on nearly every bay, lake and 
stream in the State, but if you want to see them in 
such numbers as have never before gladdened your 
eyes, a trip to their breeding grounds in the Klamath 
Lake region in Southern Oregon will certainly be a 
revelation to you. There you will find great areas of 
water, thousands of acres, literally covered with 
ducks, geese, swans, snipe, plovers, pelicans and 
other aquatic fowl. A portion of this wonderful re- 
gion has been set aside as a game preserve and is 
well patrolled, and there hundreds of thousands of 
these water fowl nest and rear their young every 
year unmolested. 

But it is to the angler that Oregon presents special 
attractions, for its numerous mountain streams, wild 
torrents hurrying down from their elevated sources, 
and now and then resting in still pools, with waters 
cold and clear, are the haunts of the lusty trout, the 
grayling and other species of game fish; while the 
great rivers, at certain seasons of the year, contain 
an abundance of salmon, smelt, shad, bass and other 
varieties of fish. 

The "cut-throat," one of the hardiest and gamest 
of trout, is a native of this State and may be found 
in nearly all of our streams. But if you are particular 
as to the species you want, nature has here lavishly 
provided a good variety for you. In the upper Clack- 
amas, the Deschutes, Williamson and Mackenzie 
rivers you will find the Dolly Varden trout whose 
size, beauty and gamey qualities are well known 
to all sportsmen. In these and various other streams 
of the State may also be found the Eastern brook 
trout, and the rainbow trout, many thousands of 
which have been planted by the Federal government. 

I have spoken to many experienced anglers, some 
of whom have fished in the best streams of Europe 
and America, and they are almost unanimous in their 
loud praises of the excellence of sport in Oregon 
streams, especially those in the southern portion of 
the State. 

The numerous coast streams also afford most ex- 
cellent trout and salmon fishing. And at Yaquina 
bay, one of the most beautiful sheets of water of 
the entire coast, you can in season have royal sport 
in fishing for that finest of large game fishes, the 
salmon. The sportsman who has all his life fished 
in the quiet, limpid waters of our Eastern and Middle 
Western States, cannot realize the exciting sport 
that salmon fishing affords until he himself has 
attempted it. Your spoonhook is whirling in the 
swift current. Suddenly you feel a tremendous jerk, 
and the next instant a steel-gray object leaps high 
out of the water and lashes it into foam. You have 
hooked a salmon, but wait. He is not yet your own. 
Hooking a salmon and landing one are very different 
feats, as you will fully realize after a little experience. 
Many times before you land him, if indeed you are 
fortunate enough to do so at all, you will be wonder- 
ing who will be the captor. 

But how inadequate words seem to depict all this 
grandeur and natural wealth. How useless to attempt 
to describe it. To see will alone satisfy and convince. 
In Oregon nature seems to worship at her own 
shrine, for — 

"The cedar and the mountain pine, 

The willow on the fountain's brim, 

The tulip and the eglantine 

In reverence bend to Him; 

The songbirds pour their sweetest lays 

From tower and tree and middle air. 

The rushing rivers murmur praise — 

All Nature worships there." 

o 

Arizona sportsmen are enjoying venison steaks, 
the open season for bucks is now on in Mexico. In 
the district south of Douglas, game of all kinds is 
very plentiful. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



WITH ROD AND GUN IN ARGENTINA. 



[By Captain W. W. P. Benson.] 

"A goldfish swam in a big glass bowl, as dear little 
goldfish do," sang "O Mimosa San" in "The Geisha," 
but what would she have said or sung if she had seen 
a huge goldfish of some forty pounds in weight jump- 
ing high out of the water at the end of a line? But 
this she might have seen, as anyone can see today on 
any of the tributaries of the Rio de la Plata, a few 
miles out from Buenos Aires. 

El Dorado, the goldfish, is the most sporting fresh- 
water fish in South American waters. You fish for 
him as you would fish for pike — that is to say, with a 
natural dead bait (as shiny as possible) on a good, 
strong spinning trace — of annealed wire preferably; 
it is infinitely better than gimp, because it is stronger, 
finer, and less conspicuous in the water — or with a 
float, live bait, and "snap" tackle. The bait should 
not be deeper than a yard below the surface of the 
water. The Dorado fights as well as a tarpon or a 
salmon, and your chances of luring him are far 
greater, for the water is always cloudy. He never 
can see you, and he cannot perceive the tackle, but 
this cloudiness necessitates a bright bait being used. 
He himself would, like a Frenchman, probably prefer 
a frog, but it is tco dull a bait to be more than rarely 
successful. 

The Zuribe, or tiger fish, as he is called by reason 
of his being marked like that animal, is also to be 
caught in the same waters with much the same sort 
of tackle, and in similar manner, except that the bait 
should be much nearer the bottom, in this case it 
would be better to dispense with a float and allow 
your bait to sink and float out with the stream; in 
fact, this method can be adopted for both the Zuribe 
and the Dorado. The Zuribe runs up to about a hun- 
dred pounds in weight, and has an enormous head, 
which at first sight is rather startling. He, how- 
ever, does not jump out of the water, and, after the 
first big rush, is practically done for, there then 
being little more than his weight to contend against. 

Then there is the Pacu, a flat fish, running up to 
about forty pounds in weight, a sort of fresh-water 
turbot, with ribs like those of a lamp. So alike are 
they, indeed, that the Pacu cutlets to be obtained at 
the retsaurants are hardly distinguishable from lamb 
cutlets. You fish for him with a float and pendant 
hook, which should not be deeper than a foot and a 
half below the surface, and the bait should be a peach 
or a pear. It is curious that a flat fish should feed 
so close to the surface, but so it is. 

But the best sporting fish after the Dorado is the 
Boga, a white fish of the salmon-trout size and 
species. He does jump out of the water when hooked. 
Here, again, a float should be used, but with a much 
smaller hook — a good-sized perch hook or stout 
salmon gut, and a snail for bait, about a foot below 
the surface of the water. The Boga runs up to twelve 
or fifteen pounds in weight, and fights well for his 
size. 

All this fishing can be had within an hour's rail- 
way journey from Buenos Aires, the Tigre and all 
the little rivers forming the delta of the Parana being 
full of fish. Perhaps the best place of all is Fray 
Bentos, on the Uruguay, on the opposite side of the 
Rio de la Plata to the Tigre. 

Leaving Buenos Aires at 10 a. m. by the river 
steamer, Fray Bentos (where, by the way, Liebig's 
extract of meat is manufactured) is reached at 1 or 2 
o'clock in the afternoon. There is nothing very 
swagger in the way of hotel accommodation, but 
there is a very fair inn at which we can put up, and 
which we can put up with for a night or two. Your 
ardent angler is not a stickler for luxury. A row- 
boat with a man costs a dollar (about Is. 8d.) an 
hour, or six dollars a day. The boatman, at short 
notice, will provide all the bait you require. 

If you shoot you can get very good sport with the 
gun within an hour's ride of Buenos Aires — at San 
Vincente, or Canuelas, on the Southern Railway, or 
at Moron Merlo, on the Western Railway. Here 
everything but big game is to be had — partridge, six 
varieties of duck, snipe, plover, hares, etc. You will 
probably be accompanied by some one owning dogs, 
but, if not, they can be hired. They are not only good 
pointers, but good retrievers too. 

For bigger game, such as the Guanacho of the 
llama-vicuna family, as big as a cow, and for the 
large partridge, which is as big as a hen turkey, you 
must go as far as Curra-Malal, some 350 miles south 
of Buenos Aires, on the Southern Railway. Here, too, 
you may get Venado, a small deer, which, by the way, 
is capital eating. No gun license required, and the 
shooting is practically free. 

To the sportsman in general and the angler in 
particular, in search of something new, no place 
offers greater attractions than Argentina. The trip 
out and home is perfectly delightful. Leaving South- 
ampton every Friday, the Royal Mail steamers call 
en route at Vigo, Lisbon, Madeira. Pernambuco, 
Bahla, Rio de Janeiro and Monte Video. It is prac- 
tically a cruise, full of variety. As to "kit," one's 
ordinary summer clothing will serve admirably. 

And apart from sport, how interesting is the history 
of Argentina since the sixteenth century. The sub- 
division of the empire of the mighty Incas by the 
Conquistadores, the story of the rise and fall of the 
Jesuit empire, the toil and teaching of the brave 
mission fathers (ruins of whose monuments still exist 
in the district which bears their name — Misiones); 
and then the fight for and the gain of independence — 
all this and much more is written on t lie pages of 
Argentine history. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1910. 



PACIFIC COAST FIELD TRIALS. 



Great progress has been made and a remarkable 
increase of public interest shown since the earliest 
field trial in the United States held more than a 
quarter of a century ago. There are now four annual 
field trial meetings held by Pacific Coast sportsmen. 
The Pacific Coast Field Trials Club will hold the 
club's twenty-seventh annual trials near Bakersfield, 
beginning Monday, January 24th. 

Every owner of a well-bred pointer or setter is in- 
terested in our Coast field trials. The dogs represent 
the best blood lines of the day, going back for many 
generations. The bird dogs of the present day are 
the result of breeding for the most desirable qualities 
and the elimination of faults. 

Secretary Courtney E. Ford has received the fol- 
lowing nominations for the All-Age event: 

Joseph E. Terry, Sacramento, English setter Eury- 
dice (Ch. Kilgarif-Moxey Danstone). 

Hon. Charles N. Post, Sacramento, English setter 
Lovelass (Count Whitestone- Loveknot). 

J. \V. Considine, Seattle. English setter Thier's Dot 
(Thiers Dan-Melrose Toodles). 

J. W. Considine, Seattle, English setter Kil's Viola 
(Ch. Kilgarif-Roxane). 

J. W, Considine, Seattle, English setter Kil's Jessie 
(Ch. Kilgarif-Melrose Norah). 

E. Courtney Ford, San Francisco, English setter 
Tiburon (Uncle Fontaine-Ch. Belle Fontaine). 

Christenson & Smith, English setter St. Ives (Uncle 
Fontaine-Ch. Belle Fontaine). 

Smith and Terry, English setter Kil's Linda (Ch. 
Kilgarif-Moxey Danstone). 

Among other entries are those, it is reported, of 
the Tevis Stockdale Kennels, W. H. Estabrook for- 
merly of Yreka, J. G. Kerckhoff and John Schu- 
macher of Los Angeles, all pointer entries. 

The entries for the Derby closed in November with 
seventeen nominations. The entires for the Members 
and Champion stakes will close the night before those 
events are run. Besides the purses, there have been 
donated three valuable cups for the Derby, All-Age 
and Members' stakes. The winner of the Champion 
stake and also the runner-up, will receive cup 
trophies. 

The class of the All-Age dogs is a notable one, for 
with but few exceptions every entry has won at 
different trials, both on the Coast and in the East. 
St. Ives, Kil's Viola and Kil's Linda have each won 
recently in various Eastern trials. 

The attendance of sportsmen at the coming meet- 
ing promises a large gathering of sportsmen from 
many Coast points as well as from some Eastern 
cities. 

The judges selected are: Henry L. Betten of Ala- 
meda and William Dormer of Oakland. 

The true sportsman finds as much, it not more, real 
genuine pleasure in watching his dogs hunting and 
locating game with all their natural and acquired skill 
than he does in bagging the game. It is the sport of 
a gentleman who delights in nature manifesting 
itself. 

The dogs are bred primarily for the love of the 
animal, truly termed "Man's best friend," and many 
there are now who devote almost as much attention 
to their kennels as to their racing stables, good dogs 
commanding a price, for breeding of the bird dog 
is a venture full of uncertainty and so many ob- 
stacles that few even among the "initiated" fully 
realize the ceaseless efforts required on the part 
of successful breeders and fanciers to attain the 
instinct and sagacity required of the animals in 
hunting game birds. 

This is not the work of a day or season. It is a 
decidedly complex problem, for the bird dog is not 
really a natural animal, but rather a creation born 
of necessity. He has many peculiar traits that are 
purely artificial and can be i>erpetuated only by 
vigilance and forethought. Bench show requisites 
do not dictate the procedure, for the bird dog must 
be bred for brains and must combine in a small 
agile body, speed, endurance, courage, sense of 
smell and tractability. He must have qualities that 
are peculiarly his own and which are points upon 
which his especial merit hangs, namely, form, style, 
character, bird sense and pointing instinct or ability 
to handle game. The last three characteristics 
are, of course, the most important, but at the same 
time the most difficult to perpetuate in breeding. 

The bird instinct which manifests itself even in 
the puppy just begining to frolic around and chase 
anything with wings, from a grasshopper or butterfly 
up to the barnyard fowls, is no doubt the result of 
centuries of training of certain breeds of dogs to 
hunt feathered game. This may now be regarded as 
a natural instinct. It is the one characteristic which 
separates the bird dog from all others of his species. 
It is peculiarly an attribute of the pointer and set- 
ter, because they have been specially selected by 
breeders and fanciers for this purpose. They are 
generations chead of all others of the canine tribe 
in development in this respect. Which breed excels 
is an open question. 

Reports from the trial grounds are indicative 
of plenty birds to work the dogs on and other con- 
ditions are favorable. W. R. Coutts and his two boys 
are located near Bakersfield with a large string of 
pointers and setters. Fred Coutts has a training 
camp near Ensenada. "Doc" Wilson is working his 
charges near Bakersfield. "Mace" Dodge, assisted 
by Charles North, is still with the Stockdale kennels. 
One or two trainers from Los Angeles will handle 
dogs during the trials. 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 

In past years, closely following the end of the 
open season on wild feathered game, local sportsmen 
were not slow in paying enthusiastic attention to 
the sport of trap shooting — just to keep their shot- 
guns from rusting. 

For the first season in almost a quarter of a cen- 
tury the powder-burners are without a local shoot- 
ing ground. With the c'osing of the Ingleside trap 
grounds last September, the best grounds the shoot- 
ers here ever had, there came the necessity of looking 
around for a new location. The San Francisco Trap 
Shooting Association which heretofore was the con- 
trolling influence in all important tournaments, had 
disposed of its property and left matters in the hands 
of the local clubs and individual shooters. 

The only local blue rock shoot ng club still in the 
game is the Golden Gate Gun Club. Efforts made 
to secure suitable grounds, easy of access from this 
city, were unsuccessful. It is just possible that an 
arrangement may be made to shoot with the Oak- 
land Gun Club. At all events it looks as if the 
trap shooters will have to go over to the Alameda 
grounds for a crack at inanimate targets. 

On the other side of the bay, the blue rock shoot- 
ers are preparing for a lively year. It is reported 
that the Oakland Gun Club propose to hold a big 
tournament during the coming season in which there 
will be $2000 in purses distributed. 

The Calitornia Wing Club, which has been in 
existence over thirty years, it is intimated will fit 
up grounds on the east bay shore near the Vigorlt 
powder works. 

The customary Washington's birthday blue rock 
shoot will not, this year, take place in San Francisco 
county. The Wing Club's initial shoot on the first 
Sunday in March, will, if the contemplated pro- 
gram is carried out, take place in Contra Costa 
county. 

A movement has been started by San Joaquin val- 
ley sportsmen with the purpose in view of organiz- 
ing a valley association of gun clubs. If a suffi- 
cient number of clubs entertain the proposition, a 
schedule of tournaments, one in each city, will be 
arranged. 

The Madera Rod and Gun Club has taken the ini- 
tiative and announces a three-day's blue rock shoot 
during April next. 




A week ago the quail shooters evidently found 
weather and other conditions favorable. In the vicin- 
ity of Livermore a number of shooters returned with 
strings of quail, limits of twenty were not in the 
majority: from half a dozen to fifteen birds was 
the general showing. O. M. Goldaracena had an 
outing in good ground, if his string of birds was 
any evidence. From some sections in Sonoma county, 
notably so near Bodega, quail returns were pleasing. 

English snipe are decidedly erratic in their ways. 
Here today and gone tomorrow. Often, to the great 
bother of the hunter, on favorite ground when the 
longbills are expected to "work" well, they are 
wild as March hares. Such was the experience of 
the veteran sportsman, John K. Orr, a week ago, 
shooting over excellent snipe country near Olema. 
Fifteen birds with forty shells for a crack shot and 
good snipe hunter bears out his assertion that sev- 
enty and eighty yard rises were in the majority. 
Fred Butler had an easier time with the snipe near 
Marshall's where he shot a limit. 



"Doc" Stewart, the famous goose hunter of Rio 
Vista, one of the best "callers" of that section, noted 
for good wild fowl hunters, has retired practically 
from the game. For years past he has taken sports- 
men out on goose shoots, but has now put away 
his gun. The bunch of live decoy geese he had 
trained to lead their congeners into trouble has been 
turned over to the Park Commission, and the traitor- 
ous birds are now domiciled in Stow lake. 



On February 15th the duck season will come to an 
end, just a little over three weeks shooting is still on 
the duck hunters' calendar. Stormy weather will 
probably mark the waning days of the season with 
patchy results. 

Birds are very plentiful in some districts, local 
shooters, however, have not had the luck generally 
to find these good shooting gorunds. Best results 
recently have been obtained on preserves located 
some distance from this city. 

That there are plenty birds somewhere is shown by 
the number of wild duck hawkers on our streets. The 
birds are mainly spoonbills and mallards. The 
market hunters know the country and when the birds 
scatter out after a storm they get them. 

From now on there will be more or less the ele- 



ment of chance for the local trigger trippers when 
bent on bagging ducks at the different resorts. 
The sportsmen in the lower reaches of San Joaquin 
valley and south of Tehachapi will have an inning 
with the main body of ducks from this section of the 
State, for down south they will go and stay until 
the migratory instinct prompts flight for northern 
breeding grounds. 

The high water in the Yolo and San Joaquin basins 
has had a corresponding influence on the up river 
and Suisun marsh country. The ducks seek the open 
overflowed ground and places where it is difficult 
to get within shot, and where it is alo unfavorable 
territory to "work" them with decoys or otherwise. 
Reports from (he Knights Landing districts are that 
mallard and widgeon ducks are there by the thous- 
ands. 



San Pablo bay a week ago was well covered with 
oil, many ducks and sea-gulls were picked up, the poor 
birds being so coated with refuse oil as to be unable 
to fly or swim. The oil nuisance has been disagree- 
ably spread over many other sections of the bay 
waters. The present diffusion of the stuff seems 
to be on the wholesale order. It has been found in 
the overflows as far up as Collinsville. Petaluma 
creek has kept up its reputation for drawing large 
bonuses of oil when the distribution is going on. 

San Francisco Striped Bass Club members and 
guests met Saturday at a popular downtown restau- 
rant last Saturday evening, the occasion being the 
club's annual banquet and installation of officers for 
the ensuing year. 

Charles P. Landresse, the retiring president, acted 
as toastmaster. The menu was good, the songs ex- 
cellent, the music pleasing and the stories enter- 
taining. 

The newly elected board of officers is composed 
of Emil Acceret, president; Chris L. Johnson, vice- 
president; James S. Turner, secretary, and Charles 
H. Kewell, treasurer. 

The list of prize winners for the season of 1909, 
the lucky anglers who caught big fish and large 
catches and did other stunts appreciated by those 
who go down to the sea in gum boots is in the order 
named. J. G. Bliss, James S. Turner, A. L. Bowley, 
Charles E. Urfer, Monte Button. Fred Franzen, Tim 
Lynch. Charles P. Landresse, A. V. Thornton, James 
Lynch, Emil Acceret and Howard Vernon. 

The jolly anglers and guests present were: Chris. 
L. Johnson, Charles H. Kewell. Charles P. Landresse, 
James Lynch, Frank O'Donnell, M. J. Hynes, E. Alt- 
vater, A. L. Bowley. George C. Browne. Ed J. Con- 
lin, Jack Duckel, Fred Franzen, M. J. Geary, Joseph 
.1. Garbarino, Emil Acceret, Tim Lynch Harold J. 
Ladd, Frank Marcus, Frank Messner, James S. Tur- 
ner, Will S. Turner, Otto F. Thiele Jr.. Alvin W. 
Thornton, Howard Vernon. J. C. Wallace. P. H. L. 
Wilson, Speck Smith, George Hopkins, Howard Mc- 
Avoy, Mr. Robinson, J. X. De Witt. J. G. Bliss, H. P. 
Draper, James A. Watt, Stewart Hynes, Al Larsen. 



The California Anglers' Association at the annual 
meeting January 17th elected the following Board of 
Directors: George A. Wentworth, Dr. Henry Abrahm, 
Harry Gosliner, George F. Roberts and W. J. Street. 

During the business meeting the fifth annual report 
of the Hoard of Directors was read (which will ap- 
pear in our next issue), and was received by the 
large number of members present with much satis- 
faction. 

Alter the more serious affairs were disposed of a 
jolly "smoker" ensued. Songs, stories, music and 
other entertainment make up a most enjoyable even- 
ing's entertainment. 



Steelhead angling goes into close season Febru- 
ary 1st until April 1st. Put few- fish have been taken 
for a week or more, weather conditions interfered. 

Peters Points. 

The record of H. E. Poston for four months' trap 
shooting last year, 95.2 per cent, 3094 out of a total 
of 3250 targets was made with Peters factory 
loaded shells. 

At Tacoma, Wash., he won general high average 
427 x 465, June 22 and 23, Washington State tour- 
nament. 

High general average 120 x 125 at Vancouver, 
B. C., July 1. 

High general average, Seattle, Wash., July 4, with 
94 out of 100. 

At the Utah State shoot, Ogden, Utah, August 11, 
12 and 13, second general average, breaking 407 out 
of 425. 

At the Western Boosters' tournament, Anaconda, 
Mont., August 17, 18 and 19, he made second general 
average, 48fi out of 500. At 21 yards he broke 
92 x 100. 

At Seattle, Wash, the Pacific Coast Handicap, 
August 24, 25 and 26, 317 breaks out of 330 targets 
shot at gave him fourth general average place. 

At Tacoma, Wash, August 29, first general average 
with 117x120. 

He shot a tie for third general average at Portland, 
Ore., 192 out of 200, September 3. 

At the Pacific Coast Indian shoot at Medford, Ore., 
September 7, 8 and 9, second general average, 
439 x 460. 

At the Arizona and New Mexico Sportsmen's Asso- 
ciation shoot, September 24, 25 and 26 at Tucson, 
Ariz., he won first general average, breaking 495 
out of 525 targets. 



Saturday, January 22, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 




THE HAND SEPARATOR. 

The dairy farmer who is using a 
hand separator should make certain 
that it is doing good work. It is not 
safe to conclude that the separator is 
skimming satisfactorily just because 
no cream rises to the top when the 
skim milk is held for several hours. 
It should be remembered that milk 
must contain over 25 per cent butter- 
fat before cream will be visible. This 
means that one pound of butterfat in 
16 may be lost in separating 4 per 
cent milk without the owner detect- 
ing the loss unless he uses the Bab- 
cock test. 

It is a good plan to have samples 
tested occasionally and the butter 
maker at the local creamery is usually 
willing to do the testing. If not, sam- 
ples can be sent to the State experi- 
mental station, where tests are made 
free of charge. 

Thre are some hand separators that 
do better work than others under ad- 
verse conditions, but practically all of 
the centrifugal machines (the so-called 
water separators are not entitled to 
the term) will do satisfactory work 
when run under proper conditions. 
Such conditions are briefly as follows: 

The separator should be set on a 
firm foundation and the frame should 
be perfectly level. 

The tinware should be in its proper 
place and should not be bent out of 
shape. 

The bearings should fit snugly on 
spindle and should be replaced when 
badly worn. The bowl should run 
without vibrating. 

The speed should be uniform and 
always higher rather than lower 
than directions prescribe. 

The milk should be skimmed imme- 
diately after being drawn from the 
cow. *If cooled it should be heated to 
95 degrees before separating. 



The bearings should be kept well 
oiled and the bowl and tinware thor- 
oughly washed and sterilized or 
scalded after each separating. — J. H. 



o 

When pigs are living atone, and 
standing still or making slow growth, 
what they are eating is practically 
wasted as there is no gain from it. 
And further, it requires time for them 
to overcome this unthrifty habit and 
begin growing again and all of the 
food that is required to re-establish 
the growing habit is wasted. 



Tt is important that we make the 
most of our grain foods by mingling 
them with cheap, coarse feeds, there- 
by reducing the cost of feeding. 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAULT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure tor 

Curb, Splint, Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumors. Cures all skin 
diseases or Parasites, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
Removes all Bunches from Horses or 
Cattle. 

As a HUMAN REM KI> V for Rheu- 
matism, Sprulna, Sore Throut, et«-, It 

is invaluable. 

Every bottle of Canntle Balsam sold Is 
Warranted to pive satisfaction. Price J$l.l»0 
per bottle. Sold by drupcists, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for its 
use. Send for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Address 

TEK LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio 



Here is an Opportunity to Buy the Standard Trotting Stallion 
F A I R H I L L S REGISTERED NO. 42617 

and a splendid collection of choice trotting stock at a very low price. 

F YIKIIIM.s 42017 was foaled In 1303 at the Palo Alto Stock Farm. He is a 
bright bay In color, stands 15.3 hands and weighs 1180 pounds. He Is as hand- 
some as a picture and has the individuality and muscularity that made his sire 
so famous. He Is very gentle and thoroughly broke. When a three-year-old 
he was given to John Phlppen, who, in seven weeks, drove him some fast quarters. 
Distemper broke out among the horses at the old San Jose track, so Fairhiils 
suffering from a slight attack, was sent to Hopland. The calamity of April 18th 
following, it was not deemed advisable to place him again in training. Mr. Phip- 
pen claims he Is one of the purest-gaited, most level-headed trotters he ever 
drove. The breeding of this horse should commend him to horsemen. As a foal- 
getter, he Is absolutely sure, and all the colts and fillies by him are bays in 
color and natural trotters; they know no other gait. 

I \ ii ii ii. L S was sired by Mendocino 2:ll>'/ 2 (sire of Monte Carlo 2:07%, Men- 
dolita 2:07V4, Idollta 2:09%. Claro 2:11%, Leonora 2:12%, Polka Dot 2:14%, and 
8 others in 2:30), son of Electioneer 125 and Mano (dam of 2 and 2 sires of 16) 
by Piedmont 2:17; second dam Mamie (dam of 2) by Hambletonian, Jr.; third 
dam Gilda by Mango, and on to the 14th dam, Old Montague Mare. 

I MKilll was out of Mary Osborne (2) 2:2S</ 2 (dam of Dorothea A. 2:29% 
and the dam of May Worthy 2:29%), by Azmoor 2:20% (sire of Moortrlx 2:07%, 
Betonica 2:09%, Bob 2:15 and the dams of Rowellan 2:09%, Arzilla 2:12%, etc.) 
by Electioneer, out of Mamie C. (dam of 3 In 2:30 and the dam of Aldeana 2:25) 
by imported Hercules; second dam by Langford, son of Williamson's Belmont, etc. 

The second dam of Fairhiils was KImIo, the greatest speed-producing daughter 
of Gen. Benton. She was the dam of Rio Alto 2:16% (a sire). Novelist 2:27 (a 
sire), Palita (2) 2:16 (dam of 2 and of Palite, sire of Pal, the unbeaten two-year- 
old of 1909, with a record of 2:17%), Mary Osborn (2) 2:28%, and Salvina 2:30. 

The third dam was Elaine 2:20 (dam of Iran Alto 2:12%, a sire. Palatine 
2:18, Altoaine 2:29% and Anselma 2:29%) by Messenger Duroc (sire of 23 In the 
2:30 list). 

The fourth dam was Green Mountain Maid (dam of Electioneer and 9 in the 
2:30 list) by Harry Clay 45, etc. 

Every dam in Fairhiils' pedigree to the fourth generation is either a 2:30 per- 
former or a great broodmare. As an outcross for Wilkes, Nutwood and Director 
mares this strongly bred Electioneer stallion should produce horses perfect in 
gait, color and disposition, that will have early and extreme speed. He has every- 
thing in his favor, and should be given a record well below 2:20 this year. The 
only reason for selling is retiring from the business of breeding trotters, and will 
sell at extremely low prices, considering their breeding, soundness and individual- 
ity, every head, including some choicely bred mares by McKinney, Mendocino 
2:19%, Searchlight 2:03% and Monterey 2:09%, and all the colts and Allies by 
Kinney Lou 2:07>4, Mendocino 2:19% and Fairhiils. Most of them are eligible for 
registration; all the mares but two being registered. 

This is a grand chance for some one to get a bargain. For further particulars 
and catalogue, address HOPLAND STOCK FARM, 

Hoplanil, Mendocino County, Col., 
or 1210 Flood IlullillnK, Snn Frnnelneo. Cnl. 

Hew Edition of John Spian's Book 

"Life With the Trotter" 

Price, $3.00, Postpaid. 

" Life With the Trotter gives ua a clear insight into the ways and msa.ni to be adopted to increase 
pace, and preserve it when obtained. This work is replete with interest, and should be read by all 
sections of society, as it inculcates the doctrines of kindness to the horse from start to finish. 

Address. Breeder and Sportsman I'. O. Drawer 447, San Francisco. Cal. 

Pacific Bids-.. Cor. Market and Fourth Sts. 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 



Every Horse Should Be Clipped in Season 

It is the wise thing to do for the clipped horse not only is easier to clean and looks better, but clipping does much to make him 
immune from coughs, colds and the usual ills that come to a horse from standing in a coat of long, wet hair after any hard 

exertion. The prespiration evaporates quickly from the clipped animal and leaves him dry. On 
cold days a blanket when he stands keeps him comfortable. 

The Best Clipping Machine the World has ever Seen is the 




Stewart Ball Bearing Enclosed Gear Machine 

It is the easiest turning, fastest clipping and most enduring- of all machines. The materials in it are 
all of better quality, the workmanship is superior. All file hard cut steel gears, protected from dust 
and dirt and running constantly in oil. It couldn't be better for twice the money. 

Write for the New Catalog Send Now 

CHICAGO FLEXIBLE SHAFT COMPANY, 204 Ontario Street, CHIGA60 




Insure Your Live Stock 



I N DIANA AND OHIO 

4f 




INSU&CS 

Norses, Mul es& Cattle 

again sr DEATH rffOM 
ANY CAUS E 

ESTABLISHED 1886 



Ctato A ironic w - T. CLEVER DON, 350 Sansoms St., San Francisco. 
OldlB A&eillb. j. ED VAN CAMP, Germain Bldg., Los Anfalss. 



LARGEST and OLDEST 
STOCK COMPANY 



Assets $350,000. 

No Assessments. 



Responsible parties with 
good business desiring 
agencies apply to State 
Agents. 



HEALD'S 
BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

trains 
for 
Business 
and places 
its graduates 
in positions. 



CaJI or write 

425 McAllister st. 

San Francisco. 



WM. F. EGAN, M.R.C.V.S. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 

1155 Colden Cate Av» 

Brunch Hospital, corner Webster una chestnut 
Streets. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1910. 



It is a bad practice to keep too many 
pigs together and compel them to 
sleep in one nest. If possible do not 
allow more than eight or ten to sleep 
in one place during the winter. 

Pigs that are allowed to pile up will 
come out in the morning sweating, and 
be sure to be troubled more or less 
with colds and snuffles. 

There are limits to fine breeding. 
We can push the demand for fancy 
points for certain elegant qualities till 
we pass the point of real progress 



MARDI GRAS EXCURSION 



Personally conducted to the great festival 
city, New Orleans, leaves San Francisco 

JANUARY 29, '10. 

ROUND TRIP $67.50 

Tickets good for thirty days' trip, via the 
famous ocean to gulf line. 

SUNSET ROUTE 

One hundred mile ride along the ocean 
shores of the Pacific. Through Southern 
California orange groves, the rice, cotton 
and sugar fields of Texas and I>ouisiana. 
Picturesque bayous, the Teche, Land of 
Evangeline. 

Oil burning locomotives. 

No soot. No cinders. 
Through drawing-room sleepers, berths, 
sections, drawing-rooms, dining, parlor 
and observation car service. Steam 
heated and electric lighted throughout. 
Ten days' stopover at New Orleans on 
all first-class tickets reading to points 
East. 

Through tourist car service to New Or- 
leans, Washington, Cincinnati, St. Louis 
and Chicago. 

Write for our beautifully illustrated 
booklet, "Winter in New Orleans." 
Tells in detail of the attractions of the 
Crescent City and the wonders of the 
Mardi Gras. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Ticket Offices— Flood Building. Market St. Ferry 
Depot, Third and Townsend Sts.. Depot. Broad- 
way and Thirteenth St.. Oakland. 



when our animals will suffer a loss of 
stamina and a consequent loss of re- 
production. 

COACH STALLION FOR SALE. 

Registered, imported French coach 
stallion; handsome, stylish, sound, of 
good disposition; 17 hands high; weight 
about 1400 pounds; beautiful bright 
bay, color running back 10 generations 
on both sides without a break; sure, 
splendid sire; colts of fine form, color, 
style and action. For particulars and 
price, address L S. c I I I I : \ . 

Gllroy, < ill. 





StygO 

You Ought to Know 

all about this sulky if you are in 
need of a bike. Ask for our large 
catalog — it's mailed free. Also book 
of photos of famous horses drawing 
sulky. 

The McMurray Sulky Go. 

Marion, Ohio. 

Full line of speed and road carts, 

wagons, etc. 
Write W. J. Kenney, SSI Valencia 
St.. San Francisco, Cal.. for Catalog 




Zolock 2.05J w 



Terms: 
$50. 

Will ma 



Sire of 

Sherlock Holmes 1 .! ;06 R. Ambush 

Delilah 2:06K 

Bystander - - 2:07% 
Josephine - - 2.07% 
etc 

By McKinney 2:llK. dam. the great brood 
mare, Gazelle 2:11% 



2:09J4 

Velox - - 2:09% 
Boton de Oro 2:10J4 

Mc O. D. 2:11% 

etc. 



McKinnsy's Fastest Entire Son 



short season, Dec. 1 it to April 1st, st 

SAN JOSE DRIVING PARK, SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Monterey Road. 

Address, N. S. YOUNG, San Jose 




For DISTEMPER 



Pink Eye, Epizootic, Shipping 
Fever and Catarrhal Fever. 

Sure cure and positive preventive, no matter how 
horses at any age are infected or "exposed." Liquid 
given on the tor.gue; acts on the Blood and Glands, ex- 
pels the poisonous germs from the body. Cures Distem- 
per in Dogs and Sheep and Cholera in Poultry. Largest 
selling live stock remedy. Cures La Grippe among human 
beings and is a fine Kidney remedy. 5oc. and $1 a bottle; 
$5 and $10 a dozen. Cut this out. Keep it. Show to your 
druggist, who will get it for you. Free Booklet, "Distem- 
per, Causes and Cures." 

BPOHN MEDICAL CO., ClicmlxtH and Bacteriologist*, 
Goahen, ind., r. s. A, 

The Stallion Number 



-OF THE- 



BREEDER AND SPO RTSMAN 

Will be Issued Feb. 26,'10 

Pedigrees Tabulated 



AT THIS OFFICE. 



BEST GREEN TROTTER IN THE 

STATE FOR SALE. 

BUSTER — fills the bill in every re- 
spect. Sired by Neernut 2:12%; dam by 
Nelson 2:03y 4 . For price and particu- 
lars, address G. W. PARSONS, 

Highland. Cal. 

HIGH-CLASS TROTTERS 

FOR SALE 

Geo. T. Beckers of Los Angeles offers all his 
broodmares snd young Zombros for 

sale as he will go East this spring to again 
place Zombro in the stud, and if they are 
not sold before he leaves he will sell them 
over there. He has some royally bred ones. 
Write him for pedigrees and prices. 
Address 
CEO. T. BECKERS, 

3727 South Figueroa St.. Los Angeles. 

FOR SALE OR LEASE. 

KINNEY H., three-year-old stallion 
by Kinney Rose 2:13%, a son of Mc- 
Kinney 2:11)4; dam Leta H. by Nut- 
wood Wilkes. Kinney H. is a splendid 
young horse in every respect, hand- 
some, intelligent, good disposition and 
very promising. With his breeding and 
individuality, he is one of the most 
desirable grandsons of McKinney in 
this part of the State. 

For further particulars, call or ad- 
dress CHRIS HASHAGEN, 

2801 Mil St., San Franciaco. 

CHESTNUT TOM 43488 FOR SALE. 

I want to sell my stallion Chestnut 
Tom 2:15, as I am now engaged in busi- 
ness and cannot give him my attention. 
He is by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, sire of 
John A. McKerron 2:04 hi, the fastest 
trotting stallion in America, and of 
Copa de Oro 2:01%, the fastest pacing 
heat winner of 1909. His dam, Zeta 
Carter, is by Director 2:17, and his 
grandam Lida W. 2 :18 V4 Is by Nut- 
wood 2:18%, and is the dam of four In 
the list. Chestnut Tom is the sire of 
Louise Carter, three-year-old record 
2:24, the only one of his get ever 
trained. Chestnut Tom was foaled In 
1898, is a very strong and vigorous 
horse, and will be a sure sire of speed 
if given an opportunity. 

For price and further particulars, ad- 
dress GEO. T. ALGEO, 
3804 Piedmont Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

Chestnut gelding, foaled 1905, by 
Monterey 2:09*4, dam Theresa 2:14 by 
Silver Bow, second dam Laura Wilkes 
2:17 by Guy Wilkes 2:15%, third dam 
by Stelnway 2:25. Stands 15.2% hands 
high and weighs 1100 pounds. Power- 
fully built, always in good flesh, a nat- 
ural born pacer, perfectly gaited, wears 
light shoes, no straps or boots of any 
kind, and with only 7 months' training 
in all, on the 24th day of last August 
paced a mile in 2:08 flat, last half in 
1:02, last quarter in 29 seconds. The 
performances of this horse have been 
kept under cover and nobody knows his 
speed. If he is not a two-minute 
pacer, there never was one, and my 
only reason for selling is that I need 
the money. This horse is guaranteed 
sound, good-headed and game. 

Also, a beautiful blooded bay car- 
riage gelding, 5 years old, 16 hands 
high, weighs 1150 pounds, standard 
bred. Can trot a 2:30 gait. Handsome, 
guaranteed sound and safe for a lady 
to drive among cars and automobiles. 

Apply to or address H. HANSEN, 
1420 46th Ave., Melrose, Cal. 

FOR SALE 

Nearest 2:22 

Sire of 

Highfly 2:04 l 4 , Alone 2:09 „ 
Trueheart 2:19^, Joe Cans 2A9}4, 
Just It (3-year-old) Zi\9%, 
and brother to John A. McKerron 2:04%, second 
fastest stallion in the world. 

Nearest is \b% hands high, weight 1200 pounds. 
This horse is a sure foal getter and is in splendid 
condition. 

Address. MRS. S. V. BARS TOW, 

1042 Alameda Ave., San Jose, Cal. 



WHEN 
DOCTORS 
DISAGREE 




— or at Any other time, 
use Renuall'a Spavin 
Cure to cure that 
Spavin. Curl i, RlnfrUone, Splint, 
Bony Growth or any other lameness. It's the 
safest way. Keep a bottle of 

KENDALL'S 
SPAVIN CURE 

on hand so you can use It promptly. 

"Please send me one of your books, 'Treatise 
on the Horse.' I have been uslnp Kendall* 
Spavin Cure foryearsand find It a sure cure for 
Spavin, Ringbone. Splint and Lameness. 

W. M. Slnglr, Perbam, Minn.* 

Good for man and beast. Your druftfrlnt will 
supply vou. PricaSl OO per bottle: 6 for $5. 00. 
Also ask him for that valuable book, "Treatise 
on the Horse,"or wrltedlrect for a copy. Address 
DR. B. J. KENDALL CO.. Enosburft Falls, Vt 



Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. Complicated cases treated suc- 
cessfully. Calls from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

The beat work at reaaonaDie prleea 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL. 

620 Ootavia St., between Fulton and Oroya. 
Phone Special 2074. San Praneieeo, Cal. 

GLIDE BROTHERS 

Successors to J. H. Glide & Sons. 
8ole Proprietors of the 
FAMOUS BLACOW- ROBERTS-GLIDE 
FRENCH MERINO SHEEP. 

Glide Grade— 7-8 French and 1-8 Spanish Merino 
—Thoroughbred Shropshire Rams- 
Rams for sale at all times. 
P. O. Box 215. Telephone and telegraph. 
Dixon. Cal. Address. Dixon. Cal. 

PEDIGREED FOX HOUNDS. 

All guaranteed, broke dogs and pups. 400 red 
fox cubs. Price list. 

J. D. 8TODGHILL, ShelDyyllle Ky. 



GOOD FISHING 

and pleasure boating on the Mann shore at 
Tiburon and vicinity. Fishing Tackle to let and 
Bait always on hand. First-class boats at reas- 
onable prices. 

San Francisco Boat House, 

Capt. F. Wm. Ehrke, Prop., Tiburon. Cal. 
Good ferry service from foot of Market 8t.. 



Blake, Moffit & Towne 

Dealer, in PAPER 

1400-1450 4th St., San Franciaco, Cal. 

Blake, Mofflt & Towne. Los Angeies. 
Blake. McFall & Co.. Portland, ore. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY, 

High-Class Art in 
HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 
Artiatic Deaigning 
141 Valencia St., San Franciaco 

RUBEROID ROOFING. 

Weather Proof. Acid Proof, Fire itesisiing. 
BONESTELL & CO. 
118 to 124 Fint St., San Franciaco. Cal. 



MOBS" 



SEND 
FOR 



Our New 
CATALOG 

Beautifully Illustrated - FREE 




C. C. MORSE & CO. 

Seeds - Plants - Trees 
'Jackson St. San Francisco 



"NESTOB" "IMPOBTED" "B07AL 1713T0B" 




The Original Egyptian " 



Shoe Boils, Capped 

Hock, Bursitis 
are hard to cure, yet 



RBINE 



Aflso 




will remove them and leave no blem- 1 
lshi Does not blister or remove' 
the hnlr. Cures any puff or swelling. Horse cud 
be worked. ». ■ " per bottle.dellvered.Book S D free. 

ABSORBING. JR., (mankind, (1.00 bnttle.) 
For Bolls, Kruises, Old Sores, Swellings, Cloitre. 
Varicose Veins, Varicosities. Allays Pain. 
W. F. VOUNG, P. 0. F., 54 Temple St., Springfield, Mags. 

For Sale by— Langley & Michaels, Ban Fran- 
cisco, Cal.; Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore ; F. w. Braun Co., Los Angeles, Cal.; 
Western Whosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal.; Kirk, Geary & Co., Sacramento, Cel.; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.) Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 



Saturday, January 22, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



California Breeders Association 

Canfield - Clark Stakes No. 1 

To be raced under the auspices of the California Breeders Association 
for foals of 1908 to be raced as 2-year-olds in 1910. 

Entries to close February 1, '10. 

$ 1 000 Guaranteed Purse for Trotters 

ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS. 

Feb. 1, '10, $10; June 1, '10, $15; final payment, $25, ten days before the 
meeting begins at which the race is to be trotted. Nothing additional from 
money winners. 



CONDITIONS. 



Mile heats, 2 in 3. Distance, 150 yards. Entry must be accompanied by 
entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment 
forfeits all previous payments. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these stakes in case the number of 
entries received is not satisfactory. 

Money divided 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. 

Write for entry blanks and further information to 



C. A. CANFIELD, President. 



WM. Ij. JAMES, Secretary, 
317 West 17th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ZOMBRO 2:11, 



The Great Sire of Trotters, 

SSSSS8SSS8SSSSSSS8SSSSSSSSSSSS888S8S 



Will be in the stud at 



Los Angeles until April 1, 1910 



TERMS: $100 to insure. Money refunded if mare proves not in foal. 

ZOMBRO has 14 new standard performers for 1909, 12 new ones in 2:20, 7 in 
2:15 and 2 in 2:10. Ten of his get reduced their records in 1909. He now has 59 
standard performers, of which 39 have records of 2:20 or better, 22 have records 
of 2:15 or better, and 9 have records of 2:10 or better. No other horse living ever 
made such a showing except Zombro's sire, McKinney. Get a Zombro while you 
have the opportunity. Address GEO. T. BECKERS, 

3727 South FIgueroa St., Los Angeles, Cal. 




Registered Trade Mark " « 

SPAVIN CURE 



As they 
sometimes are 



As "Save-the-Horse" 
can make them 





There lire no baneful and vicious fea- 
tures attending the use of "•Save-the- 
Horse." 

With it you have a definite and abso- 
lutely permanent recovery and one 
whfeh shall stand the scrutiny of the 
infallible eye of the veterinarian or ex- 
pert and all endurance tests. 

You obtain results without delays, 
relapses, blistering, fevered, swollen 
and permanently thickened tissue or 
sunnended use of the horse. 




Grattan Stock Farm 
• home of grattan 

Prairie View.Ij,1«. 



PRA1RIK VIEW, 111., November 1, 1909. 
Troy Chemical Co., Blnghamton. N. T.: 

Gentlemen: I wish to get advice in regard to a lame horse owned by a 
friend of mine who has been looking to me for information. I am superintendent 
of the above-named farm and have in the last two years used a number of bottles 
of your remedy. It has proven satisfactory in every instance, and I believe it has 
no equal on the market. I am quite a little interested in helping this party and 
any information you can give me regarding the possibility of a cure will be appre- 
ciated. The horse, etc. Most truly, W. WINTKRSTEIN. 

JIOKFKRSON, Okla., Nov. 16, 1909. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. Y.: 

Dear Sirs: I have a mare with bog 
spavin on both hind legs. I have used 
"Save-the- Horse" on bone spavins and 
growths on bone. I wisli you would let 
me know if it will cure a bog spavin. 
I had this old trotter, Capt. Brocket 
2:13; lie was stove in the front ankle, 
there was a leakage of the Joint the 
same as a bone spavin. His Joints 
were enlarged big enough for two 
Joints. I fired him and got no results. 
I then used "Save-the-Horse' and he 
is now soun 1. If your "Save-the-Horse" 
will act the same on bog spavin, let me 
know. Our druggist has It on hand, 
and I will try a bottle. Yours respect- 
fully, J. S. STREETS. 

"Save-the-Horse" permanently cures 
bone and bog spavin, ringbone (except 
low rinsbone), curb, thoroughpln. splint, 
'lice boil, windpuff, inlured tendons, 
an l all lameness, without scar or loss 
of hair. Horse may work as usual. 
Send for copy and booklet. 
85.00 per bottle, with o written guaran- 
tee as binding to protect you as the 
best legal talent could make It. 
At Druggists and Dealers or Express 
Paid. 

TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
Blnghamton, N. Y. 
D. E. Newell. 
Mi Bayo Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 
1108 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



California Breeders Association 

Canfield - Clark Stakes No, 2 

To he raced under the auspices of the California Breeders Association 
for fosls of 1909 to be raced as 2-year-olds in 1911. 

Entries to close February 1, '10. 

$ 1 000 Guaranteed Purse for Trotters 



ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS. 



Feb. 1, '10, $5; Nov. 1, '10, $10; April 1, '11, $10; final payment, $25, 

ten days before the meeting begins at which the race is to be trotted. Noth- 
ing additional from money winners. 



CONDITIONS. 



Mile heats, 2 in 3. Distance, 150 yards. Entry must be accompanied by 

entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment 
forfeits all previous payments. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen this stake in case the number of 
entries received is not satisfactory. 

Money divided 50, 25, 15 and io per cent. 

Write for entry blank and further information to 



C. A. CANFIELD, PreHldent. 



VVM. L. JAMES, Secretary, 
317 West 17th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



PALITE 45062 



A Sire of Early Speed. 



^irP Nlltwnn.fi WillpC ?"fni sireof Copa de Oro 2M l A. John A. McKerron 2M%. etc.. and 
OIIC, MUITTUUU niir.CS 4.IU 2 , dams of San Francisco 2 :(T,%, Mona Wilkes 2 :03^. etc. 

Ham Palita (1\ ?*ln dam of 2 in list: second dam Elsie, dam of 5; third dam Elaine 2:20, 
I/am, ran la yi. j ,] am of 4; fourth dam Green Mountain Maid, dam of 9. 

PALITE is the sire of the 2-year-old stake winner Pal 2:17%. and of the 3-year-old tilly Com- 
plete, second to the Occident Stake winner El Volante in 2:13%, and timed separately in 2:14%. Pa- 
lite is one of the best bred stallions of the Wilkes-Electioneer cross living. His colts are all trotters, 
good gaited and determined. 

He will make the season of 1910 at the ranch of the undersigned at 

DIXON, CAL. Terms: $40 for the Season ^Rg^^&F^"™ 

Good pasturage at $2.50 per month and best of care taken of mares, but no responsibility as- 
sumed for accidents or escapes. 

For further particulars address 

E. D. DUDLEY, (Owner). Dixon, Cal. 

glO Due on Two-Year-Olds 

Tuesday, Feb. 1, '10. 

$7,250— Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 8 

PACIFIC COAST TROTTING HORSE BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 

Foals Born 1908 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 
ENTRIES CLOSED DECEMBER 2, 1907. 

$4,250 for Trotting Foals. $1750 for Pacing Foals. $800 to Nominators 
of Dams of Winners and $450 to Owners of Stallions. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



$3000 for Three- Year-Old Trotters. 
200 for Nominator on whose entry Is 

named the Dnm of Winner of 

Three-Yenr-Old Trot. 
1250 for Two-Year-Old Trotters. 
200 for Nominator on whose entry Is 

named the Dam of Winner of 

Two-Year-Old Trot. 
100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of 

Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot 

when inure was bred. 



$1000 for Three-Year-Old Pacera. 

200 for Nominator on whose entry Is 

nnmed the Dam of Winner of 

Three- Year-Old Pace. 
750 for Two-Year-Old Pacers. 
200 for Nominator on whose entry la 

named the Dam of Winner of 

Two-Year-Old Pace. 
100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of 

Winner of Three- Year-Old Pace 

when mare was bred. 



$250 in Special Prizes was Paid to Stallion Owners. 

$10 on Two-Year-Olds February 1. 1910; $10 on Three- Year-Olds February 1. 1911. 

STARTING PAYMENTS — $25 to start In the Two-Year-Old Pace; 935 to start In 
the Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Three-Year-Old Pace; $50 to 
start in the Three-Year-Old Trot. All Starting Payments to be made ten days 
before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominators muNt deslgnute when making payments to start whether the horse 
entered Is n Trotter or Pacer. 

Colts that start at two years old are not barred from starting again In the three- 
year-old divisions. 

Be Sure to Make This Payment. 



E. P. HEALD, I ns 



F. W. KELLEY, Sec y, 

866 Pacific Hid)?., San Francisco 



Jim Logan 



Rag. No. 44997. 




J. E. MONTGOMERY, 



Champion 3 yojr-old Pacer of the World. 
Record 2:05' .. In third heat. 

Sired by Chas. Derby 4907 (sire of 9 In 2:10 list; sons sired Sir 
Alberts. 2:0o% Sir lohn S. 2:0% Mona Wilkes 2:04% etc.. etc.); 
dam Kllii! Logan (dam of Sir Albert S. 2:0:i>4. Jim Logan CD 
2:0554. Dan I-orbii (Mat.) 2:12%) by Durfee 11226 (sire of Shecan 
2 :12H. etc.) ; second dam Itipple by Prompter: third dam Grace 
by Hnccaneer. 

Jim Logan stands IB hands 1 inch. He is sound and a splen- 
did individual, (iood disposition and unexcelled breeding. 

Season of 1910 at 

PLEAS ANTON, Cal. 

(Limited numbor of marea.) 
FEE: $50 for the Season 

$10 returned if mare fails to get In foal. Money due when mare if 
served, tiood pasturage at $T> per month. Best of care taken of 
mares, but no responsibility assumed. 

Ship marcs via Southern Pacific or Western Pacific. 

- - - Plaasanton, Cal. 



Take the Breeder and Sportsman. 



u 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1910. 



X\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\N\N\V\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\N\\\\\\\\\\ WWW WW WWW WW NAN \\\\\\\\\\ \ \N\\X%%3SJ8S3S38X3i3aWOCS%%X«^X 

I A Whirlwind Finish! 

Mr. Woolfolk Henderson, of Lexington, Ky., who lias made an unprecedented record during tlie year 1909, shot at Houston, Texas, 

December 20-21', with the following results: 



High Amateur Average, 



800 x 825. 



Longest Run, Unfinished, 



252 Straight. High Gun, Last Day, . 274 x 275 



At this shoot Mr. Henderson used the same load in 



PETERS SHELLS 

that he has shot throughout the year. Hia scores are an eloquent witness to the shooting efficiency of these goods. See a little later 

advertisement for full particulars. 



THE PETERS CARTRIDGE COMPANY, CINCINNATI, 0. 



New York: 08 Chamber* St.. T. H. Keller, Mgr. 

San Francisco: II0S-IS12 Howard St., J. S. French, Mgr. 

New Orleans: 321 Magailne St., J. W. Osborne, Mgr. 



The Annual Short -Horn Sales 



MRS. J. H. GLIDE will be held 
w January 24, 1910 

The Greenwood offering comprises 

25 head yearling and two-year-old bulls, 1 5 head choice 
cows and heifers, 

including first prize winners at Alaska-Yukon-Exposition. 




HOWARD CATTLE CO., win be hew 

January 25, 1910 

The Howard Cattle Company offering comprises 

35 head yearling and two-year-old bulls, 20 head choice 
heifers. 

Offering includes sons of the twice grand Champion of America 
Lavender Viscount 124755; also bulls strong in the blood of 
the. champion Choice (ioods 18(5X02. 



These Offerings Exceed in Number and Equal in Quality the Banner Sale of 1909. 
In Sales Pavilion of FRED. H. CHASE & CO., 478 Valencia St., San Francisco. 

For catalogue and further particulars apply to 
MRS. J. H. GLIDE, 910 H. St., Sacramento, Cal. HOWARD CATTLE CO., till Mission St., San Francisco, Cal 



$5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



THE— 



State Fair Futurity Stakes No. 2 

Foals of Mares Covered in 1909 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 

$2850 for Trotting Foals. $2150 for Pacing Foals. 



$5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



TO BE GIVEN BY THE 



CALIFORNIA STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, Sacramento, Cal. 

Entries to close February 1, '10. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when 

mare was bred. 

FOR TWO-YEAR-OLDS to take place at the California State Fair, 1912 

Two-Year-Old Trotters, • • ■ $600 
Two-Year-Old Pacers, ... 400 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when 

mare was bred. 

FOR THREE-YEAR-OLDS to take place at the California State Fair, 1913 

Three-Year-Old Trotters, • • ■ $1400 
Three-Year-Old Pacers, • • • $1100 



Consolations for Horses That Started in Above and Won No Money. 

ENTRANCE FREE— Otherwise same conditions to govern as in the main events. 

T\\ <>-■» F. VK-OI.I) TROTTERS, *:!.-.(>; TWO-YEAR-OLD PACERS, fario. THREE- YEAR-OLD TROTTERS, MOO; THREE- YEAR-OLD PACERS, *:«M>. 

KXTIIANPE AM) PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on February 1, 1910. when name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 July 1, 1910; 
$5 December 1, 1910; $10 on yearlings February 1, 1911; $10 on two-year-olds February 1, 1912; $10 on three year olds February 1, 1913. 

STAHTI\(i PAYMENTS — $15 to start in the two-year-old pace. $25 to start in the two-year-old trot; $35 to start in the three-year-old pace; $50 to start in the 
the three-year-old trot. All starting payments t<> be made ten days before the first day of the State Fair, at which the race is to take place. 

No additional fiitrance imII be charged In the Connotation Makes. 

Nominators must designate when milking payments to start whether the horse entered is a Trotter or I'aeer. 
Colts that start at two years old are not barred from starting again In the three-year-old divisions. 

CONDITIONS. 

The races for two-year-olds will be mile heats, two in three, and for three-year-olds, three in five. Distance for two-year-olds. 150 yards; for three-year-olds, 

100 yards. 

If a mare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins, or if either the mare or foal dies before February I. 1011, her nominator may sell or transfer his 
nomination or substitute another mure or foal, regardless of ownership: but there will lie no return of a imminent, nor will any entry he liable for more than amount 
paid in or con true ted for. In entries, the name, color nnd pedigree of mare must be given; nlso the name of the horse to which site was bred In 10O1I. 

Entries must be accompanied by the entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $5000, the amount of 
the guarantee, only. Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacing divisions. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactory to the Board of Directors. 
Races for Two-Year-Old Stake and Consolation end with the conclusion of tlte third heat. 
Races for Three-Year-Old Stake and Consolation end with the conclusion of fifth heat. 

Money divided In each division of the Stake 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division than there are starters. 

All contestants not winning a heat in three or awarded second position twice will be retired from the race, but do not forfeit their winnings as shown by the 

summary. 

Entries open to the world. 

AVrlte for EMry Blanks to 

H. A. JASTRO, President. J. A. FILCHER, Sec'y, Sacramento, Cal. 

Other than exceptions made in this entry blank rules of National Trotting Association to govern. 



Saturday, January 22, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



It 



GOLCHER BROS. 

(Formerly of Clabrough . Golcher & Co.) 




Fine Fishing Tackle, Guns, Sporting and Outing Goods 
Phone Temporary 1883. 5 |Q Mafket §| Sa „ ffanCiSCO 



MANUFACTURERS 
»I° OUTFITTERS 
for the I 
SPORTSMAN 
CAMPER**? 
ATHLETE. 



EQUIPMENT 
•« APPARATUS 



(pmpanu J ev ery ne 



48-53 GEARY ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EV ERY NE ED. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
SUPPLIES. 



PHIL. B. BEKEART CO., 

SOLE PACIFIC COAST BRANCH 



No Stock Carried. 
Goods Sold to the Trade Only. 



For various manufacturers of Fire Arms, Sporting Goods, 
ami Fishing Tackle. 

San Francisco, Gal. 



Piece 




Our new "3-Bolt. 3-I'iece l'J09 Model Gun has the simplest and fastest lock ever 
Mit In a gun. Some makers claim a three-piece lock, but do not show or count the 
main spring— now. we both show and count the main spring— see cut above 
Please note we have cut out all cocking bars, levers and push rods and hook right 
on to the toe of the hammer. This not only makes a lock with large strong parts 
but a lock that works as smooth as oil. 

We use an unbreakable coil top lever spring, also a coil main spring which 
acts directly on the hammer, and a horizontal sear, which makes a very fast lock 
with a quick, clean, sharp and snappy pull. 

Send for art i'atalog and special prices. lSgrades, $17.75 net to $.100 list. 
Pac Coast liranch— Phil. B. Hekeart Co.. 717 Market St., San Francisco 

ITHACA GUN CO. 



Dept. 15, 



Ithaca, N. Y. 



75 PER CENT 



OF ALL HORSE OWNERS 

AND TRAINERS 



USE AND RECOMMEND 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE FOOT REMEDY 



-SOLD BY- 




Sol. I), ills, I, San Frnnelaco, Cnl. 

Pierce Cotlcr Co Los Angeles, Cat. 

R. Grant Potter Sacramento, Cal. 

Miller & Patterson San Diego, Cal. 

J. (i. Head & Bro Ogden, Utah 

E. H. Iri*h Butte, Mont. 

A. A. Kraft Co Spokane, Wash. 

Tlion. M. Henderson Seattle, Wash. 

C. Rodder Stockton, Cal. 

VV m . E. Detels IMeasanton, Cal. 

V. Koch . San Jose, Cal. 

Keystone Rroa. .... .San Francisco, Cal. 

Fred Heedy Fresno, Cal. 

Jno. McKerron San Fraaclsco, Cal. 

Jos. Mc'ligne Son Francisco, Cal. 

Tlryilon llros I.os Angeles, Cal. 



Guaranteed under the Food and Drags 
Ai-t, June 30, MMIrl. >erlol Number 1219. 



JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison Street, Chicago. 

ROSS McMAHON 



Awning and Tent Co. 

Camp Furniture, Awnings, Hammocks and Covers in stock and to order. 
Flags and Banners. 



Phone Kearny 2030. 



403 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



1909 STATE SHOOTS 

THE CHAMPIONSHIPS of the following States won with 



i 



oU PON! 



SMOKELESS POWDERS 



( iolorado 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Kentucky 

M ichigan 

Mississippi 

Maine 

New Jersey 



North Carolina 
New York 
Ohio 

Pennsylvania 
South Dakota 
Texas 
Virginia 
Washington 
West Virginia 



THE HIGH AVERAGE 

in all program events at the following State shoots won with 




SMOKELESS POWDERS 



Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Michigan 

Mississippi 



New York 
North Carolina 
North Dakota 
Ohio 

( Iklahoma 

Pennsylvania 

Vermont 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wyoming 




The Most Popular Powders in the World. 
The "Regular and Reliable" Brands. 



A Good Start for the New Year. 



On the grounds of the North Kentucky Gun Club, Dec. 
31, 1900, Mr. Frank Alkire scored 49 x 50 live pigeons, at a 
distance of from 32 to 33 yards. Messrs. John A. Payne ($ 
Ggo. Walker scored 48 x 50 at the same long distance. 

Jan. I, 19K), in the Tri-State Championship Match, at 
live pigeons, Messrs. (Jen. Walker and John Schrecfe tied on 
25 straight. On the shoot-off Mr. Walker won, scoring 10 
straight, winning the championship of < >hio, Kentucky and 
Indiana. 

These gentlemen all shot PARKEB (inns. It is a not- 
able fact that the Tri-State Championship has been won con- 
tinuously by the PARKER <!iin, since its inauguration. 



PARKER BROS., 



Meriden, Conn, 



New York Salesrooms, 32 Warren St. 



nreeLwged ttorsefrv 

urn nnl KiirtnullllUl hv IIIIV lllfllllH. TIlB COUntTV Ifl full tlf tllPtll. Th<' V ^ 



j by any means. The country is full of them. The 
> all rijrht but It Is not worth tin y thin? because of a curb, X 



uro not curiosities b 

fourth leg Is there —. , 

splint, spavin or other hke bunch. You can cure the horse of any of these % 

ailments and put another sound leg under him by the use of \ 

Quinn's Ointment* 1 

It Ik i iiiii' tried and reliable. Whi'n a hOIM Incurod 
with (Julnn's Ointment ho Htavs cured. Mr. K. K. tturke 
of SprlnKtleld, Mo., writes an follows: "I have been 
iinliiK Quinn's Olnlmsnl forievenil year* and hare er- 
rectcd litany miirvolnua cured; It will ko deeper and* 
caunc lens pain than any blister I ever used. Thought 
It mv duty lor the benefltof horses to recommend your 
Ointment, lam never without It " This Is the (.-enernl 
verdict hv all w ho R-lvfl Quinn's Olnlmsnl a trial. For 
curbs, B|illnt8,»pavlnn. wlndpull>. and all bunches it 
Is uncqualed. Pries % 1 psr bollls at all drUKirlsts 



UT s« Dt by ntnll. Send fo 



testimonials, Ac. 



W. B. Eddy A Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 



Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 



16 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 22, 1910. 



Fine 

Harness... 




Tbe Best Horse Boots 

'Hne Harness 

"ORSE BOOTS 



The only 
Manufacturer 
of 

Horse Boots 

on the 
Pacific Coast. 






Shoot the Shells With Steel 
Protection Around the Smokeless Powder. 



You get that protection in U. M. C. Arrow and Xitro Club brands which are the only shells made in America lined with steel. Yet you pay 
no more than you do for the unlined makes. 

It will pay you to buy your shells carefully, for the Steel Lining does several very important things: It keeps out the moistuie, protects the 
gun and the shooter because it makes the shell stronger ami safer, and improves the shooting in every way. 

1909 U. M. C. Came Laws & Guide Directory Free. 
THE UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., Bridgeport, Conn. Agency, 315 Broadway, New York City. 




WINCHESTER 



Guns and Ammunition. 


"THEY NEVEF 


I FAILED ME." -HARRY WHITNEY 


From the frozen north as well 


as from sunn 


y Africa comes more enduring praise for the entire reliability of Winchester 



(inns and Ammunition — the Red W Brand. Harry Whitney, who recently returned from the Arctic, where he spent 
fourteen months and hunted farther North and achieved greatei success than any sportsman ever did before, wisely 
pinned his faith to the Red W combination. He says of it: 

"I used two Winchesters: A Model '95 .30-40 and a .22 Automatic and Winchester Cartridges with both. 
Neither the extreme cold nor rough handling affected their working or accuracy. They never failed me." 

THE EQUIPMENT OF MEN OF ACHIEVEMENT. 




SHOT 




In the Marsh or Field 

Selby Loads 

Get the Limit 
Ask the Shooter Who KNOWS! 



SELBY SMELTING & LEAD CO., 



San Francisco, Cal. 



VOLUME LVI. No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 1910. 



Subscription— $3.00 Per Year. 




! 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1910. 



Sensational Announcement 

FOR THE PLEASANTON SALE 

Owing to his continued illness, Mr. Frank J. Kilpatrick consigns his six great three-year-old stallions which he brought here last year, viz: 



BLACK HALL by Ozono (son of Nloko) out of Maggie Yeazer, 

dam of Walnut Hall 2:08|, etc. 
OLIVER TODD by Todd 2:Uf, out of Olive Brady by Cyclone. 

MOKO HALL by Walnut Hall 2:08 ',, out of a mare by Moko; sec- 
ond dam by Simmons 2:28, etc. 



GOVERNOR CONST ANTINE by Constants 2:I2£, out of 

Nevada by Onward 2:05i, etc. 
GERALD JAY by the great sire Jay Bird, out of Black Annie by 
Bourbon Wilkes, etc. 

GRANT CONST ANTINE by Constantine l:\U, out of Viva- 
cious 2:17 by Bernal 2:24, etc. 



Besides These Royally Bred Ones There Will Be at Least 

80 Others of the Choicest Bred in California. 

Good Horses Bring Big Prices at Pleasan ton ! 

THIS 18 THE LAST NOTIFICATION", FOB 

Entries to this Great Sale will close Tuesday, Feb. 1. 

Horses will not l>e sold that arc not catalogued. From letters received from all parts of the Pacific Coast, 

as well as Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming, it seems 

Everybody will attend the Third Annual Pleasanton Sale 



OF STANDARD-BRED 



TROTTERS and PACERS The First Week in March, 1910 



BESIDES THE ABOVE THERE WILL BE OFFERED 

descendants of McKinney 2:11'/4, Diablo 2:09' 4- Boodle 2:12i/ 2 . Altamont 2:26, 
Whips 2:27' /4 , Nushagak, Monicrat 2:13|/ 2 , Zombro 2:11, Searchlight 2:03|^, 
Easter W., The Limit, Guy Wilkes 2:15' /4 , Athablo 2:24 l 4 , Dexter Prince, De- 
monio 2:1114, Lecco 2:09%, Monterey 2:09\/ 4 , Silver Bow 2:16, Sir John (trial 
2:14) by McKinney 2 : 1 1 ! 4 . Strathway 2:19, Monbells 2:23, Kinney Lou 2:07%, 
Zolock 2:05 l 4, Alconda Jay, Prince Lovelace, Baron Bowles (3) 2:25, Peveril by 
Alaric, McKenna (son of McKinney 2:11^), Clay S. 2:16, Palite (sire of Pal 
2:17'/ 2 ), Demonio 2:1114, Chas. Derby 2:20, Bayswater Wilkes, Dawnlight, 
Nutwood Wilkes 2:16! 4 , Dictatus 2:17, Strathway 2:19, Mendocino 2:19 '/g. 



FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF CONSIGNEES: 

Frank J. Kilpatrick, San Francisco; C. L. Crellin, Pleasanton; Henry Struw, 
Watsonville; J. B. Montgomery, Pleasanton; Estate of F. P. Hellwig, Alvarado; 
J. C. Armstrong, A. Goulart. Santa Rita; A. Edstrom, Oakland; H. Busing, 
Pleasanton; S. B. Van Dervoort, Irvington; Frank M. Gray, Los Gatos; Rush & 
Haile, Suisun; M. C. Kcefer, Woodland; James J. Morrisey, Oakland, Cal.; A. R. 
Shreve, Portland, Ore.; C. E. Brunbauger, T. C. Wallic, of Los Banos; Harry 
McFadyen, of Dixon; Win. Hendrickson, San Jose; Est. of Dr. C. F. Millar, 
Dixon; T. D. Sexton, Oakland; H. Scott, San Jose; etc. 

Owners of good "prospects" who wish to get the very high< st prices for 
them can make no nrstake in consigning them to this sale immediately, as 
entries close February 1st, and a limited number can only be sold. Send for 
entry blanks. 



There never was such an aggregation of royally bred stallions, broodmares, colts and fillies, as well as some of the greatest rac- 
ing prospects and matinee horses, ever offered at auction in California. 

We Promised to have a big sale and we will keep that Promise. 

Consignments of heavy Draft Horses solicited, to be sold at the conclusion of this sale. 

FRED H. CHASE & CO., AUCTIONEERS, 478 Valencia St., San Francisco. 



DISTILLED 



jfernloc 

tM^-NAME REGISTCRED- / ^^Sv7^%^' PATENTED, APRIL 21 1908- 

^aaa>^ /A 



EXTRACT 




Adam G. with Chas. De Ryder Up. 



" Hemlock is without 
question the be9t body 
and leg wash yet offered 
to horsemen. It is also 
a superior liniment. 

( ii as. DB Kyukr." 




" I think it a per- 
fect leg wash and lo- 
tion. 

E. F. Geeks." 



FERNLOC is Nature's Greatest Body Wash and Liniment. 
Contains 20 per cent. Grain Alcohol. 



It always 

Increases Speed, Stimulate* 
and Strengthens, Producing 
Staying Qualities. 



It always 

Induces a Healthy Circulation. 
Prevents Congestion, Chills and 
Colds. 



It always removes Soreness, Rheumatism, Inflammation and .Stiffness from muse],' 

and tendons. 



KKRNLOC does not Stain or Blister. It produces a Smooth. Healthy. Skin and Hair. 
" YOU CANNOT USE IT WRONG." 



One Gal. Jugs. $3. Five Gal. Jugs. $10. Half Barrel and Barrels. $1.50 per Gal. 
Ask for books and circulars giving full information and directions. 



ni: \ i f.iis u no -ki.i. rr,n m.oc. 

J. <;. Head A Broa Oaden, Utah 

Jenkins a. i»r«> Sail Lake City, Utah 

E. II. Irish Unite. Moat. 

o. it. Etfeatoe Spokane, Waaa. 

Hoaka Harness Co Tacoaaa, Wnah. 

T. M. HenderMon Seattle, Wash. 

Ki ii. i- Harneaa Co Portland, Ore. 

M. ii. Harris Saddlery Co Haryarllle, Cal. 

It. Grant Potter Sacramento, Cal. 

W. E. Detela Pleaaanton, Cal. 

.1. A. Lewis Denver, Colo. 

W. .1. Kenney San Kranclaeo, Cal. 

Bojdrn Hros Los \ncrlc«, Cal. 

Lovett Drag ( « Phoenix, Arlir.. 

Weal Texas Saddle Co BJ Paso, Texan 

Manufactured by 

THE FORESTINE COMPANY, 

Williamsport, Pa. 



Saturday, January 29, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPOR^MAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 

r. W. KELLEY. Proprietor. 
a 

Turf and Sporting Authority of tho Pacific Coast. 
OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACIFIC BUILDING, 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco Post-Office. 



Terms— One Year. $3; Six Months. $1.75; Three Months. $1. 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley. P. O. Drawer 447. San Francisco. Calif. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name 
and address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private 
guarantee of good faith. 



STALLIONS ADVERTISED. 

BODAKER 49130 Thos. Ronan. Pleasanton 

DEMONIO 2:11% Rush & Haile, Suisun 

GEN. J. B. FRISBIE 41637 Rush & Haile, Suisun 

Jim Logan (3) 2:05%.. J. E. Montgomery, Pleasanton 

PALITE 45062 E. D. Dullev, Dixon 

ZOLOCK 2:05% N. S. Young, San Jose 

ZOMBRO 2:11 Geo. T. Beckers, Los Angeles 



LIMITING THE SEASON during which associa- 
tions, clubs or individuals may hold race meetings 
during the year is quite as legitimate as limiting 
the season during which game may be killed, and 
those legislatures which have passed laws placing 
limitations on racing have been sustained by the 
higher courts of their States. Kentucky for instance 
has a law which provides for a racing commission 
which assigns the dates on which associations may 
hold meetings and also provides that the betting 
must be done by the auction and mutual systems. 
The bookmakers at Latonia tried to give a meeting 
recently at which there was bookmaking, and sought 
to enjoin the racing commission from interfering 
with it, but the Supreme Court held that Kentucky's 
racing law was constitutional and must be obeyed. 
We believe the Kentucky law limits each association 
to twelve days of racing. Some such a law is needed 
in California and the horsemen and livestock breed- 
ers of the State should unite to secure its passage. 
Those were pleasant and profitable weeks to the 
farmers and stock breeders of California when there 
were some twenty or thirty district fairs given in 
the State during the summer and fall months, at 
which in addition to fine displays of all the products 
of each district there was a week of racing to pro- 
vid amusement for those who attended. There were 
running, trotting and pacing races for good purses, 
and there was a thoroughly enjoyable good time. 
That was before the advent of bookmaking with its 
atendant evil of continuous racing at one track for 
seven months in the year, until horse racing, once 
an honored sport, became so obnoxious to the peo- 
ple that they arose and demanded the total sup- 
pression of betting on races. The law passed failed 
to stop it however and it still goes on under a plan 
devised especially to evade the law. The thinking 
and reasoning lawmakers of other countries have 
long known that it is impossible to prohibit wagering 
on any sort of contests so long as those contests 
are permitted, and therefore have wisely concluded 
that the best means to prevent betting from becoming 
a great evil is to limit the days on which these 
contests are held. This is the sane and sensible 
plan and the one that California should adopt. Every 
horseman who resided in California twenty years 
ago will remember the spring and fall meetiics of 
the Pacific Coast Rlood Horse Association held in 
this city. Never lasting more than ten days and at- 
tended every day by the best people in the city, 
and from all parts of the Coast these meetings, with 
the State and district fairs, did all that was necessary 
to encourage the breeding of the thoroughbred, and 
the breeding farms of Palo Alto, J. B. Haggin, Chas. 
Boots, W. O'B. Macdonough and many others at- 
tained their greatest fame under that plan of racing. 
A few years after the continuous racing began here 
the great Rancho del Paso farm of Mr. Haggin was 
dispersed, and many others were reduced in size. 
The farmers throughout California lost interest in 
the breeding of the thoroughbred because they saw 
that this noble animal had been made into a gam- 
bling tool and they did not care to join in the game. 
California has permitted the sport of racing to get 
into the hands of the gamblers and it is now the 
duty of her citizens to rescue it from them. It can 
be done by limiting the days of racing of any asso- 
ciation and in any county to not over 20 days in one 



year and confining the betting to auction and mutual 
pools. The next Legislature should be asked by the 
farmers, the stock growers, the horse breeders and 
the business men of the State to pass such a law, 
and if these people will make a unanimous request to 
that effect it will doubtless be granted. 

o 

HORSE BREEDING IN EUROPE receives a great 
deal of attention from the governments which are 
growing more impressed every year with the neces- 
sity and importance of keeping up the supply of those 
types suitable for army work, as they know that in 
case of war the country short of horses is placed at 
a great disadvantage. A recent dispatch says: 
"Germany and France are the most advanced in this 
enterprise, although Austria has awakened to the 
necessity of a good supply of remounts and draught 
horses in the last year or two. Horse-breeding has 
been developed in Germany in two directions. The 
breeding of blooded horses for saddle and carriage 
has occupied a piece of importance in the Fatherland 
for many years. The principal center of this phase 
of horse-breeding is in the plains of North Germany. 
Not only does the government run its own farms, but 
private breeders are encouraged in every way to 
bring the German horses into the front rank of ex- 
cellence. There are twenty-three horse-breeding 
farms under the Prussian administration, controlled 
by the Minister of Agriculture, but directly managed 
by an official called the Oberlandstallmeister. From 
time to time these two government officers meet a 
Commission for the Promotion of National Horse- 
breeding and all questions affecting the improvement 
of the stock in Germany are discussed by experts. 
The regulations of this commission direct that as a 
requisite number of army horses is essential to the 
political independence of a large state care should be 
taken to place the breeding of army horses, on a 
secure footing, both in times of peace and war; also 
that the agricultural industry should be promoted by 
encouraging the breeding of draught horses. The 
steady aim of French horse-breeding schemes, al- 
though they have as their main object a supply for 
military purposes, has been to improve the horses 
employed in working the land or in commerce and 
industry. No less than $5,730,000 is spent every year 
in the improvement of French horses. A direct vote 
of $570,000 comes from the state, and the Pari 
Mutuel — or government system of betting at race 
courses — contributes a further $605,000. The re- 
mainder comes in the way of contributions from de- 
partment councils." 

o 

A CONVENTION OF HORSEMEN who are inter- 
ested in the breeding, training and racing of trot- 
ters and pacers has been called to meet in San Fran- 
cisco on Wednesday, March 2d. The call is issued 
by The San Francisco Driving Club of which Mr. W. 
J. Kenney of 531 Valencia street, this city, is presi- 
dent. The date set is the evening before the big 
March sale of harness horses at Pleasanton, and as 
that will be attended by harness horsemen from 
all over the Coast many of whom will have to pass 
through San Francisco on their way to Pleasanton, 
President Kenney believes the date will be oppor- 
tune for a large attendance. One of the principal 
objects of the convention will be the agitation of 
legislation favorable to harness racing at county and 
district fairs, and also to aid in the re-establishment 
of these fairs in California. Letters have been S( nt 
by President Kenney to horsemen all over the State 
and it is expected that there will be a large attend- 
ance and much good accomplished. The San Fran 
cisco Driving Club is one of the most energetic or- 
ganizations in California and its members have the 
faculty of pushing to a successful conclusion every 
proposition which receives the endorsement of a 
majority of its members. A round trip rate of one 
fare and a third has been secured for delegates to 
this convention. 

THE HARVESTER, that took a three-year-old 
record of 2:08% in 1908, and a four-year-old record 
of 2:06% last year, after which he trotted a mile 
in 2:03% in public is the subject of our front page 
picture this week, the original of which apjjeared in 
the Christmas Horse Review. The Harvester is by 
Walnut Hall 2:0814, dam by Moko, second dam by 
Simmons, and the three-year-old colt Moko Hall, 
which Mr. Frank .1. Kilpatrick has consigned to 
Chase's Pleasanton sale is bred exactly that way. 
They say he bears quite a remarkable resemblance; 
to The Harvester. 



THE NECESSITY of announcing racing programs 
early cannot be too strongly impressed on the driv- 
ing clubs and fair associations that intend giving 
race meetings this year on the main California cir- 
cuit. It is no more work to get out a program in 
February than it is in May or June, and the earlier 
these programs are announced the larger will be 
the entry lists. We have tried to impress this idea 
on the minds of the directors and other officials of 
the associations in California every year about this 
time, but they do not seem to act until they are 
prodded pretty hard. Get to work, gentlemen. The 
horsemen race mostly for their own money, but 
they do not kick if they are given a chance to race. 

o 

BIG MEETING AT GRAND RAPIDS. 



The Trotter and Pacer has it on the very highest 
authority that the selection of dates made by the 
Grand Circuit stewards was exactly to the liking of 
the Grand Rapids people, despite the fact that they 
were left out of the circuit. Arrangements have 
already been made for a meeting of Grand Circuit 
proportions to be held at Grand Rapids the week 
of July 18, preceding the opening of the Grand Circuit 
of Kalamazoo. At least two early closing events 
worth $5,000 each will be offered, and it may be 
possible that there will be one of $10,000 and one 
of $5,000. The proposed meeting, which is as certain 
to be held as is anything within the control of human 
beings, will add at least one big opportunity to those 
afforded campaigning horsemen through the racing 
season. As now understood, Terre Haute will not 
give an early meeting. There is some doubt about 
Peoria, and that will leave Grand Rapids to give 
the first big meeting of the year. The shipment from 
Grand Rapids to Kalamazoo is less than fifty miles, 
and trainers coming from the South with their strings 
can get to Grand Rapids just as easily as they can 
to any other prominent point in Michigan. Further 
particulars concerning the program of classes will 
be furnished within a very short time, and it is prob- 
able that entries to the big early closing events will 
close March 15. 

Grand Rapids has one of the fastest mile tracks 
in the country, and its meeting last season was one 
of the best of the year. The management of this 
year's meeting will be in the hands of Mr. H. J. 
Kline, a man thoroughly experienced in every detail 
of the business, and everything points to a brilliant 
success. — Trotter and Pacer. 

• o 

TODAY AT LOS ANGELES. 



Every thrill that the combination of a man and a 
horse can offer from a harness race to the taming of 
the beligerent bronco will be included in the joint 
offering of the Los Angeles Driving Club and the Out 
West Riding Club at Agricultural Park Saturday 
afternoon, January 29. 

Ordinarily this repertoire of events would be con- 
sidered sufficient for one afternoon, but the clubs 
have decided to throw in a few other attractions for 
good measure. 

There will be four harness races for horses owned 
in the Los Angeles Driving Club which alone would 
make a good afternoon's sport. 

Mrs. Del Blanchard, said to be the only woman 
in the world who will ride any horse, broken or un- 
broken, will demonstrate the power of a firm femi- 
nine hand in conquering the cranky cayuse. while 
Capt. George Bartlett who can chirograph the cog- 
nomens of his friends on a distant target with bullets, 
will jingle his favorite "shooting irons" in an exhi- 
bition of marksmanship. 

Between the harness events, of which there will 
be at least four, will be broncho "busting," steer 
roping and other feats of horsemanship with a repro- 
duction of the Greeley stage hold-up as a grand finale. 
This one event will bring 150 picked horsemen into 
action. 

A. P. Richardson, president of the Out West Hiding 
Club, who in conjunction with E. J. Delorey, secre- 
tary of the Los Angeles Driving Club, Is preparing 
the details of the program, states that from 350 to 
100 riders will participate in the events of the after- 
noon. 

o 

TWO BIG STAKES. 

Harry K. Devereux, secretary of the American 
Association of Trotting Horse Breeders, announces 
that the track over which the first two futurities 
of that association will be contested this year will 
be selected on or before August I. These futurities 
are the Stallion Stake, which will be worth $15,000 
or more, and the Matron Stake, which will be worth 
nearly as much. The list of nominations to the Stal- 
lion and Matron Stakes No. 3 for foals of 1909, are 
eminently satisfactory, 85 stallions having been 
named in the former and 187 breeders having made 
Dominations in the latter. In the futurities to be 
decided this year, payments are due as follows: May 
1, $15 on trotters. $10 on pacers. July 1, $25 on trot- 
ters, $10 on pacers. Night before the race, $100 on 
trotters, $25 on pacers. All moneys in these stakes 
go to the same, and are divided 75 per cent to the 
trotters, 25 per cent to the pacers. Each race is best 
three in five, with four divisions of the money. 
o 

Drink Jackson's Naps Soda. 



1 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1910. 



DEATH OF HORRY W. MEEK. 



Although not unexpected to his relatives and imme- 
diate associates, the death last Friday in Oakland, 
California, of Horry W. Meek, the well-known farmer, 
horse breeder and capitalist of San Lorenzo, Cal.. 
came as a surprise and shock to the majority of his 
acquaintances, as few knew of the severity of his 
illness. He was only a little over fifty years of age, 
and therefore in the prime of manhood. Diabetes 
was the cause of his early demise. Horry W. Meek 
was born in Oregon, April 12, 1859, and when a small 
child came to California with his father, William 
Meek, who settled with his family in Alameda county, 
purchasing a tract of several thousand acres between 
Oakland and Hayward, which he devoted principally 
to fruit growing. This farm developed into one of the 
most valuable properties in Alameda county, the Meek 
orchards being famous a'.l over the country for theil 
products. 

After the death of his father, Horry W. continued 
his residence on the home place, assuming the man- 
agement of the estate until his younger brother, 
William E., was old enough to share its responsi- 
bilities with him. 

The deceased received his early education in the 
public schools at Hayward, after which he entered 
the University of California, whence he graduated 
in 1877. Soon afterward, his father dying, he as- 
sumed the management of the estate. 

The elder Meek was a great lover of highly bred 
horses and was one of the first of this State's citizens 
to take up the breeding of the light harness horse. 
He became the owner of the thoroughbred mare 
Bonnie Belle by Williamson's Belmont out of Liz 
(livens by imported Langford, also of a mare called 
Witch that was by Dolphin (son of the Eaton Horse 
122), out of Dolly, a mare known as the J. M. Parker 
mare and said to be a thoroughbred. These two 
mares were the foundation of a family of record 
holders that have achieved fame on the race tracks 
of the country. In 1883 the mare Witch was sent by 
Horry W. Meek to the court of Steinway, the Strath- 
more stallion that had been brought to California by 
Seth Cook, who founded the Oakwood Park Stock 
Farm, and the produce was a bay filly that became 
famous as Cricket, the first mare that ever paced a 
mile in 2:10, and from Cricket Mr. Meek bred and 
raised no less than six standard performers, among 
them William Harold 2:13%, sire of Janice 2:0S% 
and others. Witch also produced a full sister to 
Cricket, a mare called Carmelita that is the dam of 
Cavalier 2:11%. 

From the thoroughbred mare Bonnie Belle by Wil- 
liamson's Belmont descended a big family of horses 
with standard speed. Bonnie Belle was bred to the 
thoroughbred stallion Woodburn and produced Cen- 
tennial Belle, a mare that won many running races 
at the district fairs in this State and afterwards 
foaled a daughter by Ulster Chief that to the 
cover of Diablo produced the fast pacer Clipper 
2:06. Centennial Belle was bred to Nutwood 600 and 
produced Patti, the dam of Lustre 2:22 and Sidnut 
2:25%. Patti is also the dam of Fenella, dam of 
Janice 2:08%, and consequently Mr. Meek bred both 
the sire and dam of this last named mare. Eric 2:17, 
Fallacy 2:17%, Edwina 2:21%, Fancy 2:27, Dan 
Burns 2:15, Iloilo 2:15 and several other standard 
performers all came from the Bonnie Belle family. 

When the Meek estate was divided among the heirs 
a few years ago Horry Meek curtailed the horse 
breeding to some extent, but retained a few choice 
mares and took a pride in raising his own driving 
stock. He was an excellent reinsman and an experr 
horseman in every way, being often seen in the 
saddle accompanied by his son and daughters, all 
riding trotting bred horses that were trained to go 
all the saddle gaits. 

Horry W. Meek was a man of affairs, being actively 
engaged in banking and other enterprises as well as 
terming. He was a prominent Mason and Knight 
Templar, and as a citizen who devoted much of his 
time to the building up of the best interests of the 
community in which he lived, was held in the highest 
esteem. His home life was particularly charming 
and no man more thoroughly enjoyed the company of 
his wife and children. He is survived by a wife, one 
son and two daughters, and his death will be pro- 
foundly regretted by everyone that had the good 
fortune to be acquainted with him in his lifetime. 

LIVE STOCK BREEDERS BANQUET. 



The annual banquet of the California Live Stock 
Breeders' Association was held in the ball room of 
the Palace Hotel last Monday evening. About eighty 
persons were present. President S. B. Wright of 
Santa Rosa acted as toastmaster. 

Mayor McCarthy welcomed the members of the 
association to the city, saying that the key to the 
city had been lost, but they were welcome to come 
and go at liberty. He advocated a livestock meet- 
ing here every year, and said that he hoped the asso- 
ciation would become so strongly organized that its 
power would be felt throughout the State. 

Those who made addresses were: President, S. B. 
W right; Judge Peter J. Shields, "Back to the Farm"; 
George P. Bellows, "Some Experiences of a Live 
Stock Auctioneer"; Carroll Cook, "Recreation as Rec- 
reation"; Leo. S. Robinson, "Relation of a Bureau 
of Information to the Live Stock Breeders"; Charles 
Keane, D. V. S., "Control of Diseases of Live Stock 
in California"; Professor C. W. Rubel, "Why a 
Farmer Should Practice Rigorous Selection"; Pro- 
fessor H. Phillips, "The Horse"; Captain J. G. Lang- 
don, "Remounts." 



OUR LOS ANGELES LETTER. 



Los Angeles, Jan. 25, 1910. 

We had summer weather here three or four days 
last week and work-outs was the order of the day. 
Not only the drivers but the horses seemed to enjoy 
it, but now it has changed again and there are such 
heavy frosts in the early hours of the morning that 
the track does not get dried out enough to work on 
till ten or eleven o'clock and in the shade of the 
trees up the back stretch not even by that time very 
often. Jogging at eight or nine o'clock at Agricul- 
tural Park gives the sensation of stepping into an 
ice house as soon as the back stretch is reached; 
there must be at least 10 degrees difference in the 
temperature between it and the straight side. 

Just at present the colts are in the public eye 
and their doings are watched more carefully than 
the performances of the older horses and a number 
of them will bear watching, a better looking, better 
headed and better gaited lot of young things would 
be hard to find on any track in the country. It seems 
as if all you had to do was to throw a set of har- 
ness on them, show them the track and they will 
do the rest as naturally as a duck takes to water. 
Red Garrety has a ten-months' old black filly that's 
hardly bridle-wise yet, but the first time he gave her 
her head she frisked off a quarter in 47 seconds 
and the last eighth in 23 seconds and did it like a 
five-year-old road horse. She has a license to go, as 
she is by Zombro, dam by Bingen, second dam by 
Axtell. 

C. A. Canfields colts are all going well for Walter 
Maben who has them in charge and the Walter 
Barker-Sue two-year-old colt Dick \Y., named after 
Mr. Canfield's courteous and popular secretary, Dick 
C. Wallace, can step a good deal better than a 2:20 
gait any time he is called upon. This is the colt 
that last year was as bad as a "broncho" to break, 
and in fact that is his stable name yet, but his man- 
ners are now as good as his namesake, for I saw 
Maben this morning driving him round the park 
among automobiles, hay wagons and led horses with- 
out his batting an eye at anything, and he will stand 
without fretting. 

It would be hard to find a better looking and better 
prospect than the three-year-old filly by Walter Bar- 
ker, dam Mamie Elizabeth, the dam of El Volante. 
She would command attention anywhere on account 
of her color and markings. She is a light chestnut 
and has clipped out a cream color, with a blaze face 
and white legs all round, above her knees in front 
and to her hocks behind with the inside of her thighs 
white. She is a striking looking animal; she is 
beautifully built and gaited. That she has speed she 
demonstrated last year, when she trotted in 2:21% 
in a race up north and that with not more than a 
month's training. Every one of Walter Barker's 
get have looks, speed and disposition, but this filly 
Eileen fills my eye. Mr. Canfield has certainly two 
blue ribbon winners in EI Volante and Eileen at any 
horse show in the country in their classes. 

John W. Nickerson's mare Ethel G. by Zombro is 
coming fast and surprised pretty much everyone, in- 
cluding her driver, by stepping a mile nice and handy 
in 2:26% with a quarter in 35 seconds. She is as 
pretty as a picture and exceptionally well-gaited. 
She is always on a trot and good headed in company. 
It now looks as if she would learn to go fast. 

The entries for the $1000 purses for two-year-olds 
offered by Messrs. Canfield and Clark are beginning 
to come in from all directions and the prospects for 
a large entry list are good. 

There will be an entertainment given by the Out 
West Riding Club and the Los Angeles Driving Club 
at Agricultural Park on Saturday, the 29th. 

The matter of consolidating the different harness 
horse interests and adding an annual fair will be 
taken up next week and hurried to a conclusion. It 
takes a long time to get up a first class fair with 
all the different classes and large prize list to say 
nothing of securing the outside attractions necessary 
to make it a success. Every association gets to work, 
as soon as the fair is over on the next one and we 
have no more time than is absolutely needed if we 
start at once. 

The wreckers have been out at Agricultural Park 
looking over the grand stand stables and other build- 
ing that are to be torn down, so it looks as if work 
on the new plant was about to start. 

JAMES. 

o 

GOOD DRIVER ESSENTIAL. 



John Splan says: A good driver is as essential as 
a good horse. I don't know that a good man could 
do much with a stick of a horse, but I've seen many 
a good horse defeated that would have won if his 
driver had known his business. Just what makes a 
good driver you can't tell. You see, a good driver 
has got to more than sit behind a horse. He must 
look out for the shoeing, must get the horse's head 
just right, and know how he must be fed and har- 
nessed, and all that. There are a hundred things 
besides the mere driving that he must have his eye 
on, and be studying. 

Horses are just as different as are people. Some 
are nervous, fretting and stewing all the time, and 
others are so cool that a cyclone wouldn't make 
'em jump. There's one thing a driver must have, 
and that's a cool head. He mustn't be all down 
when he don't win, or all up when he does, but 
just take it as it comes and go at it again. I've seen 
men on the track with money up on their horses, 
who were as worked up about it as an old lady that 
has got to have her tooth pulled out. That won't do. 



L. B. DANIELS PRAISES CHICO'S TRACK. 



The horse business is rather quiet in Chico at 
present, although there are about eighteen head of 
trotters and pacers of various abilities at the track. 

Among them are Scotch John 2:11%, Katalina 
2:11%, a two-year-old called Odd Mark by Prince 
Ansel that is a pacer and has been a quarter in 35 
seconds, also another by Prince Ansel caMed Joseph 
D. whose dam is by Nutwood Wilkes, that can pace 
some and do it right. I like him letter than any 
colt I ever sat behind. AH Style by Stam B. 2:11% 
is also in my stable and looks good. I will make a 
season with him here and then take him to the races, 
the green trotter that beats him will have to step 
some. I have also a good three-year-old filly by 
Moormont, dam by Clay, that has been in my stable 
two months, can trot a 2:40 clip, and I think will 
make a good trotter. These are all in my stable at 
present. 

Barney Simpson is here with his good stallion 
Arner 2:17%, that is big and fat and will make a 
big season here as bis get are popular. Barney has 
one of Arner's colts out of a Kentucky Baron mare: 
that shows a lot of trot, and a pacer by him, dam by 
Whips, that is a fast pacer. There is another also a 
pacer by Arner, dam by Dr. Hicks, that belongs to 
C. L. Nelson and is quite a trotter. 

John Sangster has his good six-year-old green trot- 
ter Directrome by Monochrome, dam by Directum, 
looking fine, and yesterday I saw him step through 
the stretch hitched to a Miller cart in 32% seconds. 
Sangster also has a two-year-old out of the dam of 
Directrome that is just being broken and he acts like 
a trotter right now. 

Ed Jackson is here with two head, one is called 
The Ice Man. He is by William Harold 2:13% and 
is a pacer. The other is a trotter and, while I have 
forgotten how he is bred, he can step pome just the 
same. 

I have seen in the papers lately a great deal about 
winter tracks. There is only one track and that is at 
Chico. It is as good in winter as any track in Cali- 
fornia, not excepting Pleasanton or any other place, 
and when it comes to summer it is good all the time. 
A horse can step fast over it and be safe any month 
in the year. Sincerely. 

L. B. DANIELS. 

Chico, Jan. 21, 1910. 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

L. E. Williamson, Rive-rside. — As we do not find the 
mare Venus Smith registered, a filly out of her can- 
not be registered until she is. Ed McKinney is stand- 
ard and registered, his number being 47870. 

E. H. Sherman, El Centro, Cal. — We have no speci- 
fications for laying out a %-mile track. The best 
way is to get a surveyor who can lay out an oval 
best suited to your land. 

J. R. Collett, Bishop, Cal. — We can find no horse 
called Billy B. with a record of 2:14. nor one called 
Bill Nye with a record of 2:09. There are a half 
dozen or more horses called Billy B. with records 
from 2:12% to 2:30, and one called Bill Nye with a 
record of 2:14%. The last named was a black 
pacing gelding by Oscar Steinway, dam not traced. 
Oscar Steinway, register number 7295. is by Stein 
way 180S, dam Frankie Katon by Hambletonian 725, 
second dam Mary Fish by Gen. Taylor, third dam by 
Williamson's Belmont. 

John T. Renas, Oaklej", Cal. — Elmo 2:27 is regis- 
tered in Vol. 4 of the America!! Trotting Register as 
by Mohawk 604 (son of Long Island Black Hawk), 
dam untraced. Elmo was brought to this State by 
Orrin Hickok, and was owned afterwards by H. W. 
Seale, who claimed that he had information that 
Elmo's dam was by the son of the thoroughbred Sir 
Richard, but this breeding on the dam's side was 
never accepted by the Register. 

C. H. McF., Chico. — It is unlawful to dock a horse 
in California and in several other States, but there 
are a number of States in the Union where it is not 
unlawful. 

Fred Kane, Pleasanton. — Sweet Marie 2:02 is by 
McKinney 2:11',, dam Lady Rivers by Carr's Mam- 
brino 1789, second dam Susie by Vermont 322. Ver- 
mont was by Independence, a son of Black Hawk 5. 
Up to the close of 1908 there were no other 2:30 
trotters by McKinney that were out of mares by 
Carr's Mambrino, and do not think that any of the 
Mc Kinney s that entered the list this year were out 
of daughters of that horse. 

o 

F. E. Marsh, proprietor of the Grattan Stock Farm, 
Prairie View, 111., has decided to make his home in 
Seattle, Wash., in the future and will dispose of the 
most of his breeding stock. The stallion Grattan 
he will keep for sentimental reasons and will always 
see that the old fellow has a good time. Mr. Marsh 
will also retain his farm for the present, but the 
breeding industry will be discontinued. 

It was only a short time ago that Mr. Marsh paid 
$50,000 for the Libertyville, 111., mile track at a 
receiver's sale. This magnificent race course, with 
its steel grandstand and commodious stables cost 
over $150,000, and what its future will be is now in 
doubt. No meeting has been held over the course 
for several years. The early meetings were success- 
ful from a racing standpoint, but owing to inadequate 
transportation, facilities the public never turned out 
in sufficiently large numbers to make the meeting 
a paying investment. — Western Horseman. 



Saturday, January 29, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



6 



NOTES AND NEWS J 

Entries close February 1st for the Pleasanton 
Sale. Get your consignments in. 



A county fair will be held at Redding, Shasta 
county during the month of September this year. 



Horry W. Meek, who died in Oakland last Friday, 
was the breeder of Cricket, the first mare to pace 
to a record of 2:10. 



Mr. Anthons, a wealthy cattleman of Reno, Nevada, 
paid John E. Bailey of Bakersfield $500 for a two- 
year-old by Richard B. recently. 



George Ramage is back at Pleasanton again with 
a string of horses. He has been training at Los 
Banos during the past few months. 



At least 500 trotters and pacers will be in training 
in California by March 1st, and the greatest number 
at any one track will be at Pleasanton as usual. 



The Rocklin Driving Club has postponed its mati- 
nee until some time in February owing to the heavy 
rains that have made racing out of the question for 
a few weeks. 



An added and interesting feature of the Detroit 
Grand Circuit meeting this year will be the Chicago 
Horseman Futurity for three-year-olds which has a 
guaranteed value of $15,000. 



A telephone has been put in at the Pleasanton 
track, which is a great convenience for absentee 
owners who desire to call up the trainers and ask 
how fast their horses are going. 



From the Richmond, Virginia, Evening Journal of 
January 8th we learn that Ted Bunch has been en- 
gaged to train the Acca Stock Farm horses this year. 
This farm owns Akar, a son of Aquilin 2:19%, that 
young Bunch looks upon as one of the fastest pacers 
he ever handled. 



The extremely cold weather during the early part 
of this month and the heavy rains which have fol- 
lowed will make the breeding season a little later 
than usual this year. Very few mares will be sent 
to the stallions before March 1st. 



Mead & Nichols, lessees of Kinney Lou 2:08% 
liave reduced his service fee to $75. This son of Mc- 
Kinney never stood for less than $100 before and 
probably never will again as his get will show this 
year what a great sire he is. 



Jack Phippen has a two-year-old by Bon Voyage out 
of Athene by Dexter Prince that is making the rail- 
birds at the new San Jose track sit up and take 
notice. This little fellow has only been stepped up 
a couple of times but already acts like an old cam- 
paigner and can show better than a forty gait. 



The California State Fair Futurity, $5000 guaran- 
teed, for the produce of mares covered in 1909, will 
close with Secretary J. A. Filcher, Sacramento, Feb- 
ruary 1st, which is Tuesday next. It only costs $2 
to nominate a mare. Read the conditions in the 
advertisement. 



Ten dollars is due February 1st on two-year-olds, 
foals of 1908, that are entered in Pacific Breeders' 
Futurity No. 8. They trot this year as two-year-olds 
and next year as three-year-olds. Keep your colts 
in and give them a chance to win you some of the 
$7250. 

William McDonald, the popular schoolmaster of 
the Livermore valley, and member of the Board of 
Education of Alameda county, has written a very 
interesting history of the draft horse industry of the 
Livermore valley for the Live Stock and Dairy 
Journal. 



lion Bonita is the appropriate and beautiful name 
of Ray Mead's handsome yearling filly by Bon Voy- 
age, dam Carrie B. 2:18 (dam of Ray o' Light (3) 
2:081,4). This filly like all the Bon Voyages is a 
square trotter and shows no pacing inclination and 
if breeding, good looks and individuality count for 
anything should make a fast trotter. 



Harry Brown has at the San Jose track a yearling 
pacing colt that has every right to become a great 
side wheeler. He is by the old champion, Star 
Pointer 1:59%, first dam by Nutwood Wilkes, second 
dam the great brood mare Lilly Langtry, dam of Ed 
B. Young 2:11% and five or six more by Nephew. 



The Riverside Driving Club has selected a speed 
committee consisting of Alex Nelson, G. M. Carrigan 
and F. P. Ogden, to classify the horses owned in the 
club and arrange programs for the matinees during 
the year. H. P. Zimmerman was chosen clerk of the 
course, H. G. Stanley starter, and G. H. Judd track 
manager. The club has voted to participate with the 
San Bernardino club in the latter's Washington 
Birthday matinee, but has selected July 4th for its 
own principal matinee of the year, in which it will 
invite other clubs to participate. 



There are three or four youngsters by Henry Hel- 
man's Jay Bird stallion Alconda Jay, that have 
shown such speed at the trot while being broken 
that horsemen who have seen them are predicting 
great things for Alconda Jay as a sire. Didn't we 
tell you so? 



Carrie B. 2:18, the dam of Ray o' Light (3) 2:08%, 
will be bred to Bon Voyage this year. Carrie B. has 
just weaned a very handsome filly by Bon Voyage 
and Mr. Mead is anxious for another of the same 
kind. Carrie B. is now heavy in foal to Kinnev Lou 
2:07%. 



Mrs. F. H. Burke, of the La Siesta Ranch, San 
Jose, one of the most enthusiastic horsewomen of 
the State, has leased from Thos. Ronan the brood- 
mare Birdie by Jay Bird, that is the dam of the 
stallion Bodecker that trotted the Pleasanton track 
in 2:08% last spring. Birdie will be bred to Bon 
Voyage this year. 



Oniska, the dam of that great trotter, San Fran- 
cisco 2:07%, is owned by Mr. F. E. Alley, proprietor 
of the Bonaday Stock Farm, of Roseburg, Oregon, and 
was bred to his young stallion Bonaday last year and 
is heavy in foal. The foal should be a born trotter 
and will probably be the first grandson or grand- 
daughter of Bon Voyage. 



Wdntbrop Howland, of Live Oak, near Redlands, 
lost a very valuable saddle horse in a peculiar man- 
ner two weeks ago. The animal was standing near 
a creek which had been greatly swollen by the rains, 
when the ground caved in, precipitating the horse 
about forty feet into the torrent below where he 
drowned. 



Nutwood W'ilkes 2:16% made his first season in his 
new home last year and although it was a very heavy 
one nearly all the mares that were bred to him either 
had records, or were producers of note, and it is 
known that eighty per cent of them are safe in foal, 
a most remarkable showing. He is now thoroughly 
acclimated and has filled out as round as an apple. 



The Canfield-Clark Stakes No. 1, and the Canfield- 
C'ark Stakes No. 2, will close for entry next Tues- 
day, February 1st. In stake No. 1, which is for foals 
of 1908 to trot as two-year-olds this year, the en- 
trance fee is $10; for stake No. 2, for foals of 1909 
to trot in 1911, the entrance is but $5. Read the 
conditions in the advertisement. Each stake is 
guaranteed to be worth $1000. They should be gen- 
t rously supported. 



W. V. Bennett of Chico will ship his pacing filly by 
Arner 2:17% to San Jose to be bred to Bon Voyage 
( I) 2:12%. The results from this mating should be 
something out of the ordinary as Bon Voyage's fast- 
est colt, Bon Vivant (2) 2:16%, the fastest trotting 
two-year-old stallion of 1909, is out of a mare by 
Diablo 2:09%, a full brother to Arner. Bon Voyage 
seems to cross particularly well with pacing mares 
or pacing bred mares, having been bred to a number 
of them and in every instance siring a trotter. 



The Pleasanton Times contained the following item 
recently: "It is a matter of much congratulation to 
both Pleasanton and those interested in horses and 
the park that the longer Mr. Armstrong is here and 
the better people are becoming acquainted with him, 
the more he is liked. Pleasanton certainly enter- 
tained a lucky week when Mr. Armstrong first visited 
it last year and decided to buy^ the property he has 
improved so wonderfully since." 



There are few localities that have three as great 
stallions making a public season as there are now 
at the San Jose track in Kinney Lou 2:07%, Bon 
Voyage (3) 2:12%, and Zolock 2:05%. The breed- 
ers of Santa Clara Valley and vicinity should im- 
prove the opportunity they now have to breed to such 
great sires as the demand for stallions of their class 
is greater now than ever before and any or all three 
of these great horses may be on the other side 
of the continent or the earth next year. 



Excellent results from systematic breeding of polo 
ponies are reported by the Polo and Riding Pony 
Society of England. It has advised polo players to 
breed their good polo mares as soon as they are in- 
capacitated through accident or otherwise from fur- 
ther use in the game. As evidence that performance 
is the proper basis for selection of breeding ponies 
the society states that the ponies bred along these 
lines are playing in the best games, including inter- 
national matches, and that nearly all polo-bred ponies 
which have come to the front in the last two seasons 
are out of dams which have played in good company. 



The Northern Colorado Racing and Fair Circuit 
Board has arranged dates for fairs and races in 
August and September as follows: Loveland, August 
24, 25, 26; Longmont, September 1, 2; Fort Morgan, 
September 6, 7, 8, 9; Denver, September 10-17; Fort 
Collins, September 20, 21, 22, 23; Greeley, September 
27, 28, 29, 30. The entries for the races close Au- 
gust 10. There will be classes for 2:15 and 2:20 pace, 
and 2:22 and 2:30 trot. Purses will be hung up of 
$400 for each of these uniform class races. Other 
purses will be offered to close later. Each town must 
send in its complete program of races by April 1. 
The circuit formerly included Laramie, and Douglas, 
Wyoming, but these places have not been repre- 
sented for some time. 



A recent addition to Hudd Doble's stable at the 
San Jose track is the large and handsome five-year- 
old trotting stallion, Menlo Kinney, by Kinney Lou 
2:07%, dam Our Belle (formerly Menlo Belle 2:28%) 
by Menlo 2:21%, son of Nutwood 600. Menlo Kin- 
ney is owned by John Offut of Petaluma, who also 
owns his dam, a mare that is many seconds faster 
than her record. This young son of Kinney Lou 
was only worked three months in his three-year-old 
form by J. W. Zibbell of Fresno, who drove him a 
mile in 2:30. Last year Mr. Offut kept him on his 
ranch at Petaluma and bred him to a dozen or more 
mares. 



The Petaluma papers are advocating the purchase 
of Kenilworth Park from the Estate of Harry Stover 
by the city. Kenilworth Park was formerly the 
property of the Sonoma and Marin Agricultural So- 
ciety and one of the largest district fairs in the State 
was annually held there. Besides a regulation mile 
track, there is a large grandstand, a couple of hun- 
dred stalls, and a large pavilion. A beautiful grove 
of trees is also one of the features of the property, 
which could be made into a fine public park without 
destroying the track. As the property is not priced 
high to the city it would be an excellent investment 
for the corporation of Petaluma. 



C. H. Thompson of Salt Lake City, Utah, has three 
Kansas-bred horses in the stable of Fred Ward at 
Los Angeles, Cal., that he expects to race through 
the East the coming season. Escobado 2:13% by 
Escobar 2:13%, dam Leah (dam of Kirkwood Jr. 
2:10, etc.), by Ensign 2:28%, could step a mile in 
2:08 very easily last fall; the pacer Joe McGregor 
(3) 2:21% by Fergus McGregor, dam Daisy Young 
(dam of six) by Joe Young 2:18, was second three 
heats to Adam G. in 2:07% to 2:07%, quite early in 
the season; Doctor Wayo (3) 2:24%, by Wilkhurst 
2:17%, dam by Trevillian 2:08%, was not started 
in 1909, but will be raced the coming season in his 
five-year-old form. 



Plans for the American Trotting Derby at Read- 
ville, Mass., this year embody some radical changes 
which the expected to eliminate the unsatisfactory 
features of the 1909 event. It is probable that in 
the trotting division only horses with public records 
of 2:15 or better will be allowed to enter and simi- 
lar restrictions will be imposed in the pacing divis- 
ion. No horses will be entered that have not been 
driven in at least three public races before time 
for the handicapping. It is also probable that Mr. 
Welch will resort to elimination heats to avoid the 
great crush of contestants that well-nigh ruined 
tast year's performance. There is a plan on foot also 
to separate hoppled from natural pacers. 



Anteros 6020, died at Crawfordsville, Indiana, on 
the 17th instant, where he was owned by Bridges & 
Flora. Anteros was bred at Palo Alto Farm and 
was a full brother to those well known sires Anteeo 
2:16% and Antevelo 2:19%. His sire was Elec- 
tioneer 125, his dam the famous mare Columbine by 
A. W. Richmond, second dam the thoroughbred mare 
Columbia. Columbine was bred by the late Joseph 
Cairn Simpson, who bred Anteeo and Antevolo, and 
then sold her to Senator Stanford. Anteros sired 
21 standard trotters and 18 standard pacers. He 
sired the pacer Ed S. 2:08% and the dam of Prince 
Ross 2:09%. These are the only 2:10 performers that 
have descended from Anteros in the first and second 
generations. Anteros was the first foal of Columbine 
after she became the property of Senator Stanford. 
He was foaled in 1882, and consequently lived to be 
28 years old. 



The three-year-old stallion Kinney H. is for sale or 
lease by Chris Hashagen, who resides at 2801 Twenty- 
first street, San Francisco. This is one of the best 
bred McKinney colts in California. He represents 
the Wilkes-Electioneer cross on both sides of his 
pedigree. He is by Kinney Rose 2:13%, a son of the 
Wilkes stallion McKinney 2:11% that is out of a mare 
by the Electioneer stallion Falrose 2:19. Mis dam is 
Leta H. by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%, second dam the 
great brood mare Liska (3) 2:28%, dam of Lisonjero 
2:08% and four others, by Electioneer, second dam 
Lizzie, dam of three standard trotters, two pro- 
ducing sons and one producing daughter, by the 
great thoroughbred Wildidle, third dam the noted 
trotting mare and brood mare Mayflower 2:30%, a 
mare that produced Wildflower (2) 2:21, Manzanita 
2:16, and six daughters that have produced twelve 
standard performers. Wildflower is the grandam of 
Prince Ansel (2) 2:20, whose get are trotting so fast 
as colts that they are bringing him into very promi- 
nent notice as a sire of early speed. Anyone who 
will study the blood lines of Kinney H. cannot help 
being impressed with the fact that he is a remark 
abyl well bred young stallion. 

It is said that John Mackey, for many years super- 
intendent of the horse breeding farms of J. B. Hag- 
gin, will sell all his horses and remove to New York. 
When the horses on the famous Rancho del Paso 
near Sacramento were all sold or shipped to Mr. Hag- 
gin's Kentucky farm, Mackey bought a place near 
Woodland, Cal., and established his own thorough- 
bred breeding farm, although still remaining in the 
employ of Haggin. He has now sold this farm to 
W. B. Jennings, and will ship his stallions to Ken- 
tucky, but will sell the mares and foals, about thirty 
head in all. John Mackey is probably known to 
more horse breeders in California than any man 
on the Coast. He came to California some time in 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1910. 



the 00's as care-taker of the trotting stallion Geo. M. 
Pat chen Jr., the horse finally becoming the prop- 
erty of J. B. Haggin, who years ago bred as many 
trotters as thoroughbreds. There is no better judge 
of a horse living than John Mackey, and this has 
been proven many times by the purchases he has 
made in England for Mr. Haggin. An instance was 
his purchase at a ridiculously low figure of the stal- 
ion Watercress from an English breeder, the horse 
afterwards becoming one of Rancho del Paso's great- 
est sires. 

o 

There will be many new attractions at the Cali- 
fornia State Fair this year. The sum of $600 will 
be given for the best display of its products made by 
any county, with smaller sums for the second, third, 
fourth, fifth and sixth best. The best drawing fea- 
ture of the fair this year however will be the flying 
machines, the citizens of Sacramento having already 
engaged the noted aviator, Curtiss. and several other 
"bird men" to give daily exhibitions during the fair, 
agreeing to pay them $5000 per day for their exhi- 
bitions. The Sacramento valley, during the summer 
and fall months, is an ideal place for aviation, there 
seldom being any winds strong enough to hinder 
the flight of an aeroplane in any direction. 



F. H. Metz of Sacramento has sold his harness 
business in Sacramento to M. J. Murray & Co. Mr. 
Metz has recently built a nice barn with eight stalls 
just opposite the entrance to Agricultural Park, Sac- 
ramento and is now putting in all his time giving 
his three colts their early training — Major McKinley, 
Dr. Cook and Cherrycroft. The Nushagak colt has 
the straps on now and gives every evidence of hav- 
ing speed at the pacing gait. 



Napa Prince, a fine looking well bred trotting 
stallion, that sires carriage horses, is offered for 
sale by his owner F. Rohcford, of Oakland who has 
been confined to his bed for a long time and is 
unable to attend to the horse. See advertisement. 



In days gone by the California State Agricultural 
Society annually offered a prize of $100 for the best 
stallions in all breeds, the result being that the stal- 
lion show was one of the best features of the fair. 
Now the prize for best stallion is only $20, and out- 
side of the exhibits made by the firms who deal in 
draft stock, the stallion show does not amount to 
much. 



La Voyage, the handsome three-year-old by Bon 
Voyage owned b.v Mr. A. L. Scott of San Francisco, 
recently stepped a quarter over the new track at 
San Jose in 34% seconds. This colt was not raced as 
a two-year-old but the way he is starting out this 
season makes it look as if he would cut some figure 
in the three-year-old stakes this year. Joe Cuicello, 
who is training him, likes him immensely. 



The announcement that the six young stallions 
owned by Mr. Frank J. Kilpatrick have been con- 
signed to the Pleasanton sale in March has attracted 
much attention. There will be bidders on every 
one of the six, as each and every one is a royally 
bred three-year-old and a fine individual. 

Mr. F. H. Burke, proprietor of La Siesta Farm, has 
nominated in Matron Stake No. 3, for foals of 1909, 
to be trotted in 1912, the following: Be Thankful, 
bay filly by C. The Limit, dam Grace Kaiser, dam 
of Coney 2:02 by Kaiser; Mabel Clare, bay filly by 
Conductor (brother of Tom Smith 2:13%), dam 
Lady Belle Isle by Eros; Weltha, roan filly by Bo- 
daker 49130, dam Wanda 2:14% by Eros. The Ma- 
tron Stake is given by the American Association of 
Trotting Horse Breeders. 



J. Crouch & Son, of Lafayette, Indiana, have just 
sent to their manager, Mr. J. F. Campbell of Sac- 
ramento, California, a consignment of Belgian, Per- 
cherons and French coachers from their recent im- 
portations from Europe. There is a constant and 
growing demand for the horses of these breeds on 
this coast, and this firm aims to send here nothing 
but high class animals that will improve the draft 
and coach stock of any locality where they may be 
located. 



One of the oldest supporters of the "Breeder and 
Sportsman" in Sacramento, Carl Saemann, the well 
known caterer, has several volumes of the paper 
handsomely bound for reference and the use of his 
patrons and customers. He takes pride in showing 
the fi'es of this paper, and all harness horsemen 
when in difference, rely upon adjusting their disputes 
by adjourning to Carl Saemann's and looking up the 
files of this journal. 



The catalogue for the Pleasanton March sale which 
William G. Layng is getting out for Fred H. Chase 
& Co. will be the most complete catalogue ever 
issued for a sale in this State. 



E. D. Dudley of Dixon, California, has consigned 
a few very choicely bred young horses to the March 
sale at Pleasanton. 



Rush & Haile, proprietors of the Suisun Stock 
Farm will consign their yearlings by Demonio to 
the Pleasanton sale. 



BODAKER IN THE STUD. 



Last spring there was considerable excitement at 
Pleasanton when Chas. De Ryder, who was training 
Thos. Ronan's roan trotting stallion Bodaker, drove 
him a mile in 2:08%. This is the fastest mile ever 
shown by a trotter on that famous training track 
and Mr. De Ryder was figuring on taking him east, 
but the horse went wrong and Mr. Ronan decided not 
to race him. 

Bodaker is standard and registered, his number 
being 49130. He is a horse of fine proportions, 
great natural speed and is destined to be a sire 
of speed if he gets the opportunity of being mated 
with good mares. 

He was foaled in 1904, therefore being six years 
old this year. His sire was Antrim, that highly 
bred son of Aberdeen that sired Anzella 2:06%, and 
the dams of Vision 2:09% and Gen. Heurtes 2:09% 
besides many others with low records. The dam of 
Bodaker is the mare Birdie b.v Jay Bird, second dam 
Lady Lyle by Geo. Wilkes, third dam Dame Tansey 
by Daniel Lambert 102. Here is a great combina- 
tion of trotting blood. Aberdeen sired Kentucky 
Union 2:07% and the dams of Onward Silver 2:05%, 
Patchen Maid 2:08%, Good Goods 2:09%, Aldeen 
2:09% and others. Jay Bird sired Hawthorne 2:06%, 
Alceste 2:07%, Allerton 2:09%, Dulce Jay 2:09%, 
Early Bird 2:10, Invader 2:10, Gitchie Manitou 2:09%, 
and the dams of Baroness Virginia (3) 2:08%, win- 
ner of last year's Kentucky Futurity, Crescent Route 
2:08%, Codero 2:09%, Bessie Drake 2:08% and 
others. George Wilkes 2:22, sire of Rodaker's second 
dam is the greatest progenitor of race winning trot- 
ting and pacing horses that ever lived. His daugh- 
ters are wonderful producers and are the dams of 
no less than 15 trotters and pacers with records 
below 2:10. Daniel Lambert, sire of the third dam, the 
mare Dame Tansey, is one of the great representa- 
tives of the Morgan family and was noted for his 
beauty and the beauty of his get, as well as for 
being a fast trotter with a three-year-old record of 
2:42 back in 1861, and as a sire of speed with 38 
standard performers to his credit, 36 producing sons 
and 6S producing daughters, among them the dams 
of Daphne Dallas 2:05, Prima Donna 2:09%, Day 
Hook 2:09%, John Mac 2:09%, Dandy Jim 2:09%, 
Pamlico 2:10 and others. The study of the blood 
lines of Bodaker will show that he is one of the 
best bred stallions on the Coast. Those who believe 
in breeding to stallions whose ancestors on both 
sides are producers of extreme speed can find no 
fault with Bodaker. He is now at Pleasanton and 
Mr. Thos. Ronan, his owner, will be pleased to 
answer all inquiries about him. 

DEATH OF A RETIRED SULKY AND CART MANU- 
FACTURER. 



Samuel Toomey, aged eighty, a retired carriage and 
sulky manufacturer, died after a short illness on Jan- 
uary 17th, at his home, Canal Dover, Ohio. 

Mr. Toomey as been prominently identified as a 
manufacturer in the light vehicle industry since 1854, 
being the founder of the firm of S. Toomey & Co., 
Canal Dover, Ohio. He was the patentee of the 
truss axle which has been so successfully used in 
raring sulkies and training carts. 

He retired from active business about fifteen years 
ago, turning the business over to his son, Oliver 
Toomey, who has since and is still conducting the 
business. 

The deceased leaves a wife, four sons and two 
daughters. 

o 

VALLEY DRIVING CLUB OFFICIALS. 

Following are the names of officers of the Valley 
Driving Club, an enterprising and thriving organiza- 
tion of horsemen at Hemet, California: 

Dr. D. S. McCarthy, president; R. G. Case, vice- 
president; H. P. Herman, secretary; W. S. Rather, 
treasurer. 

The directors are: F. H. Holloway, Dr. F. K. 
Strasser, R. G. Case, Alger Fast, H. P. Herman, G. A. 
Butlin, M. I. Wheeler, Dr. D. S. McCarthy, Henry 
McGee, W. S. Rather, J. C. Ticknor. 

o — 

One of the subjects discussed by the stewards of 
the Grand Circuit at their recent meeting at Detroit, 
was the matter of distinguishing between records 
made on the half-mile tracks from those made on 
the mile rings. As a matter of fact a horse that 
gets a record of 2:10 over a mile course, with the 
same exertion could not negotiate the distance bet- 
ter than 2:13 on a two-lap track. It has been a topic 
that has brought forth considerable discussion dur- 
ing the past three or four years, but it has never 
been taken up by the stewards. After talking the 
matter over the stewards recommended that the 
question be taken up by the parent associations at 
their meetings next month. If it is acted upon and 
the rule changed in the future a horse that earns a 
record of 2:12 on the mile tracks will be eligible to 
the 2:13 or 2:14 class on the half-mile tracks, ac- 
cording to the number of seconds the rule-makers 
decide is a fair difference between racing on the mile 
and half-mile tracks. 

o 

i sed i- Year* With Bneceaa for SpUat, Ringbone, 
Curb, Sprains, Etc. 

1 have charge of from 30 to 50 mules and have used 
your Gombault's Caustic Balsam for the last 12 years, 
and find nothing to equal it for spavin, ringbone, splint, 
ciiih, sprains, hunches and other diseases.. 

\VM. JOHNSON. Rockvale, Colo. 



DEATH OF FRANK M. 

Modesto, Jan. 23, 1910. 

Breeder and Sportsman: — I wish to announce 
through the columns of your journal the death of 
Frank M. Old age was the cause of death. 

Yours truly, L. C. GATES. 

While Mr. Gates does not so state we believe the 
horse referred to is the old chestnut gelding by 
Priam 1798, dam a pacing mare by Gen. Dana 1757, 
that was famous on the trotting tracks of California 
about twenty years ago. Frank M. was bred at 
Stockton, California, and was foaled in 1884. He 
took his record in San Francisco in October, 1891, 
when, hitched to a .cart, he defeated Wanda 2:14%, 
Una Wilkes 2:15 and Cupid 2:18, all to sulky. He 
won in three straight heats in 2:17%, 2:19% and 2:20. 
In those days Frank M. was considered one of the 
best race horses and fastest trotters on the Pacific 
Coast. He was trained and driven in many of his 
races by the late Tommy Keating and those inter- 
ested in his ownership made a great deal of money 
racing through Montana and in California. One of 
the memorable races in which he contested was at 
Los Angeles on the 24th of October, 1891. The 
purse was $1500, free-for-all trotters. The starters 
were Frank M., Silas Skinner, Wanda and McKinney. 
This race drew the biggest crowd ever seen on the 
Los Angeles track, and caused more excitement than 
any race ever held on the track since. McKinney 
was the horse the others had to beat, and as he was 
on his home track he naturally had the sympathy 
of the crowd, although in the pools Frank M. was 
favorite, a sample pool the night before the race 
being Frank M. $30, McKinney $20, Silas Skinner $16, 
Wanda $12. At the track just before the race was 
called Frank M. sold for $55, McKinney for $50, Silas 
Skinner for $25 and Wanda for $16. The first heat 
was won by Frank M. in 2:18%, with Silas Skinner 
second, Wanda third and McKinney who had made a 
break, last. The next heat was a duel all the way 
between Frank M. and McKinney, but the latter won 
by a head and the Los Angelenos, wild with joy, car- 
ried Durfee on their shoulders from the sulky to the 
scales amid tremendous cheering. The third heat 
was won by McKinney in the same way, and in the 
fourth heat, although McKinney was very lame, and 
got away last, he gained on the leaders inch by inch, 
passed Wanda and Silas Skinner by trotting around 
them out in the big malva weeds on the back 
stretch, and finally crossed the wire with his head 
on Frank M.'s shoulder, the judge's giving the heat 
to McKinney on the ground that he had been fouled 
and carried out on the back stretch. The heat was in 
2:19%. The crowd went wild and cheered the judges 
to the echo. McKinney was at this time a four-year- 
old, while the others were aged horses. 

Frank M. won seven races and was twice second 
out of nine starts in 1890, his first year on the turf. 
The next year he won six races, was second four 
times, and once third out of eleven starts. In 1892 
he failed to win a race, only getting two heats out of 
eleven races in which he started, and that ended his 
racing career. 

o 

PERCHERON BRANDS. 

Percherons imported from France may have one or 
all of three official brands on the neck under the 
mane. Two of these are brands of the French gov- 
ernment. Stallions that stand for public service in 
France are officially examined every year. If they 
are free from periodic ophthalmia and have good 
wind they are branded with a star under the mane, 
signifying that they are certified free from these 
unsoundnesses and allowed to stand for public serv- 
ice. If at the first or any subsequent inspection 
they are found to have either of these unsound- 
nesses they are branded with a letter R to show 
that they are rejected from public service. Stal- 
lions that do not stand for public service do not need 
to be inspected, and, of course, are not branded by 
the French government. 

The third brand and the one of greatest impor- 
tance to breeders is that of the Percheron Society 
of France, which signifies that the horse has been 
recorded by it. This brand resembles our dollar 
sign except that it has one vertical bar instead of 
two and is placed under the mane on the neck of 
Percheron stallions and mares recorded in the 
French stud book. The brand is designed from the 
letters S and P, which stand for Societe Percheronne, 
the French name of the Percheron Society of France. 
M. A. Thieux, secretary of that society, stated in a 
'etter to this office some time ago that "all horses 
recorded in the Percheron Stud Book of France carry 
under the mane the letters S and P interlaced." — 
Chicago Breeders' Gazette. 

o 

Santa Rosa is in the market for the Breders' meet- 
ing this year, and will put in a bid for it. 

o 

"WORTH ITS WEIGHT IN GOLD." 

• I have used some of your ABSORBING. It is worth 
its weight in gold. I used it on a mule that was eat 
in barb wire. I was going to take her out and kill 
her, as she could not walk. I saw your advertisement, 
so I tried ABSORB INK. and it cured the mule right 
awav." The above is what A. C. Freeman of Dixon, 
Cal., wrote as. his experience with ABSORBINK. An 
excellent preparation to use in cases of Blemishes, Soft 
Swellings. Bog Spavin, Rheumatism, Paralysis. Stiff 
Shoulders, etc. Write for free booklet giving detailed 
information. ABSORBINK, $2.00 at druggists or sent 
express prepaid upon receipt of price. 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F„ 54 Temple Street, Spring- 
field, Mass. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



i 



Saturday, January 29, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



SPEED SIRES OF 1909. 



Stallion That Sired Five or More Standard Perform- 
ers During the Year. 

[By Henry Ten Eyck White] 

When a stallion has five or more of his get take 
trotting records of 2:30 or better in one season he 
is a good way above the average as a sire. As show- 
ing which strains of blood were most potent in beget- 
ting trotting speed (luring 1909 I have compiled the 
subjoined table, which gives the name and record of 
each horse, the name and record of his sire, and the 
number of his additions to the 2:30 list last year: 

Name. Sire. Perf. 

Prodigal 2:16 Pancoast 2:21% 20 

Todd 2:14% Bingen 2:06% 19 

McKinney 2:11% Alcyone 2:27 15 

Zombro2:ll McKinney 2:11% 15 

Bingen 2:06% May King 2:21% 12 

Peter the Great 2:07% Pilot Medium 11 

Allerton 2:09% Jay Bird 2:31% 10 

Bellini 2:13% Artillery 2:2iy 2 10 

Silent Brook 2:16% Dark Night 10 

Axworthy 2:15% Axtell 2:12 9 

Moko Baron Wilkes 2:18 9 

Baron Dillon 2:12 Baron Wilkes 2:18 8 

Adbell 2:23 Advertiser 2: 15% 7 

Arion 2:07% Electioneer 7 

Parole 2:16 Patron 2:14% 7 

The Bondsman Baron Wilkes 2: 18 7 

Cecilian Chief 2:27% Ga'betta Wilkes 2:19%.. 6 

Onward Silver 2:05% Onward 2:25% 6 

Sidney Dillon Sidney, p, 2:19% 6 

Bernadotte 2:29% Wilton 2:19% 5 

Bingara Bingen 2:06% 5 

Heir at Law 2:12 Mambrino King 5 

Jay Bird 2:31% George Wilkes 2:22 5 

Margrave 2:15% Baron Wilkes 2:18 5 

Mobel 2:10% Moko 5 

Pactolus 2:12% Patronage 5 

Red Heart 2:19 Red Wilkes 5 

Such a tabulation is a many sided affair when it 
comes to an argument as to what it does or does 
not prove. For example, sires with records are over- 
whelmingly in the majority, as of the twenty-seven 
horses scheduled only four are minus records. These 
are Moko, Sidney Dillon, The Bondsman, and Bin- 
gara, a quartet whose names mean much. 

On the face of the returns it looks as if the anti- 
development people had a fine chance for argument, 
but as a matter of fact every one of the four record- 
less horses in the list was a fast trotter as a colt. 
Moko could step in 2:25 as a three-year-old, but 
owing to a slight injury was sent back from the 
Cleveland track, where Ed Benyon was training him, 
to the Walnut Hall farm, and as his colts immedi- 
ately began to trot so fast their sire did not need 
the distinction of a record the stallion never again 
was trained. The Bondsman could trot around 
2:11 as a three-year-old and was prominent a couple 
of heats in the Kentucky Futurity won by Boralma. 
I timed him a workout mile for that race in 2:14%. 
Sidney Dillon could trot a 2:25 gait when he was a 
youngster. Bingara, never trained to race or driven 
a full mile at speed, trotted eighths as a yearling on 
the Allen farm half-mile track in :19; as a two-year- 
old eights in :17 and a quarter in :36, which shows 
him to be a fast natural trotter. 

Apropos of Bingara, his sire, Bingen, is the only 
member of the above list that also is represented 
by two sons in the compilation, and it is worth noting 
that two of them — Todd and Bingara — are from mares 
by Arion, thus giving them a double dose of Elec- 
tioneer blood, as Arion is a son of that horse, while 
Bingen is a grandson. Another point that should not 
be overlooked in this connection is that of the five 
new trotters by Bingara four were two-year-olds and 
the other a three-year-old— which means a lot in any 
case, and is especially significant when the fact is 
known that up to 1908 Bingara had sired but forty- 
six foals — five in 1904, eleven in 1905, fourteen in 
1906 and sixteen in 1907. At the close of 1908 Bin- 
gara had eight trotters in the 2:30 list [He never has 
sired a pacer], and the five added last season gives 
him a total of thirteen trotters in the 2:30 list out 
of forty-six foals that has been born to him and that 
were above the age of weanlings. 

Whatever way it is looked at this showing is a re-, 
markable one, and, as Bingara gets colt trotters of 
stake caliber, as witness Bisa, second in 2:06% at 
three years, and Binvolo 2:15% in a winning race at 
two and 2:09% in a winning race at three, he must 
on his own showing in 1908 and 1909, be rated high 
as a sire. Considered in connection with Todd 
[dead], another son of Bingen, the two form, with 
their sire, a trio hard to beat under like relation- 
ship. 

The Alcyone blood is famous for its excellence in 
the first generation and the impressive manner in 
which it has bred on. Although Alcyone died at the 
age of ten years and did not leave a large number 
of foals, his name ever has been prominent in the 
pedigree of some good performer. More than that, 
the family is a race horse family, "tin cup" records 
not often being necessary. Until McKinney came 
east his progeny had none but race records to their 
account, and in considering McKinney, which stands 
third in the above table with fifteen new 2:30 trot- 
ters, his son Zombro, which also has fifteen, should 
not be overlooked. Moreover Zombro in 1909 led 
all stallions as a sire of new standard performers 
with race records, and, as he and his sire are tied 
for third place among the 1909 sires, the chances are 
that Zombro in another season or two will rank even 
higher, as he now is enjoying opportunities that, 
while he remained in California all the time, were 
denied him. Silent Brook, another grandson of Alcy- 



one, has ten in the new list, and he gets a high rate 
of speed at the trot, as witness the public trial of his 
three-year-old son Billy Burke in 2:07% last fall. 

Of the sons of Baron Wilkes that appear above 
Moko is entitled to the palm, his get having so much 
quality, especially in colthood, they always are near 
the top. The first double Kentucky futurity winner, 
Fereno, was by Moko, and since then there has not 
been a season when one or more of the family was 
not prominent in colt stakes, the most wonderful 
trotter of them all — Native Belle 2:07% as a two- 
year-old — being the sensation of 1909. 

And now comes Mobel, son of Moko, wih five 2:30 
trotters for the year just closed. When it is added 
that the dam of that great trotter, The Harvester 
2:06%, is by Moko, the showing makes him rank high 
as a sire of early speed. 

Peter the Great had eleven trotters enter the list 
in 1909, and Moko had nine. As an offset to Native 
Belle at a two-year-old, Peter had a champion trotter 
in Miss Stokes 2:19%, and incidentally it may be 
said he is the only sire that has two yearling 
trotters in the 2:30 list, his other baby performer 
being Miss Green Goods 2:30. As showing some- 
thing of the respective merits as sires of early speed, 
based on the campaign of 1909, I have taken, first, 
the nine fastest of the eleven new ones credited to 
Peter the Great and compared them with the nine 
sired by Moko, and find the average speed of the 
Mokos to be 2:25%, while the nine fastest of the 
eleven sired by Peter the Great average 2:20y 2 . 
Looking at the matter from another viewpoint it is 
noted that Peter the Great had three two-year-olds 
enter the list in 1909, while Moko had two. But 
Peter also had a yearling that beat 2:20, and as it 
certainly is giving away a good deal to compare a 
yearling and a two-year-old by one sire with two two- 
year-olds by another sire, especially when one of the 
latter is a 2:07% trotter. This has been done. 

The two by Peter the Great are Eva Tanguay (2) 
2:16 1 / 2 , and Miss Stokes (1) 2:19%. Their average is 
2:17%. The two by Moko are Native Belle (2) 2:07%, 
and Colonel Osborne (2) 2:28%. Their average is 
2:18%. While, of course, the results of one season 
are by no means to be taken as a criterion of the 
relative merits of sires in this particular instance 
the comparison, involving as it does a champion 
yearling on one side and a champion two-year-old on 
the other, is interesting. 

Prodigal, which heads the 1909 list of sires based 
on new 2:30 trotters, is one of a trio of remakable 
brothers, the other two being Patron and Patronage. 
Prodigal and Patron were good trotters, the last 
named a star in colthood, and they took records re- 
spectively of 2:16 and 2:14%, while Patronage, no 
record, got into the limelight by siring a champion 
trotter in Alix 2:03%. All three brothers have done 
good work in the stud, and today their blood is the 
most prominent Mambrino Chief strain, in the male 
line, to be found, they having been sired by Pan- 
coast 2:21%, he by Woodford Mambrino 2:21%, the 
fastest son of Mambrino Chief, and likewise one of 
the best bred ones, as his dam. Woodbine, produced 
a great trotter in Wedgewood 2:19, although he was 
too hard gaited to succeed as a sire. 

That the Mambrino Chief blood still has potency 
in the production of trotting speed of a certain qual- 
ity is shown by Prodigal heading the above list, and 
the further fact that Parole, son of Patron, is the sire 
of seven new ones, while Patronage is represented 
by his son, Pactolus, sire of five. But the strain 
is not, in these days, one that wins many important 
races, although Pactolus has given the turf sonic 
good trotters. It is likely the daughters of these 
horses will excel the sons in the speed producing 
line, and already the Prodigal family has a fine start 
in that department, one of its members being the 
dam of the champion three-year-old trotter, Gen. 
Watts 2:06%. 

One of the topics of discussion among breeders 
this winter is the fact that the famous trotter and 
matron, Nancy Hanks 2:04 which was bred last 
spring to the untried stallion Brighton, is to have 
for her mate this year The Native 2:17% as a three- 
year-old, his principal claim to greatness, however, 
being the fact he is brother to Native Belle 2:07% as 
a two-year-old. 

Inasmuch as Nancy Hanks has, by various and 
sundry stallions, including a thoroughbred, presented 
the turf with some fast trotters, a couple of sires, and 
a broodmare which has to her credit a 2:11 trotter, 
it naturally would be supposed that he present owner, 
John E. Madden, would return the mare to one of 
them, say McKerron, as her produce by him was a 
colt trotter of merit — 2:18% as a two-year-old, and 
2:10% in the second heat of a winning race at three. 
Hut Madden, whose success with thoroughbred horses 
has been phenomenal, evidently has studied the 
breeding problem from just as many angles as his 
critics in the present case, and no doubt the declara- 
tion of Admiral Rous that he would sooner use the 
brother or the sister of a turf star, when looking 
for breeding material, than the celebrity himself 
made a deep impression on the owner of Nancy 
Hanks. Madden raced the three-year-old trotter, 
Slllko 2:11%. a horse that had everything but size 
to commend him as a sire, and after he bought Nancy 
Hanks he bred her to Brighton, brother of that horse, 
and I may add that he knew Brighton to be a fast 
trotter then, and later saw him able to beat 2:08. He 
recently bought. The Native because that horse is 
brother to ative Belle, the greatest trotter ever seen. 
That was carrying out logically the Rous dictum. 
But Madden also looked after another angle. He 
took pains to buy two stallions that not only were 
brothers to notable performers on the turf, but that 
likewise are superbly bred. 



That he intends heading his stud with those nags 
is patent, and, that being the case, there is no good 
reason why Nancy Hanks should not be mated with 
one of them. It is true that, as a yearling, a foal 
by any one of ha'f a dozen other stallions, sires of 
established reputation, would sell lor a good deal 
more than would a foal by Brighton or The Native, 
but Madden figures a good deal farther than the sale 
of one yearling from a mare whose position as a pro- 
ducer is assured. 

In order to show what Nancy Hanks has accom- 
plished as a broodmare the following list of her foals 
old enough to have been trained or tried in the breed- 
ing ranks, or both, is given. It tells an exceedingly 
interesting story in a fe.v' lines: 

By Bingen 2:06%— Admiral Dewey 2:04%, a sire. 

By Arion 2:07%— Lord Roberts 2:07%. a sire; 
Nation, dam of Vice Commodore 2:11, a sire. 

By J. A. McKerron 2:04% — Nancy McKerron (3) 
2:10%. 

By Peter the Great 2:07%— Markla (p) 2:18%. 
By Meddler (thoroughbred) — Princess of Monaco, 
a producer. 

Others of the produce of Nancy Hanks have shown 
enough to warrant the belief they will do their part 
on the turf or in the stud in sustaining the reputa- 
tion of the family, and if Madden desires to experi- 
ment along the line followed with success by other 
horsemen by using as sires the brothers of great 
performers themselves he assuredly could not have 
selected better material in the brood mare line than 
Nancy Hanks whose blood has shown itself to be 
remarkably plastic as well as uniformly potent. 

Madden has the courage to practice what he 
preaches, which, wben it comes to horse breeding, 
shows he believes his ideas are correct, and is will- 
ing to try them out at. the cost of immediate financial 
results. — Chicago Tribune. 

o 

THE AMERICAN HORSE. 



The light harness horse, when intelligently bred, 
is not surpassed in the matter of general utility. 
The thoroughbred is only valuable for what he can 
do on the turf or in the stud. The draft horse is 
only fitted for drawing heavy loads. The light har- 
ness horse is fitted for all the uses of man, except 
the drawing of extreme heavy weight. On the road 
and track he has no equal at his way of going; on 
the farm he is always useful; in the show ring, 
whether under the saddle or at all hitches, he cap- 
tures the ribbons, while in the parks he outshows 
and outstyles all other breeds. He is not only the 
horse of the century, but the horse of all the cen- 
turies. He is purely an American product, the con- 
ception of American genius and forethought, and 
American citizens are proud of him and his achieve- 
ments. He is the war horse which Job so vividly 
pictures in Holy Writ. Wherever he goes, whether 
it be to the icy North amid the snows of Alaska and 
Russia or to the burning sands of Africa, the Ameri- 
can trotter is found doing his duty. He is typical of 
the race which made him what he is — virile, intelli- 
gent, loyal, brave, determined, peaceful, except when 
aroused, and unconquerable. His evolution began in 
the middle of the nineteenth century, and this is the 
dawn of the twentieth. It has taken nearly 300 years 
to make the thoroughbred the magnificent horse he 
is today, and yet the border line of record speed 
between the two types of horses has been yearly nar- 
rowed to such an extent as to be amazing to those 
who have followed the career of each breed. What 
the light harness horse is and what he has accom- 
plished is history. There is nothing to indicate that 
his future will be less glorious than his past, but 
rather that his past and present activities are cer- 
tain hostages for greater triumphs yet to come. — 
L. D. Sale in Washington Herald. 

o 

WATERING HORSES. 

A leading veterinarian of London made a rule, 
based on his own experience, for watering horses. 
The best plan, he says, judging from experience and 
physiology, is to give horses all the water they 
choose to drink immediately they come in from 
work, and to let them have a constant supply of 
water in their stalls and boxes. If this latter provis- 
ion cannot be carried out, the animals should be 
given as much water as they will drink before each 
feed. He never takes the chill off the water, because 
the horses relish cold water more than water with 
the chill off. He says that in all his experience with 
horses he has never seen any ill-effect from water- 
ing horses according to the foregoing principles, 
which as he says, he has always found to be as sound 
in practice as they are good in theory. 

Prejudices die hard, and the hardest to die in the 
minds of grooms is that it is injurious to give a horse 
a drink of cold water when he is heated from exer- 
cise. In driving or riding horses long distances the 
best plan Is to water frequently. No mater how 
healed a horse is, a half-bucketful of cold water 
will not hurt him, particularly if he continues his 
exercise. To give a horse all the cold water he will 
drink when he is red-hot inside and out, we think 
would he deleterious to the last extent. Trainers 
of race horses In India give their steeds half a 
bucket of cold water imediately after a gallop, and 
with the best results as regards their appetite and 
health. On the other hand, we have seen numberless 
cases of colic in horses caused by drinking too much 
cold water when they were heated. Again, we have 
seen colic occur in horses from drinking water after 
being fed on occasions when they had, previous to 
eating, been deprived of water for some time. 



s 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1910. 



j ROD, GU N AND KENNEL I 

X CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT. | 



CALIFORNIA ANGLERS' ASSOCIATION. 



The fifth annual report of the Board of Directors 
shows that the club is In rather a prosperous con- 
dition. The club rooms are comfortable and con- 
veniently located. The officers of the club are: 
D. M. Sachs, president: Achille Roos, vice-president; 
Hon. Chas. M. Belshaw, second vice-president; W. 
R. Eaton, secretary; Western National Bank, treas- 
urer; Finance Committee, J. Boedefeld, J. Uri, J. Pin- 
cus; Board of Directors. George A. Went worth, Dr. 
Henry Abrahm, H. Gosliner. W. J. Street and George 
F. Roberts. 

The following excerpts from the annual report 
are of interest to sportsmen and anglers as an ex- 
ample of what can be accomplished by organiza- 
ation and systematic effort along the lines of fish 
and game protection and propagation. 

Legislation — Soon after the convening of the last 
session of the legislature, your Board selected Di- 
rector Wentworth to represent the Association in 
matters of legislation effecting the preservation of 
our game fishes and the interests of sportsmen 
anglers. Director Wentworth spent some eight 
weeks in constant attendance upon the legislature 
without compensation, other than his personal ex- 
[>enses. 

Matters of grave importance affecting the future of 
our game fishes as well as the liberty of the sports- 
man angler to follow his favorite pastime untram- 
meled by restrictive laws, were the subject of some 
83 different measures that were considered at the 
session. 

For the second time this Association has stood in 
the breach and unassisted, successfully combatted 
an attempt to pass a drastic trespass law that would 
in effect, if carried, make it a misdemeanor for one 
to go upon another's land for the purpose of fishing 
without first obtaining the owners consent. 

There is no law at present upon the books that 
makes it an offeiise for one to follow a stream, 
slough or other water while angling, but that there 
will be such a law in time in this State, there 
is no doubt whatever, unless the sportsmen anglers 
become awakened to a sense of a realization of their 
rights and be prepared to defend them. That subtile 
influences are at work to encompass the present 
rights of the sportsman angler and place him in the 
same position that his brother hunter has been since 
1895, there is no question of doubt in the minds of 
the members of your Board. It is up to the anglers 
themselves to preserve their present rights and this 
can only be done by united action. 

The owners of marsh lands bordering sloughs that 
have become famous for their bass fishing; those 
that own lands bordering favorite trout waters, as 
well as those who own lauds bordering other waters 
that are justly famous for their fine fishing, are all 
desirous for the enactment of a statute that will 
conserve their exclusive rights of possession by a 
trespass law that will restrict the people in their 
present rights and give them the opportunity of auc- 
tioneering off the fishing privilege to the highest 
bidder — the result being, fishing preserves lor those 
who can afford it and "back to the woods' for those 
who cannot afford to pay $100 a year and more for 
that which they now enjoy unfettered and untram- 
meled and without fear of a jail sentence. 

Upon the heel of these proposed trespass laws 
that have been introduced in the last two legis- 
lative sessions, we caused Assembly Constitutional 
Amendment No. 14 to be introduced. After a hard 
fight we were able to secure the necessary two-thirds 
votes in each house and it will now come before 
the people this November for ratification. It should 
be the duty of every member to make a strong fight 
for its adoption. 

Such an amendment as this should have been a 
part of the organic law of the State at its very incep- 
tion and before the public lands were sold, stolen 
and given away. 

As recent reports of the Department of the In- 
terior show that there are now some 33,156,877 
acres of public lands remaining in California, one 
can readily understand the importance of this pro- 
posed constitutional amendment; and it behooves 
every sportsman angler to interest himself in its 
adoption at the fall election. 

Aii'ong other measures of great importance that 
this Association accomplished at Sacramento were: 

Th<> securing of a two-months closed season upon 
striped bass to net fishermen and a non-sale of the 
fifh during such closed season; a closed season upon 
ahrimps; the defeat of a measure that sought to 
Amend Section 633 of the Penal Code by allowing net 
fishermen to stretch their nets two-thirds of the 
way across any river, stream or slough of the State 
Instead of one-third across the width of such water. 
The defeat of a trespass law aimed at anglers; 
amending the season for taking steelhead-trout 
above tide water so that the season commences on 
April 1st instead of May 1st; securing an amend- 
ment to the bill prohibiting the use of salmon or 
steelhead roe in the taking of trout, so that it does 
not apply to the use thereof in tide water. 

Upon the conclusion of the legislative session, 
your Board caused a compendium of the laws to 



be published and distributed the same in pamphlet 
form throughout the State. 

Our legislative work alone, if nothing more should 
prompt every angler in this city to become members 
of the Association. 

Stocking Streams — During the past year your 
Board has been active in looking out for the trout 
streams in close proximity to this city and in this 
connection we can say that we have had every 
support from the State Board of Fish and Game 
Commislsoners in such work. 

Fish planting occurred during the month of Sep- 
tember and some 360,000 trout fry distributed as 
follows: 50,000 in Pescadero vreek, 50,000 in San 
Gregorio creek, 60,000 in Purissmo creek, 50,000 in 
Paper Mill creek and its tributaries. 50,000 in So- 
noma creek and 50,000 in Austin creek and its trib- 
taries. 

Anglers' Field Day Event — For the past two years, 
under the auspices of the Association an Anglers' 
Field Day event has been held at Point Reyes in 
Marin county. These events have proved quite suc- 
cessful from every point of angle. At the last 
event held on the 25th of last April fully 1,000 peo- 
ple were in attendance. It should be the purpose 
of the Association to hold such events or similar 
events at least once a year or oftener. 

Your Board being desirous of stimulating good 
natured rivalry amongsst our members and for the 
further purpose of increasing our membership, has 
inaugurated a "Trophy Event," the details of which 
are in print and have been sent to the members. 

Amendments to the Laws — The present laws gov- 
erning the Association have been but slightly changed 
since they were first adopted. 

Your Board at its meeting adopted a resolution 
recommending to the members the adoption of the 
printed amendment to Article XI relative to delin- 
quent members. 

There are perhaps many changes that could be 
made in our laws for the betterment of the organiza- 
tion and the Board recommends that a committee of 
three or five be appointed upon a revision of the 
laws and that such committee be required to report 
at a special meeting of the Association to be held 
within the next three months. 

Summary — The Association is now entering upon 
the sixth year of its existence. It has accomplished 
much for the protection of our game fishes, and 
has accomplished much for the sportsmen anglers 
throughout the State. That the work so far accom- 
plished by the Association, stands as a high monu- 
ment to its founders and to its members, no one can 
truthfully gainsay. 

The work accomplished and the objects and pur- 
poses for which the Asociation is committed, should 
accentuate every angling sportsman to become mem- 
bers. 

In comparison with the large body of anglers that 
reside in this city and about the bay counties, this 
organization from a numercial standpoint of view, 
has but a small membership. 

Upon the closing of the charter on the 24th of 
February, 1905, the Association embraced 131 mem- 
bers. At the end of the first year (December 31st, 
1905) we had 141 members or a gain of 10 mem- 
bers. 

At the end of the second year, December 31st, 
1906, we had but 89 members, a loss of 52 members — 
the earthquake and fire were perhaps accountable 
for this decrease in membership. 

At the end of the third year, December 31st, 1907, 
we had 158 members, a gain of 69 members. 

At the end of the fourth year, December 31st, 1908, 
we had 178 members, a gain of 20 members; and 
at the end of the fifth year, December 31st, 1909, 
we had a total membership of but 189, a gain of 
but 11 members during the year; in all, a gain of 
but 58 members over the charter roll of February, 
1905. 

These figures are indcative of many things. They 
tend to show that club life amongst anglers in this 
city is not a popular thing. They show also, that 
the angler is either indifferent as to his position in 
the future with respect to angling, or else he can 
ill afford to contribute with us in united action for 
the betterment of our condition generally. 

Your Board is of the opinion that while our efforts 
before the legislature have been most successful, 
and while the Association has accomplished much 
for anglers generally, and while we believe that our 
work has been generally recognized, yet the fact 
remains that the Association has not increased in 
its membership as could be expected, and that the 
reason therefor is owing to what seems to be the 
selfishness of the angler who will not contribute his 
dollars with ours unless he can personally receive 
the same back through direct benefits. His thoughts 
are never upon the legislature, nor upon laws that 
are likely to be passed, restricting him in his pleas- 
ures, and he has absolutely forgotten the reasons 
why the hunters were put out of commission. His 
mind is upon immediate pleasures without any 
thought or care for tomorrow. 

When our State shall have followed in line with 
the States east of the Mississippi and with most 
of the States this side of that river, and adopt a 



stringent trespass law to be applied to fishing, then 
and not until then will the average angler awaken 
to a sense of realzation that in unity there is 
strength, but like the sportsman hunter, he will 
awaken when it is too late. 

In order to increase our membership, every mem- 
ber should undertake this year to bring in one new 
member. If the individual members of the Associa- 
tion would interest themselves more in the organ- 
ization towards its upbuilding, it would not be long 
before the Association would be a tower of strength 
throughout the State. 

o 

FRESNO'S FISH AND GAME. 



District Deputy Commissioner A. D. Ferguson re- 
cently made a tour of inspection through the valley 
counties in his district. He is quoted by the Fresno 
Republican as making the statement, that late this 
coming spring there will be distributed about 1000 
Chinese pheasants, from the State game farm at 
Haywards, among the farmers of his district. These 
birds will be kept in captivity for the purpose of 
propagation, 

From Superintendent Walter Fry he learned that 
the thirty-four Mexican wild turkeys liberated in 
Sequoia National Park, east of Three Rivers, in Tu- 
lare county, have done remarkably well, the condi- 
tions for their natural propagation being ideal and 
the birds evidently satisfied with their surroundings 
as to elevation, food and freedom from pursuit, as 
all shooting is absolutely prohibited in the park. 
These wild turkeys are young birds bred at the 
State farm and a hardy lot. 

Deputy Ferguson states that the activities of the 
State deputies throughout his district have been 
largely directed this season against the market 
hunters and the "bull hunters" and eleven arrests 
have been made with record convictions, or cases 
yet pending in three or four counties. Market hunt- 
ers in season and out of season slaughter for the San 
Francisco market, receiving for widgeon and small 
ducks from $2.50 to $3 a dozen and for sprig, mal- 
lard and the larger birds as high as $6 a dozen. 
"Bull hunters' comprise the class that approach the 
feathered game concealed behind a stalking bull 
at pasture and partially trained for the purpsoe, using 
at times also a bull's hide stretched on a frame and 
moved ahead as the hunter advances upon the game. 

In Kern county the deputies had four cases, two 
market hunters for having ducks in excess of the 
twenty-five limit and two for having ducks which 
were not killed by having been shot. These last two 
cases are now pending in Bakersfield. One of the 
excess baggers pleaded guilty and paid a fine of $25. 
the other forfeited his bail of $25 and fled, hut has 
since been re-arrested on bench warrant. 

In this connection, in the cases of Murphy and 
Grennan, Murphy acknowledged that he had 165 
ducks, not one of which had any evidence of shot 
mark, and he testified under oath that neither he 
nor any one else had shot them. The deputies exam- 
ined 100 of the ducks to find that not one had been 
shot, but all had their necks wrung. These ducks 
were intended for shipment to the San Francisco 
market and Kern county plentifully supplies the 
market with the web-footed birds, which market 
hunters gather in the northern part of the county 
about the artesian wells and overflow sloughs west 
of Salita and Wascoe. 

The fact that none of these birds showed sign of 
shot mark, leads to one of two conclusions. The 
birds were either poisoned by some preparation put 
out by the hunters, or subject to a disease which 
is epidemic at times and which it appears so ex- 
hausts the bird that it cannot rise above the water 
on the wing and thus becomes an easy prey to the 
hunter who gathers them in without the expendi- 
lure of any ammunition. In the case in question, 
Murphy stoutly denied that he had set out any 
preparation to sicken and benumb the birds, as the 
habits is with some market poachers, so that the con- 
clusion of Warden Ferguson is that the market 
hunter has no conscientious scruples to send diseased 
birds to market for the epicures of the city. A 
peculiarity of this disease is that the fat ducks are 
the first to succumb. 

Arrested at Alpaugh, in Tulare county, a hunter 
was fined $100 at Visalia for having 100 ducks in his 
possession, seventy-five above the legal limit. Dos 
Palos in Merced county contributed two cases of 
bull hunters for operating behind a live steer, also for 
hunting without licenses. The complaints on which 
the arrests followed were sworn to at Merced, but 
the defendants had their cases transferred for trial 
to La Grande. Los Banos contributed two bull 
hunters, also charged with misdemeanor for not 
having licenses. 

Deputy Newsom, who made the arrests of these 
bull hunters, was in turn arrested on complaint of 
the hunters made before justices of the peace for 
grand and petit larceny in taking possession as evi- 
dence of the shotguns and ducks in the possession of 
the accused. The charges against Newsom were 
dismissed by the district atorney as soon as he 
learned the facts and the justice of the peace at 
Los Banos apologized, stating that he entertained 
the petit larceny complaint under a misapprehension 
of the facts. 

Near Los Banos an arrest was also made of a 
hunter for shipping snipe to the San Francisco mar- 
ket, concealing the game in a basket. He was tried 
in Merced and fined $50. So also while at the Al- 
paugh swamp, a hunter named Beach was arrested 
to be returned to Monterey county, where he was 
wanted on a charge of shipping quail out of season 
concealed in egg cases. 



Saturday, January 29, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



In Fresno county, says "Warden Ferguson, few 
infractions have come to notice, because the legiti- 
mate hunting fraternity is much larger and more 
on the alert for violators of the law. The most 
favorable hunting grounds are also under lease to 
clubs and the territory for the predatory market 
hunter is limited. 

The infractions are principally by foreigners, espe- 
cially Japanese, and presumably because of their 
ignorance of the law. But even they are learning 
by experience end the imposing of fines of $500 for 
dynamiting fish in two instances has had a most 
salutary effect as regards this class of offenders. 

Fish prospects in the county are good and Warden 
Ferguson does not fear that the winter freshets 
would have destructive effect on the young trout 
that were planted to restock the depleted mountain 
streams. The run of salmon in the San Joaquin 
last season was appreciable, nature coming to the 
aid of the fish and the high water making it easy 
for the fish to pass the dam obstructions at Mendota 
and at the other streams where the ascent of the 
salmon to the spawning grounds has been blocked 
in previous seasons by dams and low water. 

SANTA CRUZ FISH AND GAME. 



Game Warden Walter Welch's annual report, cov- 
ering the year ending December 31, 1909, filed re- 
cently with the county e'erk, makes interesting 
reading on the subject of game protection. 

Among other things Welch's report states: 

The general supply of fish and game in the 
county is increasing, deer, tree squirrels, rabbits 
and clams being particularly noticeable. 

About 150 deer were killed during the past open 
season, as against 100 during 1908, and between 40 
and 50 during 1907. Many hundreds of deer of both 
sexes still remain. 

Predatory birds and animals have made inroads 
into the number of quail. Quail have also been 
much disturbed by deer hunters during August. 

Trout fishing has been as good as in former years. 

Salmon fishing in the bay has far excelled any 
of the previous four years. The black bass in Kelly 
and Pinto lakes, near Watsonville, have thrived 
and fishing is good, bass weighing as much as 6 
pounds have been caught. Many outside anglers 
have been attracted by the black bass. The limit 
of size in clam digging has largely increased the 
supply during the past three years. 

Four hundred and fifty-five permits to blast wood 
and burn brush were issued in 1909. Forest fires 
last fall did much damage to property, the water- 
shed and game cover, and killed many birds and 
animals. The county, it is suggested, should buy 
sufficient axes, shovels, brush-hooks and mattocks 
and locate supplies at available points, giving all 
possible encouragement to fire fighters. 

The report concludes with the statement that in 
spite of the confusion caused by the controversy over 
his position and the rights of supervisors to add to 
the state game restrictions the sentiment for con- 
servation is steadily growing. 

Mr. Welch thanks the press and those, supervisors 
who have aided him through many disappointments 
and discouragements in protecting the wild life of 
the county and says if the people will continue to 
interest themselves in game protection, much 
progress can be achieved. 

Mr. Welch has continued to act as warden since 
his alleged removal took place on June 1, without 
pay other than the fund subscribed by friends of 
game protection. 

Four arrests were made by Mr. Welch during 1909, 
resulting in a total of $125 in fines. Two arrests 
have been made since January 1. Fines $25. 

o 

GUN BARRELS BURSTING. 



Several cases of bursted or bulged gun barrels 
have come under my observation at different times. 
Some of these blow-ups were, it was claimed, due 
to some obstruction in the barrel. Some of these 
accidents happened whilst on an auto trip, the guns 
being fired from the machine. This would pre- 
clude any possibility of any substance other than the 
wads, getting into the barrel. 

I cannot say myself that, sometimes it may happen 
that the hard cardboard wad over the powder is left 
sticking on edge in the barrel after a discharge. I 
have thought so, at times, by the sound of the report, 
"or what was it?" 

In experimenting along these lines I took an old 
Remington 12 gauge having decarbonized barrels I 
used U. M. C. steel-lined shells, U. M. C. wads, 
drams Du Pont smokeless, 1% ounce of No. 8 shot. 
I took the old gun down to the river bank one day, 
with my cleaning rod I pushed a U. M. C. shot wad 
edgeways into one barrel until it was about three 
inches from the muzzle. I fired the right barrel. 
The same peculiar report that I had noticed pre- 
viously followed the trigger pull. I then examined 
the barrel carefully, but it was evidently as sound 
as ever. 

The left barrel was treated in the same manner, 
I could not find a bulge or any indication of damage. 
I would not have been more surprised had the test 
been made with the best grade of barrels and they 
had stood it the same way. Those decarbonized 
barrels on the old Remington proved, very plainly, 
that good gun barrels were made in the United 
States by the old makers. Some time I shall try 
what Belgian barrels will show under this test. 

"ALMO." 

Roswell, N. M. 



NEW MEXICO WILL BE A SPORTSMAN'S 
PARADISE. 

New Mexico may, with care on the part of its offi- 
cials, assistance on the part of genuine sportsmen, 
and rigid enforcement of its game laws, become the 
sportsman's paradise of America within a very few 
years. It has ideal breeding grounds for all ciasses 
of wild game, great and small, native to the Rocky 
mountain region. Its streams are the most perfect 
in temperature, volume and location for the success- 
ful propagation of trout, and other cold water game 
fish. 

It requires only protection for the period of a few 
short years and the wild game of this territory, to- 
gether with its perfect climate and magnificent 
scenery will be attracting the attention of the hunt- 
ers and fishermen of the continent. 

These are the conclusions reached by Col. Thomas 
P. Gable, territorial game warden, after nine months 
in the office during which, for the first time, he has 
made not only efficient, but more than self support- 
ing; a producer of revenue for the territory. 

Col. Gable has done more. He has made the new 
game law, adopted by the legislature of 1909 so 
effective, that it has attracted the attention of the 
men and magazines of the country which are inter- 
ested in the protection and propagation of game 
and fish and is resulting in no little advertising of 
the territory's resources. 

Not satisfied with protecting existing game and 
fish the game warden is determined to see that every 
stream in New Mexico, where game fish can live, 
is stocked and to this end he is working not only 
for a national fish hatchery, but for a territorial 
one as well, which he hopes to construct from funds 
derived from hunting and fishing licenses. 

During the year 1909 the game warden's office 
issued a total of 5600 licenses, bringing into the 
office a total of $7000, or far more than sufficient 
to pay all expenses of salaries and operation. 

New licenses for 1910 are now being prepared and 
with the license machinery in full operation It is 
probable that the number of licenses issued during 
this year will be doubled. 

The game warden's pet plant just now is a terri- 
torial fish hatchery at Santa Fe, adapted especially 
to the propagation of mountain trout. The attorney 
general has not yet determined that the revenue 
of the office may be used for this purpose, but the 
warden believes it can. Anyway he is making his 
plans for the hatchery and will build it sooner or 
later. 

In his report to the governor for 1909 the game 
warden says in part: 

Upon assuming the office of territorial game and 
fish warden on April 1, I found a law had been 
passed by the thirty-eighth legislative assembly, 
known as the "License Law." This law being en- 
tirely new to the people of the territory, necessi- 
tated a great amount of printing, together with 
considerable postage and labor, to get it before the 
public. While this is a new law to the people of 
New Mexico, it has been in use a great many years 
in the different States, and the strongest argument 
in its favor is the fact that that in no instance has 
it been repealed, but on the contrary has been 
strengthened, from time to time, as the people be- 
came better acquainted with the benefits to be 
derived therefrom. In order to acquaint the people 
of the territory with the provisions of this law, I 
had published ten thousand English and ten thousand 
Spanish copies in pamphlet form, as well as fifteen 
thousand synopsis cards in English and Spanish, 
also five thousand cloth posters containing a syn- 
opsis of the law in both English and Spanish, these 
were sent to all county clerks, deputy game wardens, 
forest reserve supervisors and guards, teachers at 
the various Indian pueblos and villages, as well as 
the individuals and newspapers of the territory, for 
their information and distribution, in addition to this 
I have mailed over five hundred circular letters, and 
written several hundred in answer to inquiries. This 
with the hearty and generous support given by the 
press of the territory, in publishing the laws with 
favorable comments thereon, has rendered this de- 
partment great assistance. Public sentiment will do 
more to protect this valuable territorial asset, than 
the most stringent laws. I have therefore in every 
manner possible endeavored to convince the people, 
that in protecting the game and fish they are pro- 
tecting their own interests, and no matter how 
remote his residence no one has any excuse for not 
being acquainted with all its Important provisions. 
Some difficulty has been experienced by my prede- 
cessors in having the pueblo and reservation Indians 
comply with the law, they believing that the game 
and fish were the property of any who captured 
them, whether in or out of season; this sentiment 
does not seem to exist among the native or Spanish 
population, in fact some of the best deputies I have 
in the territory are of this people. Valuable; assist- 
ance has been rendered this department by the super- 
intendent and teachers of the Indians in advising and 
informing them of the provisions of the law. 

The prevailing opinion has been that the game pro- 
tection laws were made solely for the benefit and in 
the interest of the rich man, this is a mistake, the 
rich man is not confined to any particular locality 
for his sport, as the entire country is open to him, 
while the poor man or the man of average means, 
who is unable to undergo the expense of traveling 
any great, distance, must depend entirely for the 
sport of hunting and fishing, within his own locality, 
hence the law is of much greater benefit to the poor 
man. Opposition to the game protection laws, is 
usually actuated by selfish motives and those who 



oppose them lose no opportunity to herald abroad 
the slightest violation and usually magnify every 
infraction, hoping thus to discredit the entire system 
of game protection. I am pleased to report, how- 
ever, that the people throughout the territory, as 
they become better acquainted with the law and its 
intent, are not only cheerfully observing the same 
but are complimenting the wisdom of its enactment. 

The system of non-resident licenses, practically 
began in the United States in 1895, since which time 
nearly all the States and territories have adopted 
the plan; the fees for licenses vary in different 
States, ranging from $1 to $5 lor residents, and $15 
to $100 for non-residents and aliens, the fee of $1 
for bird and $1 for big game, and $25 for non- 
esidents, as charged by New Mexico, is quite rea- 
sonable, and in my opinion will, after this year, 
create a fund which will not only maintain the office 
of game warden, but leave a balance sufficient to 
construct and support at least one fish hatchery in 
the territory, which is becoming more and more nec- 
essary each year. Hon. G. W. Bowers, Commissioner 
Bureau of Fisheries, Washington, D. C, also Delegate 
W. H. Andrews, are giving the people of New Mexico 
every assistance possible, by way of furnishing fish 
for stocking not only the trout streams, but also 
private lakes and reserves. Owing to the fact, how- 
ever, that a great many of the choicest trout streams, 
are located long distances from the railway stations, 
it is quite difficult to transport successfully the 
young fish from the fish car, sent out annually by 
the government to the waters, many of which are 
at this time sadly in need of restocking. 

Since the enactment of the game and fish laws in 
March, 1903, there has been quite a perceptible in- 
crease in game and game birds. New Mexico is 
naturally a game country, and is especially favored, 
by having within its borders large forest reserves, 
which has an abundance of game and fish, and is 
being constantly guarded by "forest rangers," and 
their assistance in enforcing the game laws, is of 
great benefit to this department; in a very few years 
these great reserves will be the envy of the whole 
country, and New Mexico can truthfully boast of 
having the largest and best stocked game and fish 
preserves in the world. The department of agri- 
culture through the Hon. Gifford Pinchot, has issued 
special instructions to "all forest officers (regula- 
tion 74) to co-operate with the State or Territorial 
officials so far as they can without undue interfer- 
ence with their regular forest work, to enforce local 
laws for the protection of game, etc." 

Reports from deputy wardens show these reserves 
already well stocked with deer, grouse and wild 
turkeys, in the northern and western portion of the 
territory, the southern and eastern part has several 
bands of antelope and great quantities of quail, in 
Roosevelt and Quay county, large numbers of 
prairie chickens are reported, these being protected 
until 1915. It is hoped they will becoome more gen- 
erally distributed throughout the territory. Pheas- 
ants have been imported into Colfax, Bernalillo and 
Grant counties by private parties and are reported 
doing well. There are still a few ptarmigan (white 
grouse) reported in the Taos range, also wild pig- 
eons exist in Taos and Rio Arriba counties. I have 
reports of a band of mountain sheep in the Guada- 
lupe mountains, on the line between Texas and New 
Mexico. Also a few have been seen recently near 
the Truchas Peaks in Rio Arriba county. Sonora 
white tailed deer are reported quite numerous in 
the Mogollon mountains, these have evidently drifted 
in from Mexico, where they exist in great numbers. 
There are many prosperous colonies of beaver re- 
ported in Colfax, with a few in Taos and Rio Arriba 
counties. 

o 

Coyote Petards — A recent press dispatch from Spo- 
kane gives the following account of the novel method 
used by a mining prospector in destroying coyotes and 
other predatory animals in the section of central 
Washington where he is located.. There is one thing 
lacking, however, to make the system entirely clear, 
the immediate cause of the dealth dealing explo- 
sion is not explained. He uses nitro-gycerine, and 
has already collected more than $25(1 in bounties on 
scalps brought to the office of the Auditor of Kittitas 
county since January 1. 

While at Kllensburg with a wagon-load of pelts the 
other day, he told a number of sportsmen and 
habitues at the court house the secret of his success 
as a bounty-earner, saying: 

"I'm out in the hills prospecting most of the time, 
and my only companions are the coyotes and other 
wild things. In this instance the coyote is worth 
money only when dead, and is nothing more or less 
than an annoyance while alive. 

I haven't the time to hunt coyotes, but to make 
a little 'easy money' and at the same time rid the 
district of some of the nuisances, I 'load' pieces of 
meat with nitro-glycerine, such as I use in blasting 
the ore-bearing rock, and scatter the tidbits near the 
coyotes' haunts in the hills. 

The coyotes come along, sometimes singly, but 
more often In twos, three and in packs; they find 
the meat, and as it looks good to em they gulp it 
down, and then — it Is all over with 'em. 

The explosive kills instantly, but does not injure 
the pelt enough to prevent the county auditor from 
jiaying the bounty of $1 each, as provided by the 
State law. 

I've killed hundreds of these pests in my time, and 
I expect to 'bag' many more before the end of the 
year. The game is worth while, for I not only get 
the bounty, but also help the farmers and stock- 
growers in getting rid of their worst enemies." 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1910. 



OUTDOOR RIFLE SHOOTING FOR SCHOLBOYS. 

The success of the recent outdoor schoolboy rifle 
meeting in the District of Columbia has shown how- 
easy it is to work up interest in this sport among the 
boys when concerted effort is put forth. Most of the 
credit is due to Lieutenant Albert S. Jones, sec- 
retary of the National Rifle Association, who organ- 
ized the tournament, but he found that the officers 
of the army, marine corps and National Guard of 
the District of Columbia, as well as a number of 
patriotically inclined civilians had only to be asked 
in order to contribute their time, efforts and money, 
to encourage the schoolboy work. 

A brief sketch of how this tournament was 
arranged and carried to a successful conclusion, will 
be of interest to other cities. The first step was to 
secure the loan of the District of Columbia range 
and the co-operation of the National Guard officers 
as instructors and range officers. This co-operation 
was most heartily given. The War Department was 
then approached on the subject of arms and ammuni- 
tion. Washington is peculiarly situated in that it has 
a well organized and well drilled cadet corps and 
under the law the War Department can furnish the 
corps with arms and ammunition. A sufficient num- 
ber of rifles was borrowed from the War Department 
and some five thousand or ten thousand rounds of 
ammunition secured. General Elliott, commander of 
the marine corps, placed at the disposal of the offi- 
cers of the match the services of an entire company 
of marines to act as markers and scorers, the non- 
commissioned officers present assisting in instructing 
the boys and guarding against accidents. 

In addition, several officers from the army and 
marine corps volunteered their services. President 
Taft, who as Secretary of War had more than once 
signalized his approval of rifle practice, sent Lieut. 
Jones a telegram which read: ,- I approve the teach- 
ing under proper regulations of rifle shooting to our 
boys in advanced grades." 

The co-operation of the Washington press was 
solicited and the local newspapers took a most active 
interest in the affair. The publicity thus gained was 
of great advantage in arousing the interest of the 
schoolboys and of the citizens. The school board 
assisted in every possible way and the athletic and 
military instructors took a prominent part in the 
preliminary work and in the tournament itself. A 
canvas was made of a number of prominent citizens, 
each being asked for a small contribution which 
resulted in a sum of money to defray the expenses. 
Several of the local newspapers donated cups and 
other cups and medals were given by merchants, 
brok'-rs and hotels. Secretary of War Dickinson, in 
addition to heartily approving the shoot, gave a 
medal, as did Assistant Secretary of War Oliver and 
General William Crozier, Chief of Ordnance. The 
Washington Chamber of Commerce and the Du Pont 
Powder Company also gave prizes and a local firm 
donated the program. Ten cents per card was 
charged and the balance received over the expenses 
was turned over to the school board to further rifle 
practice in the schools. 

The liveliest interest was manifested by the boys. 
Although it was dark and cold, more than 300 
youngsters turned out to participate in the matches. 
Some forty or fifty officers were on hand. 

The shooting was all at 200 yards with the regula- 
tion military rifle and ammunition, some of it being 
off-hand and some prone. The matches were: Inter- 
school championship; high school cadet corps com- 
pany championship; interclub match; Individual 
championship; high school cadet corps members 
(N. R. A.) and the N. R. A. medal matches. 

The distribution of the prizes, which took place 
at the Western Higli School, was made quite an 
event. Capt. James P. Oyster, president of the 
school board, presided. Secretary of War Dickinson 
presented the prizes and made a strong speech sup- 
porting the policy of educating the school boys to the 
intelligent use of the rifle. Mr. W. F. Gude, president 
of the Washington Chamber of Comemrce, presented 
the trophy given by that organization and other 
addresses were made by Gen. James A. Drain, 
president of the National Rifle Association, Chief 
Clerk J. C. Schofield, of the War Department, and 
others. As the result of the indoor tournaments 
which have been held here for the past two years 
under the auspices of the National Rifle and Revolver 
Club, and the recent outdoor shoot under the auspices 
of the National Rifle Association great interest has 
been taken by the Washington school boys in rifle 
practice. Each of the five high schools now has a 
well established rifle club and a range is being con- 
structed at the Central High School. 

What has been done in Washington cannot be 
duplicated possibly in all large cities, but in a num- 
ber of them the same methods would doubtless be 
successful. It is understood the National Militia 
Hoard will recommend that National Guard organ- 
izations place their ranges at the disposal of the 
school boys from time to time for practice and that 
the officers of the National Guard assist in instruct- 
ing the boys. A bill has been introduced in Congress 
providing for the encouragement of rifle practice 
among school boys and civilian clubs which has 
received the endorsement of the War Department 
and which will doubtless be endorsed by the national 
Rifle Association and the National Board for the 
Promotion of Rifle Practice. In many Slates there 
are detachments of marines, coast artillery and of 
the regular army, where markers and scorers could 
likely be obtained without much trouble or expense. 
Indoor shoots have been held in New York, Phila- 
delphia, Boston, Denver, as well as in Washington 



and increasing interest is reported from other cities. 
I'p to the present time the work has been conducted 
by private individuals but it is more than probable 
the government will before long give it substantial 

recognition. 

o 

GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



A Specimen Game Hcg — Joseph Barbato, who has 
been hunting ducks at Tudor, Sutter county, for some 
time, was arrested in Sacramento last week by Dep- 
ity Game Warden M. A. Carpenter of Marysville 
and Constable Russell of Broderick, states the Bee. 
The warrant alleged that Barbato has been violating 
the game laws and hunting without a license. 

Barbato has been shipping ducks to San Francisco 
and Sacramento, doing a flourishing business, and 
the olficers believe he was preparing to inaugurate 
a plan for shipping ducks in milk cans under the 
guise of carrying on a dairy business. He went to 
Sacramento to engage in the milk business and was 
arrested at the Wells, Fargo office while sending 
a can of milk. 

When arrested he declared that he was part owner 
of a ranch at Tudor, and that he was privileged to 
kill ducks because they were ruining his crops. 
The officers found that there were no crops on the 
place and that he had arranged a huge tank from 
which to do his killing. 

Barbato wrote to the Fish Commission some time 
ago asking permission to kill unlimited numbers of 
ducks up to 2500 because they were ruining his 
crops. Carpenter was delegated to investigate the 
matter and the arrest of Barbato followed. 

He gave bonds in the sum of $100 and will appear 
before Justice Tucker of Yuba City for a hearing. 



Woman Kills a Bear. — Throwing snowballs into 
the hollow of an oak tree to rout out a coon, as she 
supposed, Mrs. Chamberlain, wife of the forest super- 
visor stationed at Minersville, routed out a big black 
bear. She was alone at the time, save for her dog. 
She killed the bear, which weighed 300 pounds. Mrs. 
Chamberlain rode horseback from Minersville to 
Weaverville, making the first trip over the mountain 
following a fresh fall of snow. It is a lonely ride of 
twenty-eight miles, there being scarcely a human 
habitation on the road. As is her habit when riding 
abroad, she carried her rifle and was accompanied 
by her dog. On the road to Weaverville she saw 
fresh bear and panther tracks in the snow. These 
caused her no alarm for she is an experienced 
hunter and is handy with her rifle. But it was on 
her return trip to Minersville that she had the experi- 
ence of her life. As she rode along over the moun- 
tain her dog showed by its actions at the base 
of a hollow tree that some animal was inside. Mrs. 
Chamberlain thought of nothing but coons. Dis- 
mounting, she set her rifle down and made snow- 
balls which she threw into the hollow to rout the 
coon. The snowballs did their work, but instead 
of a coon out came a big black bear. Bruin was 
coming in high dudgeon, too. He came right down 
the tree and started for Mrs. Chamberlain. But the 
dog broke in and succeeded in driving the bear up 
another tree. Then it was, while the dog kept him 
at hay, that Mrs. Chamberlain fired one shot that 
brought the beast tumbling down the tree and dead 
at the huntress' feet. 



Big Game Numerous. — Bear and panther, for some 
reason, are hugging the settlements this winter, rather 
out of the ordinary. Two bears were seen within a 
half mile of Greenview, Siskiyou county, by Atterbery 
brothers recently. The men had no rifle, but has- 
tened to procure one and about two hours after first 
sighting the bear, took up the trail. Night came on 
and they lost the track near Scott river, about a 
mile from the Fort. 

A monster bear's track was discovered on the 
Kidder, just west of Greenview, one foot evidently 
having been in a trap that, severed the toes. The 
size of the tracks leave no doubt of its being a 
grizzly, and hunters are fitting out to follow. 

Grant Lewis got on the trail of a panther that, 
judging by the track, was a lusty brute. He fol- 
lowed it for some miles and lost the trail near the 
Wilson home, three miles west on the Kidder creek. 
As Lewis is a fine shot and a first-class hunter, it is 
safe to say he will yet give this cat a run for its life. 



New Gun Clubs — Kingsburg, Cal.. now has a gun 
club which was recently organized. E. W. Pinkley 
is president and J. W. Mclntyre secretary. It is ex- 
pected the membership roll will number about 50 
shooters. An active blue rock campaign is sched- 
uled. 

The Yavapai Gun Club is the most recently formed 
organization for hunting and fishing near Prescott, 

Arizona. 

A lease has been made of a large strip of country 
at Point of Rocks. The land rented contains several 
Bmall lakes on which duck hunting is good and the 
land is broken with hills and valleys, making it ideal 
for quail and rabbits. The lakes are to be stocked 
with fish. Poachers will be dealt with through the 
courts. 



An Old Friend Coming. — Jack Fanning will pay a 
flying visit to this city early in February. Jack has 
a host of friends, not only in this city, but all over 

the Coast. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



COMING EVENTS. 

Uenoh Show*. 

Jan. 26-29 — Cleveland fanciers' Club Company. (Li- 
censed.) Cleveland, O. J. T. Conkey, Sec'y. 

Feb. 8-11 — Fanciers' Association of Indiana. In- 
dianapolis. Ind. C. K. Millliousc. Sec'y. Kntries 
close Feb. 1. 

Feb. 9-12 — Westminster Kennel Club. New York 
City. Wm. Rauch, Chairman. 

Feb. 22-25 — New England Kennel Club, Boston. Cbas. 
W. Taylor Jr., Sec'y. 

March 1-3 — Pine Tree Kennel Club. Portlan.l, Me. 
Elinor S. Moody, Sec'y. 
March 1-4 — Buffalo Kennel Club. Buffalo, N. Y. 
Seymour P. White, Sec'y. 

March 2-4 — Central New York Kennel Association. 
Utica. N. Y. Thos. S. Jackson. Sec'y. 

March 8-11 — Erie Kennel Club. Erie, Pa. Lyman 
T. Whitehead, Sec'y. 

March 16-19 — Duquesne Kennel Club of Western 
Pennsylvania. Pittsburg, Pa. B. Cummings. 
Sec'y. 

March 23-26— Kodak City Kennel Club. Rochester 

N. Y. Jos. H. Church, Sec'y. 
March 21-24 — Chicago Kennel Club. Chicago, 111. F. 

A. Fisher, Sec'y. 
June 1-2 — Ladies' Kennel Association of America. 

Minneola, L. I., N. Y. Mrs. R. C. W. Wadsworth, 

Sec'y. . 

June 2-3 — Long Island Kennel Club. . 

E. H. Berendsohn, Sec'y. 
June 8 — Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts. 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. Mrs. II. M. Talbot, Sec'y. 
June 18 — Westchester Kennel Club. . 

Louis Contoit, Sec'y. 

Field Trials. 

Jan. 11 — United States Field Trial Club. Rogers 
Springs, Tenn. W. B. Stafford, Sec'y. Grand Junc- 
tion, Tern. 

Ian. — National Championship Field Trial Associa- 
tion. To follow II. S. trials. Rogers Springs, Tenn. 
W. B. Stafford Sec'y. Grand Junction, Tenn. 

Ian. 24 — Pacific Coast Field Trials Club, Bakersfleld, 
Cal. E. Courtney Ford, Sec'y, San Francisco, Cal. 

Ian. 26 — North Texas Field Trial Association. Fort 
Worth, Tex. C. T. Hodge, Sec'y. 

Feb. 1 — Lone Star Field Trial Club. San Antonio, Tex. 
E. M. Ford, Sec'y. 

Spearing Steelhead. — The illegal practice of spear- 
ing steelhead is still in vogue in San Mateo county. 
The Coast streams of this county have for many 
years past been favorite resorts for many anglers. 
It seems a bit odd that hotel keepers, liverymen 
and other business interests that profit directly and 
indirectly through the visits of sportsmen to the 
county, do not combine in missionary work to the 
purpose, that it is better for all concerned to observe 
the law and not kill off spawning fish by spearing 
them. 

o 

U. M. C. Notes. 

Little is said and done at this time of year in the 
way of trap shooting on the Pacific Coast. Every 
lover of dog and gun is giving his spare time to the 
delights of marsh and field shooting, or the pursuit 
of big game. Writing from the northwest, a corre- 
spondent advises us that hardly a gun has been fired 
at targets since the last shot was heard at the 
Pacific Indian meet at Medford, when J. G. Naquin, 
of Globe, Ariz., and J. E. Cullison. of Portland, 
walked away with the first and second amateur hon- 
ors, well ahead of the field. 

It is to be regretted that, under the rulings of the 
Inter-State Association as to the number of targets 
required to be shot for record, few it any shooters 
in the Northwest can get official standing in the 
annual review of the year's work, now soon to appear. 
Were it not for this fact, many good records wou'd 
appear therein as reflecting the able devotion to the 
manly sport in the Pacific and northwest territory. 
As it is, however, we are the more impressed with 
the specially good individual wins recorded at vari- 
ous important meets. Among these may be cited 
Sherman Johnson's winning of several trophies, in- 
cluding the U. C. T. championship badge, at the 
Idaho State shoot; Jack Cullison's wonderful finish 
ahead of the great field of amateurs at the annual 
Northwest shoot at Walla Walla; Clarence McLean's 
winning of the championship of British Columbia, at 
Vancouver, and Guy Dering's fine feat at the Pacific 
Coast Hajidicap at Seattle, when, coming fxs a 
stranger from the East, he cleaned up the entire 
field of amateurs with a loss of only ten birds on regu- 
lar distances for the week. All these winners 
achieved the acme of success with the U. M. C. steel- 
lined Arrow and Nitro Club shells. Carl Adelman's 
and Jno. Noel's wins of the two big handicaps at 
Seattle with the same combination has previously 
been advertised to the world. Nor were the new 
Remington guns, pumps and autoloading, less con- 
spicuous in these fine wins, in the hands of McLean 
and Adelman, and of our old-time friend, R. G. Rob- 
inson, at Nelson, and of Hughie McElroy, of Spokane, 
when he put the whole crowd at the big Anaconda 
handicap in his game sack, to the tune of 98 out of 
100 from the handicap rise. 

o 

A New Peters Representative. 

Mr. Woolfolk Henderson, of Lexington, Ky., who 
has been known as one of the leading amateur trap 
shooters of the country for two or three years pust, 
joined on January 1, 1910, the professional ranks, as 
a representative of The Peters Cartrridge Company, 
shooting Peters shells and Du Pont powder. 

Mr. Henderson's scores during 1909 indicate very 
exceptional ability, and this with his consistent loy- 
alty to Peters ammunition have their logical result 
in his employment by the Peters Company. He is 
sure to add rapidly to the already long list of friends 
he has made for himself and the goods he will rep- 
resent. 

— — o 

During the week from January 7th to 14th, Mr. L. I. 
Wade, shooting at Austin and San Antonio, Texas, 
broke 331 out of 350, an average of 94.57 per cent, 
with a run of 120. He used Peters factory loaded 
shells. 



Saturday, January 29, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



II 



THE FARM 



NOTES OF THE HOG LOT. 



As the science of feeding is better 
onderstood, breeders will be compelled 
to breed hogs of a type that will fat- 
ten easily and acres of clover and 
alfalfa, soy beans, rape and the like 
will rotate with corn and help the 
farmers to grow a hog possessing size 
and quality at a very low cost. The 
time is coming when the ideals of the 
packer and breeder will be similar. 

The nests where the pigs sleep 
should be slightly elevated so that no 
dampness will accumulate, or they are 
sure to be afflicted with rheumatism, 
soreness of the feet and joints, and 
lack of thrift. 

If the nests are made in this man 
ner the pigs will keep them clean for 
a much longer period than when they 
are once allowed to become foul and 
damp. The pig gets discouraged in 
trying to keep neat if his pen is al 
lowed to become foul and damp. 



HOW TO KNOW WHAT A COW IS 
WORTH. 



It is impossible to appreciate the 
money-making difference between good 
and poor cows, and good and poor 
herds, without a definite study of the 
separate elements of cost and profit, 
based upon the actual production ot 
the individual cow. Prof. Wilbur J. 
Fraser, chief in dairy husbandry at 
the University of Illinois, after years 
of investigation and the testing of 
1,200 cows in Illinois, has recently 
published (as circular 134) an entirely 
new and valuable "Cow Index of Keep 
and Profit." One thing the dairyman 



must know: the cow's production of 
milk and butterfat for the year. Then 



THE BEST LINIMENT 

OR PAIN KILLER FOR THE HUMAN BODY 

^ Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 

IT HAS NO EQUAL 



F«f — " '* Penetrat- 

rUI Ing.iootbing and 

healing, and for all Old 

the 

Exteri.. 

Human 

CAUSTIC 

Body 



Felons 
Exterior Cancers, Boils 
ns and 
n i o ns 
CAUSTIC BALSAM has 
no equal as 
a Liniment. 



We would say to 
who buy it (hat it does 
lot contain a particle 
of poisonous substance 
and therefore no harm 
can result from its ex- 
ternal use. Persistent, 
thorough use will cure 
many old or chronic 
ailments and it can be 
used on any case that 
requires an outward 
application with 
perfect safety. 



Perfectly Sate 
and 

Reliable Remedy 
for 

Sore Throat 
Chest Cold 
Backache 
Neuralgia 
Sprains 
Strains 
Lumbago 
Diphtheria 
Sore Lungs 
Rheumatism 
and 
all Stiff Joints 



REMOVES THE SORENESS -STRENGTHENS MUSCLES 

Cornhill, Tex.— "One bottle Caustic Balsam did 

my rheumatism more good than $1'20.00 paid in 
doctor'ibills." OTTO A. BEYER. 

Price • 1 .60 per bottle. Sold by druggists, or sent 
by u> express prepaid. Write for Booklet R. 

The LAWRENCE-WILLIAMS COMPANY. Cleveland. 0. 



SIRE OF SOLANO BOY 2:07>/4 FOR 
SALE. 

The stallion FATHER McKINNON, 

by Demonio 2:11%, sire of Mona Wilkes 
2:03%, etc., dam Elorita by Alban 2:24, 
sire dam of You Bet 2:07, second dam 
Emma R. 2:28y 2 , dam of Rowena 2:29V 2 
and Emaline 2:27%, by Electioneer, 
third dam Emma Robson, thoroughbred, 
dam of 4 trotters in 2:30, by Wood- 
burn, is offered for sale. Father Mc- 
Kinnon is the sire of that good race 
horse Solano Boy 2 : 7 Vi ■ Write for 
price and particulars. 

J. S. LOCKIE, Fairfield, Cal. 



McKinney Speed 2:02. 



TWO COOP OWES. 



Demonio Speed 2:03 , 



Gen. J. B. Frisbie 41637 

Handsome son of McKinney 2:11'4, greatest sire of the age (22 with records from 
2:02 to 2:10); dam the great broodmare Daisy S. (dam of Tom Smitli 2:13%, sire 
of Katalina 2:11V4. General Vallejo 2:22%, Little Mac (3) 2:27, Sweet Rosle 2:28%, 
Vallejo Girl 2:10i4. and Prof. Heald 2:23) by McDonald Chief 3583, son of Clark 
Chief 89; second dam Fanny Rose, great broodmare (dam of Geo. Washington 
2:16%, Columbus S. 2:17), by Ethan Allen Jr. 2993. General J. B. Frisbie is hand- 
some, good-gaited, black, nine years old. He is a full brother to Tom Smith 2:13%. 
FEE: $25 for the Season. 1'sual return privilege or money refunded. 



Demonio 28016 



Race Record 2:111 



IjF.MOMO 2:11'4 is the sire of Mona Wilkes 2:03%, Memonio 2:09%, 
Wilkes 2:09%, Miss Winn 2:12%, Normono (2) 2:14%, and grandsire 
Boy 2:07%. He is one of the best sons of that great sire Charles Di 




. Demonio 
- of Solano 
Charles Derby 2:20, 
ro- 
tha 
and 5 
dam 



FEE FOR THE SEASON B40. For a limited number of approved outside mares. 
Usual return privilege. Excellent pasturage at $3 per month. Good care 
taken of mares, but no responsibility assumed. For further information address 

RUSH A HAILE, Sulaun, Cal. 

Bodaker 49130 

Son of Antrim, sire of Anzella 2:06%. 

Dam Birdie by Jay Bird, sire of 8 and the dams of 4 in 2:10. 

BODAKER is one of the purest-gaited trotters living and trotted the Pleas- 
anton track last spring in 2:08%, the fastest mile ever trotted on that famous 
training track. He will make the season of 1910 at Pleasanton. Fee $50 for the 
season, with usual return privilege. Pasturage $4 per month. Address 

THOS. ROMAN, Owner, 

Pleasanton, Cal. 



Agents and Correspondents wanted everywhere for the 



Breeder and Sportsman 



Is Marriage a Failure? 

Not for those who own Miller Carts, for they are "Married " to them and don't want to be Divorced. 
This Speaks Volumes, and New Comers in The Trotting Horse Game should profit by it and 




This is our No. 7 cart. 



BUY MILLER CARTS. 

They are not perhaps the cheapest, but are Cheapest in the End. They will Out-Wear any 
other and they have A Style to them — a Satisfaction to the user, adding to the looks of a horse. 

Oh! The Riding Qualities— the Strength and the Finish of the "Miller"! Just Try One and You'll 
Never Regret It. 

Catalog shows styles and prices. 

Don't Forget, our Sulky at $90 up to Feb. 15th. 

Miller Cart Co., Goshen, N. Y. 



Insure Your Live Stock 



INDIANA AND OHIO 




INSURES 

Horses.Mules & Cattle 

AGAINST DEATH FROM 
ANY CAUS E 



ESTABLISHED 1886 



State AgentS' w *JCiPJt?VBIlDpil^a»0 Sanaome St., San Francisco. 



ED VAN CAMP, Germain Bldg., Los Angalaa. 



LARGEST and OLDEST 
STOCK COMPANY 



Paid up Capital $200,000 
Assets $450,000. 

No Assessments. 



Responsible parties with 
good business desiring 
agencies apply to State 
Agents. 



HEALD'S 
BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

trains 
for 
Busineaa 
and placaa 
ita graduates 
in positions. 



Call or write 
425 MoALLISTER ST. 

San Francisco. 



WM. F. EGAN, M.R.C.V.S. 

Veterinary Surgeon. 
1155 Golden Gate Av. 

liranch Hospital, corner Webster una chestnut 
Streets. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1910. 



a moment's tracing of the table will 
give him nine other items of life and 
death importance (financially) about 
that cow, and some of these would 
require many entries and much figur- 
ing if the dairyman had to find them 
himself. 

If a cow gives 4,000 pounds of milk 
and 160 pounds of butterfat she would 
be worth $40 at first freshening and 
$27 for beef at the end of her life. 
In a year she would produce 3,400 
pounds of skimmilk, worth $6.80; her 
calf would be worth $3.50, and the 
manure made $14.50; total value of 
these three items, $24.80. Cost ot 
labor in caring for cow one year, $18; 
interest, taxes, insurance and repairs 
on barn, $4; service fee, $2; interest, 
depreciation on cow, $3.89. veterinary 
service, medicine and spraying ma- 
terials, 40 cents; depreciation on dairy 
utensils, 70 cents; total expense, 
$28.88. It is seen that the skimmilk, 
calf and manure lack $4.19 of paying 
this expense. The value of the butter- 
fat is $43.20; cost of feed, $38. While 
there is $5.20 profit in the butterfat, 
the total income lacks $1.01 of paying 
her expenses. 

The cow giving 6,000 pounds of milk 
and 240 pounds of butter fat at the 
first freshening would be worth $50, 
and at the end of her life $25 for beef, 
a depreciation of $25. Skimmilk, 
5.100 pounds, worth $10.20; calf, $4.50; 
manure, $15.50; total, $30.20 and lack- 
ing $2.34 of equaling the total of the 
six items of expense. But the butter- 
fat would bring $64.80, while the feed 
would cost $42. Combining the loss of 
$2.34 in skimmilk and the profit of 
$22.80 on butterfat, the year's profit 
would be $20.46. 

Traced through these items in the 
same way, the cow of 8,000 pounds of 
milk and 320 pounds of butterfat 
would have a deficit of $1.16 in the 
skimmilk account and a profit of 
$40.40 in the butterfat account, the 
two combined making a total profit of 
$39.24. And the cow giving 10,000 
pounds of milk and 400 pounds of but- 
terfat would have a profit of $6.53 in 
the skimmilk and a profit of $58 in 
the butterfat; total profit, $64.53. 

This table has these items of cost, 



incomes and profit figured out for 
cows of 56 productions, or for every 
increase of 250 pounds of milk, from 
the cow that gives only 2,000 pounds 
of milk and is kept at a loss of $17.80 
tn tin- cow that gives 14,000 pounds of 
milk and returns a profit of $127.98. 

Each cow's production for a year is 
found by weighing and testing the 
milk for a week at a time at intervals 
of a few weeks, as many Illinois 
dairymen are beginning to do. The 
circular fully explains the use of the 
table, and the methods of arriving at 
all these figures, and last, but not 
least, the table is applied to each cow 
in five Illinois herds in a most inter- 
esting manner, and it is shown how 
any dairyman should apply it to his 
own herd. — Illinois Farmers' Insti- 
tute, Springfield, 111. 



SITl \TI<>\ WANTED. 

Experienced man with stallions; had 
veai's of experience wil. all classes of 
a. .1. JOHNSON, 
I'*iiier> villr Hare Track, Oakland. 



COACH STALLION FOB SALES. 

Registered, imported French coach 
stallion; handsome, stylish, sound, of 
good disposition; 17 hands high; weight 
about 1400 pounds; beautiful bright 
bay, color running back 10 generations 
on both sides without a break; sure, 
splendii sire; colts of fine form, color, 
style and action. For particulars and 
price, address L. S. Cl'LLEN, 

Gilroy, Cal. 



Horse Breeders 




MARE IMPREGNA TORS 



We GUARANTEE you can get from 2 to 6 mares in 
foal from one service of stallion or jack. Increase the 
profits from your breeding stables by using these Im- 
pregnators. No experience necessary to use them 
successfully. Prices, $3.00 to $-~>.0u euch prepaid. 

Popular SAFETY IMPREGNATING OUTFIT, especially 
recommended for impregnating so-called barren and 
irregular breeding marcs. $7.50 prepaid. 

Write for CATALOGUE which illustrates and de- 
scribes our Impregnating Devices, Breeding Hobbles, 
Stallion Bridles, Shields, Suppo*-" Jt Ser vice books. Etc. 

CRITTENDEN & CO., 0ep\,9, Cleveland. Ohio. 



IncreaseYour Profits 




ZolOCk 2:05 



Reg. No. 
34471. 



Terms: 
$50. 



McKinnsy's Fastest Entire Son 



SlKE OF 

Sherlock Holmes2:06 K. Ambush - 2:0«K 

Delilah 2:06% Velox - - 2:09*4 

Bystander 2:07% lioton de Oro 2:10% 

Josephine 2:07% Mc O. D. 2:11% 

etc., etc. 

By McKinney 2:11%, dam. the great brood 
mare. Gazelle 2:11%. 

Will make a short season, Dec. 1st to April 1st, at 

SAN JOSE DRIVING PARK, SAN JOSE, GAL. 

Monterey Road. 
Address, N. S. YOUNG, San Jose 



Fnr niQTEhVIPER Pink Eye - E P'*°°t'e. shipping 

TUI UIO ■ CI»II~tirt Fever and Catarrhal Fever. 

Sure cure and positive preventive, no matter how 
horses at any age are infected or "exposed." Liquid 
given on the tongue; acts on the Blood and Glands, ex- 
pels the poisonous germs from the body. Cures Distem- 
per in Dogs and Sheep and Cholera in Poultry. Largest 
selling live stock remedy. Cures La Grippe among human 
beings and is a fine Kidney remedy. 50c. and $1 a bottle; 
$5 and $10 a dozen. Cut this out. Keep it. Show to your 
druggist, who will get it for you. Free Booklet, "Distem- 
per, Causes arid Cures." 

SPOHN MEDICAL CO., Chemists nnd Uuctrriologlsts, 
Goshen. I mi.. I . S. A. 





Awarded Gold Medal at California State Fair, 1892. Every horse owner 
who values his stock should constantly have a supply of it on hand. It improves 
and keeps stock in the pink of condition. Ask your grocers or dealers for it. 
Positively cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. Manhattan Food Co., C. P. 
Kertel. Pres., 1001-1003 E. 14th St., Oakland. Cal. 



Pedigrees Tabulated 



AT THIS OFFICE, 



BEST GREEN TROTTER IN THE 
STATE FOR SALE. 

Bl'STER — fills the bill in every re- 
spect. Sired by Neernut 2:12%; dam by 
Nelson 2:09 l 4. For price and particu- 
lars, address G. W. PARSONS, 

Highland, Cal. 

HIGH-CLASS TROTTERS 

FOR SALE 

Geo. T. Beckers of Los Angeles offers all his 
broodmares and young Zombros for 

sale as he will go East this spring to again 
place Zombro in the stud, and if they are 
not sold before he leaves he will sell them 
over there. He has some royally bred ones. 
Write him for pedigrees and prices. 
Address 
CEO. T. BECKERS, 

3727 South Figueroa St.. Los Angeles. 

NAPA PRINCE FOR SALE. 

On account of continued illness which 
confines me to my bed, I offer my stal- 
lion, Napa Prince, for sale. He is a 
very handsome horse, with as much 
style and finish as any stallion, and is 
a sire of fine carriage and road horses. 
He is trotting bred, being by the regis- 
tered stallion Grandissimo 2:23%, and 
out of a mare by Whippleton 1883, one 
of the best sires of carriage horses 
ever in California. Will be sold at a 
bargain. Horse can be seen at my 
place, corner of Fourteenth and Ade- 
line streets, Oakland. 

F. ROCHFORD. 

FOR SALE OR LEASE, 

KIXXEY H., three-year-old stallion 
by Kinney Rose 2:13%, a son of Mc- 
Kinney 2:11 !4; dam Leta H. by Nut- 
wood Wilkes; 2nd dam Liska 
2.28% (dam of Lisonjero 2:08% 
and 4 more in the list, by Elec- 
tioneer). Kinney H. is a splendid 
young horse in every respect, hand- 
some, intelligent, good disposition and 
very promising. With his breeding and 
individuality, he is one of the most 
desirable grandsons of McKinney in 
this part of the State. 

For further particulars, call or ad- 
dress CHRIS HASHAGEN, 

2N01 21st St., San Francisco. 

CHESTNUT TOM 43488 FOR SALE. 

I want to sell my stallion Chestnut 
Tom 2:15, as I am now engaged in busi- 
ness and cannot give him my attention. 
He is by Nutwood Wilkes 2:1GH. sire of 
John A. McKerron 2:04%, the fastest 
trotting stallion in America, and of 
Copa de Oro 2:0114, the fastest pacing 
heat winner of 1909. His dam, Zeta 
Carter, la by Director 2:17, and his 
grandam Lida W. 2 : 1 8 '4 is by Nut- 
wood 2:18%, and is the dam of four in 
the list. Chestnut Tom is the sire of 
Louise Carter, three-year-old record 
2:24, the only one of his get ever 
trained. Chestnut Tom was foaled in 
1898, is a very strong and vigorous 
horse, and will be a sure sire of speed 
if given an opportunity. 

For price and further particulars, ad- 
dress GEO. T. ALGEO, 
3804 Piedmont Avenue, Onkland, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

Chestnut gelding, foaled 1905. by 
Monterey 2:09%, dam Theresa 2:14 by 
Silver Bow, second dam Laura Wilkes 
2:17 by Guy Wilkes 2:15M>, third dam 
by Steinway 2:25. Stands 15.2% hands 
high and weighs 1100 pounds. Power- 
fully built, always in good flesh, a nat- 
ural born pacer, perfectly gaited, wears 
light shoes, no straps or boots of any 
kind, and with only 7 months' training 
in all, on the 24th day of last August 
paced a mile in 2:08 flat, last half in 
1:02, last quarter in 29 seconds. The 
performances of this horse have been 
kept under cover and nobody knows his 
speed. If he is not a two-minute 
pacer, there never was one, and my 
only reason for selling is that I need 
the money. This horse is guaranteed 
sound, good-headed and game. 

Also, a beautiful blooded bay car- 
riage gelding, 5 years old, 16 hands 
high, weighs 1150 pounds, standard 
bred. Can trot a 2:30 gait. Handsome, 
guaranteed sound and safe for a lady 
to drive among cars and automobiles. 

Apply to or address H. HANSEN, 
1420 46th Ave., Melrose, Cal. 

FOR SALE 

Nearest 2:22* 

Sire of 

Highfly 2:04' 4 , Alone 2:08% 
Trueheart 2:19\>, Joe Gans 2:19 , 
Just It (3-year-old) 2:19% 

and brother to John A. McKerron second 
fastest stallion in the world. 

Nearest is 15% hands high, weight 1200 pounds. 
This horse is a sure foal getter and is in splendid 
condition. 

Address. MRS. S. V. BARSTOW. 

1042 Alameda Ave.. San Jose. Cal. 

RUBEROID ROOFING. 

Weather Proof. Acid Proof, Fire Resisting. 
BONESTELL & CO. 
118 to 114 Tint St., San Francisco. Cal. 



Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the best of profes- 
sional services to all cases of veterinary 
dentistry. Complicated cases treated suc- 
cessfully. Calls from out of town promptly 
responded to. 

The best work at reasonaoie prices 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL. 

620 Octavia St., between Fulton and Grove. 
Phone Special 2074. San Franoiaeo, Cal. 



GLIDE BROTHERS 

Successors to J. H. Glide i Sons. 
Sole Proprietors of the 
FAMOUS BLACOW ROBERTS-GLIDE 
FRENCH MERINO SHEEP. 

Glide Grade — 7-8 French and 1-8 Spanish Merino 
—Thoroughbred Shropshire Rams- 
Rams for sale at all times. 
P. O. Box 215. Telephone and telegraph. 
Dixon, Cal. Address. Dixon. Cal. 



PEDIGREED FOX HOUNDS. 

All guaranteed, broke dogs and puds. 400 red 
fox cubs. Price list. 

J. I). STODGHILL. Shelorvllle Ky. 



GOOD FISHING 

and pleasure boating on the Mann snore at 
Tiburon and vicinity. Fishing Tackle to let and 
Bait always on hand. First-class boats at reas- 
onable prices. 

San Francisco Boat House, 

Capt. F. Wm. Ehbke. Prop.. Tiburon. Cal. 
Good ferry service from foot of Marxet St.. 



Blake, Moffit & Towne 

Dealers in PAPER 

1400-1450 4th St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Blake, Mofflt oV Towne. Los Angelas. 
Blake. McFall & Co.. Portland. Ore. 

CALIFORNIA 

PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY, 

High-Class Art in 
HALFTONES AND LINE ENGRAVING 
Artistic Designing 
141 Valencia St., San Francisco 



THE 20™ CENTURY 

GUN OIL 

oil you can 
buy. Cleans out the barrels. Espe- 
cially good when smokeless powder 
U used. Oils the mechanisms, 
polishes the stock, and positively 
prevents rust on the metal in any 
climate and any kind of weather. 
Use before and after shooting. 

Three In On« Oil C«i 
102 New St. New York 



SEND 
FOR 



Our New 
AT A LOG 

Beautifully Illustrated - FREE 



C. C. MORSE & CO. 

Seeds - Plants - Trees 
57 Jackson St. San Francisco 



will reduce inflamed, swollen Joinli, 
Bruises, Soil Bunchei. Cure Boils, Fi» 
lula or any unhealthy sore quickly: 
pleasant to use; does not blister 
under bandage or remove the hair, 
and you can work the horse. *2 per 
bottle at dealers or delivered. 
Horse Book 7 D free. 

ABSORBINE, JR .for mankind, 
$1.00 per bottle. Reduces Varicose 
Veins, Varicocele, Hydrocele. 
,^E£)Qoltre, Wens, Strains, Bruises. 
— "1 ' stops Pain and Inflammation 
W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 54 Temple St., Springfield, Mass. 

For Sale by— Langley &, Michaels, Ban Fran- 
cisco, Cal.: Woodward, Clark & Co., Portland, 
Ore.; F. W. Brann Co., Los Angeles, Cal.; 
Western Whosesale Drug Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal. ; Kirk, deary & Co., Sacramento, Cal. ; 
Pacific Drug Co., Seattle, Wash.; Spokane 
Drug Co., Spokane, Wash. 




Saturday, January 29, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



California Breeders Association 

Canfield - Clark Stakes No, 1 

To be raced under the auspices of the California Breeders Association 
for foals of 1908 to be raced as 2-year-olds in 1910. 

Entries to close February 1, *10. 

$ 1 000 Guaranteed Purse for Trotters 

ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS. 

Feb. 1, '10, $10; June 1, '10, $15; final payment, $25, ten days before the 
meeting begins at which the race is to be trotted. Nothing additional from 
money winners. 



COXDITIONS. 



Mile heats, 2 in 3. Distance, 150 yards. Entry must be accompanied by 
entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment 
forfeits all previous payments. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these stakes in case the number of 
entries received is not satisfactory. 

Money divided 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. 

Write for entry blanks and further information to 



C. A. CAXFIELD, President. 



WM. I • JAMES, Secretary, 
317 West 17th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



ZOMBRO 2:11, 



The Great Sire of Trotters, 



Will be in the stud at 



Los Angeles until April 1, 1910 

TERMS: $100 to insure. Money refunded if mare proves not in foal. 

ZOMBRO has 14 new standard performers for 1909, 12 new ones in 2:20, 7 in 
2:15 and 2 in 2:10. Ten of his get reduced their records in 1909. He now has 59 
standard performers, of which 39 have records of 2:20 or better, 22 have records 
of 2:15 or better, and 9 have records of 2:10 or better. No other horse living ever 
made such a showing except Zombro's sire, McKinney. Get a Zombro while you 
have the opportunity. Address GEO. T. BECKERS, 

3727 South Figueroa St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



As they 
sometimes are 




There are no haneful and vicious fea- 
tures attending the use of "Save-the- 
Horse." 

With it you have a definite and abso- 
lutely permanent recovery and one 
which shall stand the scrutiny of the 
infallible eye of the veterinarian or ex- 
pert and all endurance tests. 

You obtain results without delays, 
relapses, blistering, fevered, swollen 
and permanently thickened tissue or 
suspended use of the horse. 




Grattan Stock Farm 
home of grattan 

Prairie View. ti_u. 



PUAIRIE VIEW, 111., November 1, 1909. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton. N. Y.: 

Gentlemen: I wish to get advice in regard to a lame horse owned by a 
friend of mine who has been looking to me for information. I am superintendent 
of the above-named farm and have in the last two years used a number of bottles 
of your remedy. It has proven satisfactory in every instance, and I believe it has 
no ejiual on the market. I am quite a little interested in helping this party and 
any information you can give me regarding the possibility of a cure will be appre- 
ciated. The horse, etc. Most truly, W. WINTERSTEIN. 

JEFFERSON, Okla., Nov. 1G, 1909. 
Troy Chemical Co., Binghamton, N. T.! 

Dear Sirs: I have a mare with bog 
spavin on botli hind legs. I have used 
"Save-the-Horse" on bone spavins and 
growths on bone. I wish you would let 
me know if it will cure a bog spavin. 
I had this old trotter, Capt. Brocket 
2:13; he was stove in the front ankle, 
there was a leakage of the joint the 
same as a bone spavin. His joints 
were enlarged big enough for two 
joints. I fired him and got no results. 
I then used "Rave-the-Horse' and he 
is now sound. If your "Save-the-Horse" 
will act the same on bog spavin, let me 
know. Our druggist has it on hand, 
and I will try a bottle. Yours respect- 
fully, J. S. STREETS. 

"Save-the-Horse" permanently cures 
bone and bog spavin, ringbone (except 
low ringbone), curb, thoroughpin. splint, 
•hoe boil, windpuff, inlured tendons, 
and all lameness, without scar or loss 
of hair. Horse may work as usual. 
Send for copy and booklet. 
SH5.00 per bottle, with a written guaran- 
tee as binding to protect you as the 
best legal talent could make It. 
At Ilrugeists and Dealers or Express 
Paid. 

TROV CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
IlliiKhamton, \. Y. 
D. E. Newell, 
fid llnyo Vista Avenue, Oakland, Cal. 
1108 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



California Breeders Association 

Canfield - Clark Stakes No. 2 

To be raced under the auspices of the California Breeders Association 
for foals of 1909 to be raced as 2-year-olds in 1911. 

Entries to close February 1, '10. 

$ 1 000 Guaranteed Purse for Trotters 



ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS. 



Feb. 1, '10, $5; Nov. 1, '10, $10; April 1, '11, $10; final payment, $25, 

ten days before the meeting begins at which the race is to be trotted. Noth- 
ing additional from money winners. 



CONDITIONS. 



Mile heats, 2 in 3. Distance, 150 yards. Entry must be accompanied by 
entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make any payment 
forfeits all previous payments. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen this stake in case the number of 
entries received is not satisfactory. 

Money divided 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. 

Write for entry blank and further information to 



C. A. CANFIELD, President. 



WM. I/. JAMES, Secretary, 
317 West 17th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



PALITE 45062 



A Sire of Early Speed. 



Sirf ViltlVlmri Willi-PC ?'lnl sire of f'opa de Oro 2:01%, John A. McKerron '2:04%. 
OlIC, numuuu HlirvCS dams of San Francisco 2 :07%, Mona Wilkes 2 :03%. etc. 



etc.. and 



Djm Palita ( 1 \ ?'ln dam of 2 in list: second dam Elsie, dam of 5; third dam Elaine 2:20, 
l/ain, I aula \i ) 4.IU, ,l am of 4; fourth dam Green Mountain Maid, dam of 9. 

PALITE is the sire of the 2-year-old stake winner Pal 2:17%, and of the 3-year-old filly Com- 
plete, second to the Occident Stake winner El Volante in 2 :13J4, and timed separately in 2:\i%. Pa- 
lite is one of the best bred stallions of the Wilkes-Electioneer cross living. His colts are all trotters 
good gaited and determined. 

He will make the season of 1910 at the ranch of the undersigned at 

DIXON, CAL. Terms: $40 for the Season at my 

Good pasturage at $2.50 per month and best of care taken of mares, but no responsibility as- 
sumed for accidents or escapes. 

For further particulars address 

E. D. DUDLEY, (Owner). Dixon, Cal. 

g!0 Due on Two-Year-Olds 

Tuesday, Feb. 1, '10. 

$7,250— Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 8 

PACIFIC COAST TROTTING HORSE BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 

Foals Born 1908 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 
ENTRIES CLOSED DECEMBER 2, 1907. 

$4,250 for Trotting Foals. $1750 for Pacing Foals. $800 to Nominators 
of Dams of Winners and $450 to Owners of Stallions. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



$3000 for Three-Yenr-Old Trotters. 
200 for Nominator on whose entry Is 

named the Dam of Winner of 

Three- Year-Old Trot. 
1250 for Two-Yenr-Old Trotters. 
200 for Nominator on whose entry Is 

named the Dam of Winner of 

Two-Yenr-Old Trot. 
100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of 

Winner of Three- Year-Old Trot 

when marc was bred. 



$1000 for Three-Year-Old Pacers. 

200 for Nominator on whose entry Is 

named the Dam of Winner of 

Three- Year-Old Pace. 
750 for Two-Year-OId Pacers. 
200 for Nominator on whose entry Is 

named the Dam of Winner of 

Tno-Venr-Olil Pace. 
100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of 

Winner of Three-Yenr-Old Pace 

when mare was bred. 



$250 in Special Prizes was Paid to Stallion Owners. 

$10 on Two-Year-Olds February I, 1910; $10 on Three- Year-Olds February I, 1911. 

STARTING PAYMENTS — $25 to start in the Two-Year-OId Pace; 935 to start In 
the Two-Year-OId Trot; $35 to start In the Three- Year-Old Pace; 950 to 
start in the Three-Year-Old Trot. All Starting Payments to be made ten days 
before the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 

Nominators must designate when making payments to start whether the horse 
entered is a Trotter or Pacer. 

Colts that start at two years old are not barred from starting again in the three- 
year-old divisions. 

Be Sure to Make This Payment. 



E. P. HEALD, I ks. 



F. W. KELLEY, Sec'y, 

:!i>ii Pacific Bldg.,San Francisco 



Jim Logan 



Reg. No. 44997. 




J. E. MONTGOMERY, 



Champion 3-year-old Pacer of the World. 
Record 2:05' , in third heat. 

Sired by Chas, Derby 1907 (sire of 9 in 2:10 list; sons siren Sir 
Alberts. 2:0834. Sir lolm S. 2:0154 Mona Wilkes 2:0»K. a tC„ etc.); 
dam Kllie Logan <dam of Sir Albert S. 2M.\\4. Jim Logan (:>) 
2:06%. I>an Logan (Mat.) 2:12%) by Dnrfeo U2M (sire of Shecan 
2:12&Si etc.); second dum Hippie by Prompter: third dam (irace 
by Hneciinoer. 

Jim Logan stands Hi lianas 1 inch. He is sound and a splen- 
did Individual. Good disposition and unexcelled breeding. 

Season of 1910 at 

PLEAS ANTON, Cal. 

(Limited number of mares.) 

FEE: $50 for the Season 

$10 returned if mare fails to get in foal. Money due when mare is 
served. Hood pasturage nt $> per month. Most of care taken of 
mares, but no responsibility assumed. 

Ship mares via Southern Pacific or Western Pacific. 

- Plaasanton, Cal. 



Take the Breeder and Sportsman. 



•4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1910. 



\ A Whirlwind Finish! 

Mr. Woolfolk Henderson, of Lexington, Ky., who lias made an unprecedented record during the year 1909, shot at Houston, Texas, 
/ December 20-2L', with tlie following results: 

/ High Amateur Average, . 800 x 825. Longest Run, Unfinished, . 252 Straight. High Gun, Last Day, . 274 x 275 * 



At this shoot Mr. Henderson used the same load in 



PETERS SHELLS 

that he lias shot throughout the year. His scores are an eloquent witness to the shooting efficiency of these goods. See a little later 

advertisement for full particulars. 



THE PETERS CARTRIDGE COMPANY, CINCINNATI, 0. ^SirJSSlfVS fi£ t 

Every Horse Should Be Clipped in Season 

It is the wise tiling to do for the clipped horse not only is easier to clean and looks better, but clipping does much to make him 
immune from coughs, coles and the usual ills that come to a horse from standing in a coat of long, wet hair after any hard 

exertion. The prespiration evaporates quickly from the clipped animal and leaves him dry. On 
cold days a blanket when he stands keeps him comfortable. 

The Best Clipping Machine the World has ever Seen is the 

Stewart Ball Bearing Enclosed Gear Machine 

It is the easiest turning, fastest clipping and most enduring of all machines. The materials in it are 
all of better quality, the workmanship is superior. All file hard cut steel gears, protected from dust 
and dirt and running constantly in oil. It couldn't be better for twice the money. 

Write for the New Catalog Send Now 



m CHICAGO FLEXIBLE SHAFT COMPANY, 204 Ontario Street, CHIGAGO 





$5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



—THE. 



State Fair Futurity Stakes No. 2 

Foals of Mares Covered in 1909 to Trot and Pace at Two and Three Years Old. 

$2850 for Trotting Foals. $2150 for Pacing Foals. 



$5,000 



GUARANTEED. 



TO BE GIVEN BY THE 



CALIFORNIA STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, Sacramento, Cal. 

Entries to close February 1, '10. 



MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Trot when 

mare was bred. 

FOR TWO-YEAR-OLDS to take place at the California State Fair, 1912 

Two-Year-Old Trotters, • • • $600 
Two-Year Old Pacers, ... 400 



$100 to Owner of Stallion, sire of Winner of Three-Year-Old Pace when 

mare was bred. 

FOR THREE-YEAR-OLDS to take place at the California State Fair, 1913 

Three-Year-Old Trotters, • • • $1400 
Three-Year-Old Pacers, • ■ • $1100 



Consolations for Horses That Started in Above and Won No Money. 

ENTRANCE FREE— Otherwise same conditions to govern as in the main events. 

TWO-YEAR-OLD TROTTERS, 9350) TWO-YEAR-OLD PACERS, $250. THREE- YEAR-OLD TltOTTKIts, $400; THREE- YEAR-OLD PACERS, *:«■<>. 

KXTRWCH AM) PAYMENTS — $2 tn nominate mare on February 1, 1910. when name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 July 1, 1910; 

$5 December 1, 1910; $10 on yearlings February 1, 1911; $10 on two-year-olds February 1, 1912; $10 on three year olds February 1, 1913. 

STARTING PAYMENTS — $15 to start in the two-year-old pace, $25 to start in the two-vear-old trot; $35 to start in the three-year-old pare-; $50 to start in the 
the three-year-old trot. All starting payments to be made ten days before the first day of the State Fair, at which the race is to take place. 

No additions!! entrance will be charged In the ( (insolation Stakes. 

Nominators must designate when making payments to start whether the horse entered la n Trotter or Paeer. 
Colts that start nt two years old are not barred from starting again in the three-year-old divisions. 

CONDITIONS. 

The races for two-year-olds will be mile heats, two in three, and for three-year-olds, three in five. Distance for two-vear-olds, 150 yards; for three-year-olds, 
100 yards. 

If a Blare proves barren or slips or has a dead foal or twins, or if either the mare or foal dies before February I, 1911, her nominator may sell or transfer his 
nomination or substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership; but there will he no return of a payment, nor will any entry he liable for more than nmount 
paid In or contracted for. In entries, the name, color and pedigree of mnre must he given J also the name of tbe horse lo which sic was bred In 1909. 

Entries must be accompanied by the entrance fee. 

Nominators liable only for amounts paid in. Failure to make anv payment forfeits all previous payments. This Association is liable for $5000, the amount of 
the guarantee, only. Hopples will be barred in trotting and pacing divisions. 

Right reserved to declare off or reopen these Stakes in case the number of entries received is not satisfactorv to the Board of Directors 
Races for Two-Year-Old Stake and Consolation end with the conclusion of the third heat. 
Races for Three-Year-Old Stake and Consolation end with the conclusion of fifth heat. 

Money divided in each division of the Stake 50, 25, 15 and 10 per cent. There will be no more moneys in each division than there are starters. 

All contestants not winning a heat in three or awarded second position twice will be retired from the race, but do not forfeit their winnings as shown bv the 
summary. 

Entries open to the world. 

AVrlte for Entry Blanks to 

H. A. JASTRO, President. 

Other than exceptions made in this entry blank rules of National Trotting Association to govern. 



J. A. FILCHER, Sec'y, Sacramento, Cal 



Saturday, January 29, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



lft 



GOLCHER BROS. 

(Formerly of Clabrough.Golcher & Co.) 




Fin* Fishing Tackle, Guns, Sporting and Outing Goods 
Phon. Temporary 1883. 5 |Q Market St Saf| FraHCISCO 



MANUFACTURERS 
^OUTFITTERS, 

FOR THE I 

SPORTSMAN 
CAMPERS 
ATHLETE. 



1-8-53 GEARY ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EQUIPMENT 
«? APPARATUS 

FOR 

EV ERY NE ED. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 
SUPPLIES. 



PHIL. B. BEKEART CO., 

SOLE PACIFIC COAST BRANCH 



For various manufacturers of Fire Arms, Sporting Goods, 
and Fishing Tackle. 

No Stock Carried. 
Goods Sold to the Trade Only. 



San Francisco, Gal. 



No road too rough. Oarrlei 
weight over the wheels, not 
on the axle. It has the 
strength. Never a tired driv- 
er after a long workout day. 
Why? The longspring makes 
it easy riding.and doesaway 
with all horse motion. Furn- 
ished with either Pneumatic 
or cushion tires . 



McMurray 

Sulkies and 
Jogging Carts 

Standard the world over. 

Address for printed matter and prices. 



Sales agent for 
California. 



W. J. KENNEY, 
531 Valencia St., San Francisco 



75 PER CENT 



OF ALL HORSE OWNERS 

AND TRAINERS 



USE AND RECOMMEND 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE FOOT REMEDY 



—SOLD BY— 




Sol. DeutHch San Frniicisco, Cal. 

Pierce Cotter Co L.os Angeles, Cal. 

R. Grant Potter Sacramento, Cal. 

Miller * Pntternon San Diego, Cnl. 

J. G. Read & Bro.. Ogden, Utah 

E. H. Irish Butte, Mont. 

A. A. Kraft Co Spokane, Wash. 

Thosj. M. Henderson Seattle, Wash. 

C. Rodder Stockton, Cal. 

VVm. E. Deteln Pleaaanton, Cnl. 

V. Koch . San Joae, Cal. 

Keystone Bros San Francisco, Cal. 

Fred Reedy Fresno, Cal. 

Jno. McKerron San Francisco, Cal. 

Jos. McTlgue San Francisco, Cal. 

Brydon Bros l.os Angeles, Cal. 



Guaranteed uuder the Food and Drugs 
Act, June 30, 1UOR. Serial Number 1219. 



JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Manufacturers, 418 W. Madison Street, Chicago. 

The First National Bank 

Corner Post and Montgomery Streets 

Complete Banking 
Service 

I. The First National Bank fully equipped for commercial business. 

II. First Federal Trust Company, associated with the First National Bank, 
pays interest on deposits, and takes entire charge of property, real and personal. 

III. Armor Plate Safe Deposit Vaults, the highest type of security, guarantee 
absolute protection for valuables. 

Inspection Invited 

Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportaman. 



"Scores That Count" 



THE OFFICIAL RECORDS 

of the Inter-State Association of all Single Targets Shot at in Regis- 
tered Tournaments during 1909 show that 

The High Amateur Averages 



were won by the following gentlemen: 










Shot at 


Broke 


Per cent 


First — Jesse Young, Chicago, III. 


4498 


4730 


95.09 


Second — W. H. Clay, St. Louis, Mo. 


2128 


2240 


95.00 


Third — Peter Baggerman, St. Louis, Mo. 


1908 


2010 


94.92 


Fourth — Woolfolk Henderson, Lexington, Ky. 


9008 


9495 


94.87 


Fifth— Homer D. Clark, Upper Alton, III. 


0061 


6390 


94.85 


Sixth — J. K. Graham, Ingleside, III. 


4788 


5005 


94.53 



Amateurs Shoot the Powders They Prefer 
and the Above Amateurs All Shot One of the 



i 



SU PONT 



SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDERS 

\ The "Regular and Reliable" Brands. 




AN UNPARALLELED RECORD IN SHOOTING HISTORY MADE BY THE PARKER GUN. 

At Chicago, the week beginning June 21, Mr. Frank Fisher won the I'reliminary Handicap from 
the 18 yard mark, shooting at ten doubles and eighty singles— score. 94. 

Mr. Fred Shattuck won the Grand American Handicap from the 18 yard mark— score. 9fi, and L'O 
straight in the shoot-off. 

Mr. Fred Gilbert again won the Professional Championship with a score of 19:1 out of 200, which 
Included 40 doubles, of which he broke :i7. making his second consecutive winning of this classic 
event, and the fourth consecutive winning for the PA KK KK (i CN . 

TIIK PARKER GUN also won the High General Average for the entire tournament, thus winning 
about all there was in sight. 

PARKER BROS., MERIDEN, CONN. (Oldest Gun Builder, in America.. 
New York Salesrooms, 32 Warren St. 



QUNnsJE 



Take It In 

If you have the remedy on hand, and are ready to 
act promptly, you will find that, there isnothinRin 
the form of Spavins, Splints, Curbs, Windpuffs and 
Bunches 'which will not yield promptly and perma- 
nently to 

Quinn's Ointment 



Ithas saved thout-ands of pood horse* from the pcddler'j 
cartatxl the broken-down horse market. Mr.O. B. Dick. 
I ens. of Minneapolis Minn., who conducts one of the Invest livery sti.l.lcs In the .Northwest 
rttMMfollqwiOhaTe.Deeni^^ 



„. 1 Uke pleasure In recommending it lo n j n ic mis. pn Norseman 
out It In his stable. For curbs, splints, spavins, wliid|,utrs and nil bunches It tins no equal." 
'PrlceSt 00 per battle. Sold by all druggists or »ent by mull. Writo us for circulars, 

W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 




Subscribe for the Breeder and Sportsman. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 29, 1910. 



HORSE CLOTHING 
HORSE MEDICINES 
BLANKETS, ROBES and WHIPS 



The Best Horse Boots 




ORSE BOOTS 



The only 
Manufacturer 
of 

Horse Boots 

on the 
Facific Coast. 




Another Rugged Remington 
Pioneer 



Eliphalet Remington was the pioneer gun maker in America. This was in the year 181ft, His sturdy spirit lias never died. The Remington Policy is to blaze the way — / 

always to lead. The Autoloading Shotgun is another Remington Pioneer. It opens a new field because it loads itself and is Solid-Breach Ilammerless besides. Old Y 

style guns will have little charm for you if you once try this modern Remington o-shot repeater. Let us send you catalog and " What the Hunters Say." ^ 

The low price of the Autoloading Gun will surprise you. THE REMINGTON ARMS CO., I lion, N. Y. Agency: 315 Broadway, New York City £ 




The Bullet that strikes 
A B LOW O F 
2038 POUNDS 



when shut from tl 



.401 CALIBER 



WINCHESTER 

SELF-LOADING RIFLE, MODEL 1910 



This new Winchester shoots a heavier bullet and hits a harder blow than any other recoil operated 
rifle made. It is even more powerful than the .30 U. 8. Army, of big-game hunting fame. The 
loading and tiring of this rifle are controlled by the trigger finger. It 



HITS LIKE THE HAMMER OF THOR. 

■ml for illustrated circular fully describing this new rifle, which has strength and power plus. 



WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., 



New Haven, Conn. 




In the Marsh or Field 

Selby Loads 

Get the Limit Bags. 
Ask the Shooter Who KNOWS! 



SELBY SMELTING & LEAD CO., 



San Francisco, Cal 



1 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 5, 1910. 



THIRD ANNUAL 



Pleasanton Auction Sale! 

OF TROTTING STOCK 

Will Take Place 

Thursday, March 3, 1910, 



Commencing at 9:45 a. m., sharp. 

Work Horses 



FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 1910. 

The Greatest and Choicest Collection of Trotting Horses Ever Offered at Auction in California. 

100 — Representatives of the Leading Stake-Winning and Fashionable Trotting Families in America — 100 



Consignment from C. L. Crellln, Pleasanton. 

Bay mare, pedigree Hue eoiaoilshed. 
Bay gelding by Searchlight 2:03%. 
Rosie Woodburn 2:16 by Easter W.-Lady Beth by 
Goldnut. 

Bay till v by Sir John 2:14-Rosie Woodtiurn 2:16. 

Wilkes 2 : 1 5 Vi . 
Bay Ally by C. The Limit -La Moscovita by (iuy Wilkes 

2:15%. 

Consignment from J. ft. Montgomery, Pleasanton. 

Nukina. br. f. by Nushagak- K inocha by MeKinney 
2:iiy 4 . 

Hen Hush. t>. s. Demonio 2:11 % -Minerva by Uuy 
Wilkes 2 : 1 5 >4 . 

Consignment from II. Suiting, Pleasanton. 

Gcorgie I.. .'. n. !i. 1. b\ l.ecco 2 :U9 % - Mart ha Frazier 
by Rustic. 

Consignment from S. It. Van Dervoort. Irvington. 

Vaipy. cb. s. by Monterey-Silver Queen by Silver 
Bow 2:16. 

Consignment from v. Edstrt Oakland. 

Kuan Hal (tr.) 2:15% by Athablo 2:24%-Carmen by 
News Boy. 

Consignment from Henrj Strove, Wntsonvllle. 

Strathdon, b. tf. Iiv Stratbway 2:19-Elsle Downs by 

Boodle 2:12V4. 
Klection Bell, b. g. by Monbells 2:23-Manzanita by 

Electioneer. 
Bay Ally by Kinney Lou. 

Airlie 1)., b. f.. by Demonio 2:11% -Mamie Airlie by 
Prince Airlie. 

Senator H.. b. g. by Diablo 2 :09 % - Kerina by Mon- 
tana Wilkes. 

Consignment from Estate of I". P. Hellvrtg, 
Uvarado, 

Zoe Dell, b. f. by Zolock 2:05% -Lively Dell by Prince 
Lovelace. 

Kloise Dell. b. f. by Alconda .Jay-Lovely Dell by 

Prince Lovelace. 
Bay colt by Alconda Jay-Lovely Dell by Prince 

Lovelace. 

Lively Dell. b. m. by Prince Lovelace- Alto Dell by 
Holmdell 5290. 

t onslgnmeni from Win. 1 1 « ndrtckson, San Jose. 

Ohio, gr. m. by I'everil-dam by White Line Jr. 
Marv Sweet, by McKena-White Swan by Grover 

Clay. , 
Alfred H.. b. g. by Clay S.-Pussie by Major Ban. 
Peggie, gr. m. by McKena-White Swan by Grover 

Clay. 

Prime Hendrick, grey colt liy McKena-White Swan 

by Grover Clay. 
Josephine, b. m. by McKena-Tchachapl. 
Gabriel, b. g. by McKena-Teliechapi. 

i onslgnment from Crank M. Gray, Los Gatos. 

Torpedo, bl. g. by Malbeur-Mamie Harney by The 
Moor. 

Consignment from C. B. Brumbaugh, Tesln. 

Dick Bowles, b. c. by Baron Bowles 2:25-Belle by 
Elector 2170. 

Consignment from \\ . Ford Thomns, San Francisco. 

Dorothy, cb. f. by Stratbway 2:19-Simona by Secre- 
tary. 

Consignment from M. < ■ Keefer, w Llnnd, Cnl. 

Annie MeKinney. b. m. by McKlnney 2 :1 1 % -Henri- 
etta by Boodle 2:12%. 

Nada, bl. m. by Nushngak-Addie W. by Whips 2:27Vfc. 

Monca. oh. C, by Monicrat 2:13%-The Bloom by 
Nushagak. 

Monicrat 2:13%, bl. s. by Woodmon 2 :2S % -Altacrat 

by Altamont. Jr. 
Zorankin, b. c by Zombro 2 : 1 1 -Dlmon tea by Diablo 

2:09%. 



Consignment from Prank J. Kllnutrlck, Ban Francisco. 

Oliver Todd, br. c. by Todd 2:11% -Olive Brady by 
Cyclone. 

Black Hall. bl. c. by Ozono (son of Mokm. dam Mag- 
gie Yeazer (dam of Walnut Hall 2:08% by Red 
Wilkes. 

Gerald Jay by Jay Bird, dam Black Annie by Bour- 
bon Wilkes. 

Moko Hall by Walmu Hall 2:08%, dam by Moko. sec- 
ond dam by Simmons 2:2S 

Governor Constantine by Constantino 2:12%, dam 
Nevada by Onward. 

Grant Constantine by Constantine 2:12%, dam Viva- 
cious 2:27 by Bernal. 
Consignment from C. II. Williams, Palo \lto. Cal. 

Leo Rex, b. g. by Searchlight Rex-Leonet K. by Leo 
Corbett. 

Miss Knott, b. f. by Knott McKinney-Miss Mascot by 

Iran Alto 2:12%. 
Alta Rex, b. g. by Searchlight Rex-Alta Nola 2:20 

by Altamont 2:26%. 
Consignment from Hush A Halle, Suisun, Cnl. 
Brown colt by Demonio 2 : 1 1 Vi - Elorita by Alban 

2:24. 

Chestnut colt by Demonio 2:11% -Nellie T. by Dawn 
2:18%. 

Bay colt by Demonio 2:11% -Hannah by Le Grande. 
Bay filly by Demonio 2:1 1 % -Rosebud by Falliii 2:23. 
Brown colt by Demonio S:ll%-Potrero Girl by 
Prince Airlie. 

Chestnut colt by Demonio 2 : 1 1 '4 -Mamie Airlie by 

Prince Airlie. 
Chestnut filly by Demonio 2:ll%-OUta by Bradtmoor 

2:26%. 

Bay mare by Demonio 2 : 1 1 '4 -Minerva by Guy Wilkes 
2:16%. 

Consignment from E. I>. Dudley* Dixon, Cal, 

Miss Valentine, b. 111. by Bayswater Wilkes-Bee Sterl- 
ing by Sterling. 

Babe D., ch. m. by I >a wn light-Bee Sterling by Sterling. 

Capalita, bay f. Palite-lma Jones by Captain MeKinney. 

Starrina, br. c. by Star Pointer 1 :59 V* -Friskarina 2:13% 
by Bayswater Wilkes. 

Balite, cb. c. by Paiite-Babe I >. by Dawnlight 21484. 

Der Teufel, bl.' g. by Diablo 2:09% -Babe D. by Dawn- 
light 21484. 

Leta. ch. f. by Palite-Babe D. by Dawnlight 214S4. 
Eorah, b. f. by Der Teufel-Zillah by Bradtmoor. 
Consignment from Harry HeFadyen, Dixon. 

Uachael, ch. f. by Der Teufel-Lady Cuba by Falrose 
2:23. 

Consignment from Estate of l>r. C. F. >l illatr, Dixon. 

Josepliine. ch. f. bv Stratbway 2:19-Maud by Diablo 
2:09%. 

Carmencita, bl. f. by Zolock 2 :05 % -Maud by Diablo 

2:09%. 

Brown gelding by Palite-Maud by Diablo 2:09%. 
Brown colt by l J alite-Maud by Diablo 2:09%. 
Maud, brown mare by Diablo 2:09>.,, by Itichards 
Elector 2170. 

Consignment from s. >. stiles. Oakland. 

Bon Cheval. b. B. by Bon Voyage 2:12% -Silver Haw 
by Silver Bow 2:16. 

Consignment from P. ll. Chase A Co. 

Starlock, b. s. by Zolock- Fanny Gossip by Gossiper. 
Delecco, b. f. bv Lecco 2:09% -Laura Dell by Boydell. 
Laura Dell, b. m bv Boydell-Maud 1'. by Challenger. 



Consignment fr \. L. Nichols, Chleo. 

Bay mare by Nutwool Wilkes, in foal to Bon Voyage 
2:12%. 

Consignment from .ins. J, Horrisey, Oaklnnd. 

Bessie, b. m. by MeKinney 2 : 1 1 % -Mountain Hare by 

Young Venture. 
Bay filly by Sir John-Bessie Woodburn 2:16 by 

Easter W. 

Consignment from t. D. Sexton, Oakland. 

Patrick S.. br. s. by Demonio 2:11 '4 -Eva by Le Grande. 
Lady Wilkes, by Nutwool Wilkes 2:16%-Lady Direct 

by Direct 2:05%. 
Sister Vesta, i ll. f. by liictatus 2:17-by Sidmore 2:19. 

Conslg ent from .1. Twohlg, Wnrm Springs. 

Bay mare by Lord Alwin-Melba by Nutwood Wilkes 

2:16%. 

Melba, b. m. by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%-Myra by Cal. 
Nutwood. 

Consignment from II. W. Wallls, Los llanos. 

Chancellor. Jr.. b. g. by Chancellor-Gazelle by Gov. 

Sprague 2:20%. 
Marv W., ch f. by Dictatus 2:17-Ethel C. by Sidney 

2:19%. 

Consignment from ll. s. Hogoboom, Woodland. 

Arthur W. 2:11% by Way land W. 2:12%-by Grand 
Moor. 

Judge Gaddis, ch. c. by Palo King-Diawaldo by Diablo 
2:09%. 

Consignment from Thos. II. Dlffebuch, Mill Valley. 

Cock Robin, b. g. by Seymour Wilkes 2:08% -by Gen. 
Benton. 

Chestnut gelding by Bonnie Direct 2 :05 % -Lurline by 
Stein way 2:25%. 

Consignment from 11. 6. Smith. 

Daken D. 2:16 . b. g. by A thadon-Sadie McGregor by 

Robert McGregor. 
Bonnie Searchlight, b. s. by Searchlight 2:03% -Rite B. 

by Boodle, Jr. 

Consignment from \\ . T. HcBrlde, I'leasnnton. 

Ch. c. bv Nutwood Wilkes 2:16%-Falo Belle by Palo 
Alto 2:08%. 

Guvliglit, b. g. bv Se irea light 2:03%-Li Muscovite by 
Guy Wilkes 2:1 .")'».. 

Consignment from Geo. \. Bamage, Pleasanton. 

Bert Arandale 2:19% by Sidney I )illun-Oakley Russell 
bv Happy Kussell 2:21%. 

Clara Oakley, b. f. by Sidney Dillon-Oakley Russell by 
Happy Russell. 

Clara Mills, b. f. by Lecco 2 :09 ■'<, -Chi ra Oakley by Sid- 
ney Dillon. 

Consignment from W. 11. Connolly, Snlsun. 

Bill b. s. bv Demonio 2 : 1 1 1 i -Sabledew by Sable Wilkes 
2:18. 

Consignment from I.. M. Lndd, Holllster. 

Monbella. b. s. by Monbells 2:23-Laura C. 2:29% by 
Electioneer. 

Consignment from ibuott A Heese, Danville, Cal. 

Chas. Derby 2:20, b. s. by Steinway 2:25% -Katy G. by 
Electioneer. 

Alsilke, ch. m. by Chas. Derby 2:20-Empress 2:30 by 
Flaxtai'l. „ , 

Oakwood. ch. g. by Chas. Derby 2 :2o- Essie l arley by 
Mountain Boy 1841. 

Consignment from Win. lyres, San Frnnclseo, 

Bay stallion by Best Policy, dam by Robert Direct. 
Consignment from Fred Hnhn, San Frnnclseo. 

l'n, ma S.. a famous sad He mare. 



Catalogues Now Ready! 

S. P. Trains Leave Ferry Building, San Francisco, at 
7:40 and 9:00 a. m. 



FRED H. CHASE & CO., 

478 Valencia Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Saturday, February 5, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPOR^MAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

(Established 1882.) 

T. W. KELLEV, Proprietor. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of th* Pacific Coast. 
OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACIFIC BUILDING, 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 

Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco Post-Office. 

Terms— One Year. $3; Six Months. $1.75; Three Months, $1. 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or registered letter 
addressed to F. W. Kelley. P. O. Drawer 447. San Francisco. Calif. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name 
and address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private 
guarantee of good faith. 



STALLIONS 1DVBRTISED. 

AEROLITE (3) 2:11%.. C. L. Gifford, Lewiston, Idaho 

BON VOYAGE (3) 2:12% Ted Hayes, San Jose 

BODAKER 49130 Thos. Ronan, Pleasanton 

DEMONIO 2:11% Rush & Haile, Suisun 

GEN. J. B. FRISBIE 41637 Rush & Haile, Suisun 

JIM LOGAN (3) 2:05% I. E. Montgomery, Pleasanton 

PALITE 45062 E. D. Dudlev, Dixon 

ZOLOCK 2:05'/ 4 N. S. Young, San Jose 

ZOMBRO 2:11 Geo. T. Beckers, Los Angeles 

o 

HARNESS RACING DATES. 

Xortli Pacific Circuit. 

Everett, Wash Aug. 30-Sept. 3 

Portland, Ore Sept. 5-10 

Salem, Oregon State Fair Sept. 12-17 

Walla Walla, Wash Sept. 19-24 

North Yakima. Wash Sept. 26-Oct. 1 

Spokane, Wash Oct. 3- 8 

Lewiston and Boise, Idaho Oct. 10-15 

Grand Circuit. 

Kalamazoo Julv 25-29 

Detroit Aug. 1- 5 

Cleveland Aug. 8-12 

Buffalo Aug. 15-19 

New York Aug. 22-26 

Ueadville Aug. 29-Sept 2 

Hartford Sept. 5- 9 

Syracuse Sept. 12-16 

Columbus . Sept. 19-30 



DISTRICT FAIRS must be revived in California. 
They should never have been permitted to lapse 
even though the State appropriations were cut off, 
but should have maintained their organizations and 
held fairs at least once in two years. Had this been 
done there would now be an organized force ready to 
ask the Legislature to renew the appropriations 
formerly made for the maintenance of the district 
fairs. At the last Legislature a bill was passed 
however, which provides for the organization of fair 
districts, the holding of annual expositions, and per- 
mitting them to draw money from the State treas- 
ury for the payment of premiums. All that is needed 
to make the law effective is an appropriation of 
money to meet these demands, the last Legislature 
not having provided any such fund. There are sev- 
eral plans being proposed at the present time for 
the restoration of fairs, one being for the estab- 
lishment of three State and five district fairs. It is 
suggested that the three State fairs be held at Sac- 
ramento, Oakland and Los Angeles, while the dis- 
trict fairs would be movable. The idea is not a 
bad one and the appropriations needed to make 
them successful would be less than the aggregate 
amount formerly appropriated for the forty-odd 
district fairs that once had State fid. The proper 
thing for the people who want the fairs re-estab- 
lished is to agree on a plan before the Legislature 
meets and then to make an united effort to have it 
made into a law. The great States of New York, 
Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota and many 
others have found that the State and district fairs 
to which aid is given are most popular with the 
people, and now that experts are employed to man- 
age them they are almost self supporting. Cali- 
fornia could not do better than to establish a cir- 
cuit of fairs. The people would patronize them and 
they would be of great benefit to farmers, fruit- 
growers, stock breeders and all others who grow 
or manufacture anything for sale. 

o 

THE THIRD ANNUAL SALE of trotting bred 
horses which Fred H. Chase & Co. have announced 
to be held at Pleasanton Training Park on Thurs- 
day, March 3d, promises to eclipse any sale ever 
had by this well known firm. The class of horses 
consigned is higher than usual, and in fact there 
are many horses catalogued that would be consid- 
ered big drawing cards at an Old Glory or a Blue 
Ribbon sales in the east. The six young stallions 
sent by Mr. Frank J. Kilpatrick are a big feature 
in themselves as they represent the best producing 
blood now so highly prized by eastern breeders — 



that of Moko, Walnut Hall, Jay Bird and Constan- 
tine. Then there are the yearlings by Demonio 
2:1114 from the Suisun Stock Farm, several young- 
sters by the young speed sire Palite sent by E. D. 
Dudley of Dixon, several very choice young trotters 
sent by W. T. McBride, Tim Sexton, H. S. Hogo- 
boom, C. H. Williams, M. C. Reefer, William Hen- 
drickson, Henry Struve, C. L. Crellin, .1. E. Mont- 
gomery and other well known breeders. Some good 
stallions have been consigned. That great speed 
sire Chas. Derby 2:20 is among them, also Arthur W. 
2:11%, Monbello, Election Bell, Monicrat 2:U 1 / 2 , 
Judge Gaddis, Bonnie Searchlight, and several other 
highly bred stallions. Geo. Ramage has consigned 
his fast trotter Bert Arondale 2:19% by Sidney Dil- 
lon, and there are any number of high class pros- 
pects to be offered during this big sale. Pleasanton 
will be full of horsemen during that week, the hotels 
there having already received many reservations for 
rooms by mail. In the advertising columns this 
week will be found a list of the horses to be sold, 
and those who want catalogues should send for 
them immediately to Fred H. Chase & Co., 478 Val- 
encia street, San Francisco. The sale will open at 
Pleasanton at 9:45 o'clock sharp, Thursday morning, 
March 3d. 

o 

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING for the harness 
horse owners and trainers to do right now is to agi- 
tate the holding of harness race meetings in their 
respective localities. If all those interested in har- 
ness horses who reside in Butte county will get to 
work in earnest there will be a good meeting at 
Chico this year, and the same is true in regard 
to every other county where there is a track fit to 
hold a meeting on. We would suggest that some 
horseman in every county in California where a 
meeting is possible, organize himself into a com- 
mittee of one and start out immediately to see what 
can be accomplished. If three or four energetic men 
get together and resolve that a harness meeting be 
held at their town, they will find it easy to finance 
the proposition and get the support of the business 
men of the community. A thousand dollars sub- 
scribed by the business men of a town will assure 
a good meeting which will be the means of bring- 
ing a crowd to the town that will leave there ten 
times that amount. Salinas. Pleasanton, Santa 
Rosa, Woodland, Chico and other places have raised 
from $1500 to $2500 in the past for a meeting and 
found it paid. They can do so again this year, 
and they should be at it now. The longer the delay 
the harder it is to fill the purses. The California 
circuit should be announced not later than March 1st. 
The North Pacific circuit is already announced and 
nearly all the racing to be held on the other side 
of the Rocky Mountains has had its dates out for 
several weeks. There is no earthly reason why Cali- 
fornia should be so far behind the rest of the 
country. 

o : 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



J. L. Whitlock, San Bernardino. — We cannot sug- 
gest any plan by which you can trace the pedigree 
of your mare. There is nothing to start on, and it 
is much better to let her go as "untraced" than to 
get a lot of "said-to-be'' information from people 
who know nothing about the facts. 

G. L. W., City.— Charivari, 2: 20*4. was bred by 
T. C. Snider, of Sacramento, and sold by him to 
the late Chas. A. Hug of this city. She was sired 
bv Sterling 6223. dam Alice by Prompter, second dam 
Madam Buckner, said to be by Gibson's Tom Hal. 
Madam Buckner was the dam of Argent 2:24V 2 and 
Acrobat 2:18%. 



H. O. Ramsey, V. S., Phoenix, Arizona. — There was 
a stallion called Rafael. He was by Fallis 2:23, dam 
Stockton Maid by Chieftain 721. He was not bred 
at Pala Alto. We can find no record of Lady Bashaw 
by Bashaw 50 ever being in California. She was at 
one time owned by Richard Richards of Racine, Wis- 
consin. She is registered in Vol. 7. 

J. H. Orcutt, Garden (hove— In 1891 Sidney's serv- 
ice fee was $250. Guy Wilkes once stood at $1000, 
Sable Wilkes at $250. Stamboul was a private stal- 
lion most of the time when he was in California, 
and we are unable to find an advertisement in which 
his fee was stated. 



Dr. W. C. Scott, Healdsburg — Ned Lock 2:24'/ 2 was 
a chestnut horse and took his record at Petaluma in 
1891 in a trotting race. He was by Antelope, dam 
Dolly, pedigree not given. So far as we can ascer- 
tain there was only one mare named Dolly bred at 
Palo Alto, and she was by Electioneer out of Lady 
Dooley by McCracken's Black Hawk. She was not 
the dam of Ned Lock. 



OUR LOS ANGELES LETTER. 

The weather was delightful here all last week, 
bright and clear though a little too cold for very fast 
work. Still that made no difference as the horses 
are not far enough forward in their training to be 
asked to step anywhere near their limit. 

Last Saturday the Out West Riding Club and the 
Los Angeles Driving Club joined hands in an enter- 
tainment at Agricultural Park with an elaborate pro- 
gram that drew a crowd of 1500 who seemed to 
thoroughly enjoy the sport. There were relay races, 
roping and "ringing" exhibitions, riding bucking 
horses by Mike Brahm and Mrs. Dell Blanchette from 
Oklohoma, a mounted quadrille of three acts, that 
was excellently executed, and a very realistic stage 
hold-up and rescue with an immense amount of pow- 
der burned and excitement generally not only in the 
audience but among the horses as well. 

The harness races were above the average, for the 
time made was good and the majority of the events 
showing close finishes. The best time of the after- 
noon was made in the 2:25 class for pacers and in 
the 2:20 class for trotters, miles being marked in 
2:18 and 2:19, which is extra good for the winter 
season. The closest finish of the day was in the 2:20 
trot, but all of the heats were interesting. 

Summary of harness races: 

Trotting, 2:25 class, two in three heats. 

Paul W. (Backer) 1 1 

Amies (Williams) 2 2 

Drummer Boy (Willis) 3 3 

Mazcappa (McLellan) 4 4 

Time— 2:24%, 2:22%. 

Leonora M. scratched. Jules Jacques did not fin- 
ish. 

Pacing, 2:25 class, two in three heats: 

Lenora McKinney (Durfee) 1 1 

Col. Mc. (McLellan) 2 3 

Hal Mc. (McClain) 4 2 

Dotty (Linbarger) 3 4 

Time— 2:18, 2:19. 

Jay Direct (Hewitt) 1 1 

Rancho Del Paso (Burton) 2 2 

Time— 2:18, 2:19. 

Trotting, 2:30 class, two in three heats. 

Sea Girl (Linbarger) 5 1 1 

Carrucers (Durfee) 1 2 2 

Jack Conner (Mosher) 2 3 3 

Bonnie Ted (Thomas) 3 4 4 

Julia Clay (Nesmith) 4 5 5 

Time— 2:26 2:22, 2:22. 

Areno scratched. 

This I understand will be the last matinee given 
at the old track, for within a few days I'm told the 
improvements will be begun and the first thing will 
be the tearing up of the present track to make room 
for the State buildings and simultaneously with the 
destruction of the old track the construction of 
the new one and the stabling and grand stand will 
be begun, and rushed to completion so as to enable 
the horses to get back to work in time for their 
summer engagement. 

Mr. J. C. Rouse, secretary of the El Paso, Texas, 
Fair Association, has accepted an invitation from a 
number of gentlemen here to come and look over 
the ground and and give them the benefit of his 
judgment and experience in regard to the fair that 
will be given here next fall in connection with the 
harness races. Mr. Rouse is expected tomorrow or 
Thursday and will not only be taken to Agricultural 
Park but around the neighboring country, to the 
beaches and outlying towns and introduced to promi- 
nent business men in the city, with a view to inter- 
esting them in the project. That. Mr. Rouse is a suc- 
cessful fair manager is shown by the El Paso fair. 

Though the entries for the Canfield-Clark stakes 
do not close till tonight, nominations in both stakes 
have been coming in very freely for the last week 
or ten days. 

W. A. Glascock has a likely two-year-old pacer by 
Murray M. in J. S. Stewart's stable. He worked a 
mile last week in 2:36% and stepped the last quar- 
ter in 34 seconds. He is a very well developed, 
strong built colt and rejoices in I he unusual name 
of Atlantic Fleet, having been born the day the war- 
ships arrived. 

Ethel G., the four-year-old by Zombro in J. S. 
Stewart's barn, is certainly coming to her speed 
quickly. With less than a month's work she stepped 
a quarter last Friday in 34 seconds and the last 
eighth in 16% seconds and did it smothly and within 
herself. 

Charles Chick has sold his good looking young 
black mare Mazeppa for $300. but be has a number 
of others to matinee. 

Mr. Sapovida is breaking his Audubon Boy colt out 
of a Zombro mare, but has not begun to drive him 
yet. He is a beautiful two-year-old and knows noth- 
ing but pace. Sapovida is not a believer in early 
development and intends to let the colt get age and 
strength before doing anything with him. 

Notwithstanding the very changeable weather we 
have had here, one day hot, the next cold, and the 
third rainy, the horses out at the track all seem to 
be in good health, very few having colds. 

W. G. Durfee is improving in health and is now 
regularly at the track working his string. Frank 
Wood, his second, has recovered from his attack 
of la grippe and is back in a cart again 

JAMES. 

Catalogues for the Pleasanton sale will be out next 
week. About 100 head of trotters and pacers will 
have their pedigrees tabulated in this book. 

o 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 5, 1910. 



BON VOYAGE AT SAN JOSE. 



In casting about for a stallion with which lo mate 
his trotting-bred mares, an owner usually asks for 
more qualifications than any one horse possesses. 
It is one of the peculiarities of breeders that, they 
look to the sire to produce all the good qualities ex- 
pected in the foals, and are ready to condemn him if 
the foals are not up to the standard they have set. 
One of the reasons therefore for the popularity of 
Bon Voyage as a sire is the fact that he comes as 
near filling the requirements of an ideal stallion as 
any horse standing for public service on this coast. 

The first question asked by the breeder looking 
for a stallion to mate his mares with is "How is he 
bred?" 

The second is: "How did he race?" 

The third: "Does he transmit his speed?" 

Taking these questions up in their order, we will 
endeavor to give our readers a few facts from the 
records, and after giving them allow breeders to 
draw their own conclusions. 

In the first place, Bon Voyage is by Expedition 
2:15%, which the majority of breeders now consider 
the best bred of the best producing sons of the great 
Electioneer, as he was out of Lady Russell, a great 
brood-mare that was a full sister to the peerless 
Maud S. 2:08%. The dam of Bon Voyage is Bon 
Mot, that great brood-mare by Erin 4372, a grandly 
bred son of Belmont 64, sire of Nutwood 600. Bon 
Mot's dam was Farce 2:29% by Princeps 536, son of 
Woodford Mambrino and a mare by Abdallah 15, her 
grandam was Roma, producer of three standard trot- 
ters by Golddust 150, a great brood-mare sire, and 
her great grandam was by Pilot Jr. 12, one of the 
greatest sires of brood-mares that the country has 
ever produced. Among the sensational trotters 
closely related to Bon Voyage through his sire or 
dam are Exalted 2:07%, Jack Leyburn 2:04%, Arion 
2:07%, Sadie Mac 2:06%, Lord Roberts 2:07%, 
Major Delmar 1:59%, Maud S. 2:08%, Goldsmith 
Maid 2:14, Kremlin 2:07% and many others. Bon 
Voyage has no Wilkes blood in his veins, the fami- 
lies from which he comes being the Electioneer, Har- 
o!d, Belmont, and Princeps, with such brood-mares 
for antecedents as Green Mountain Maid, Miss Rus- 
sell, Eventide, Bon Mot, Roma and others whose 
fame as progenitors of speed are firmly established. 

The qualifications of Bon Voyage as a racehorse 
are recent history, as he is now but eight years old. 
In 1904, he was a two-year-old and made his first 
start at Cincinnati in a $3,000 purse, winning the 
race in straight heats in 2:17% and 2:15%. Just 
stop a minute and see how many two-year-olds you 
can recall to mind that have ever trotted that fast at 
any time during their two-year-old form, let alone 
their first race. This was during the last week in 
September, and on October 5th that year he won 
the Kentucky Futurity for two-year-olds in the same 
fashion, the two heats being in 2:15 and 2:15%, 
wonderful time for a two-year-old in a field of nine 
colts. A week later that wonderful two-year-old. 
Jack Axworthy, managed to defeat Bon Voyage, but 
the Expedition colt was at his collar both heats, 
which were in 2:15% and 2:16%. Bon Voyages 
winnings that year were $9,500. 

The next year, in his three-year-old form, he won 
$11,500. September 6th, at Hartford, Conn., he met 
a field of six high-class three-year-olds, among them 
Jack Leyburn, whose record is now 2:04%. Bon 
Vovage defeated the bunch in straight heats in 2:12% 
and 2:14%, the stake being worth $8,500. At Cin- 
cinnati he got second money in a $10,000 stake, at 
Columbus second money in another stake of the 
same value, at Lexington fourth money in the 
Futurity, and third money in the Lexington stake. 
The on': - times he was beaten was when Susie N. 
won the race in time better than Bon Voyage's rec- 
ord, and she usual'y beat 2:10 in her races. Every 
race Ik- trotted showed his gameness and he was 
beaten only because he was up against a faster 
trotter, and he always got some of the money. His 
racing was confined to his two and three-year-old 
forms and he won $20,000 and was sold for $10,000 
to bis present owner, W. S. Clark, Jr. 

Having considered Bon Voyage's breeding and his 
abilities as a racehorse, we will now look at him as 
a sire. His oldest foals are now three years old, 
consequently any of his get that have made any 
showing must have made it last year as two-year- 
o'ds. The first one of the Bon Voyages to start 
was Sweet Bow, a filly owned by L. H. Todhunter of 
Sacramento. It was in the Pacific Breeder's Futur- 
ity at Salinas in August that Sweet Bow made her 
first appearance. There were eight good two-year- 
olds in this race, but she won first money and had 
a record of 2:17% when the race was over. The 
Oregon State Fair Futurity of 1909 was won by 
Bonaday, another two-year-old by Bon Voyage, his 
fastest heat being 2:27%. Over at Columbus Bon 
Vivant, another son of Bon Voyage, took a record of 
2:16% and was the fastest colt trotter of 1909, while 
at Fresno Voyageur took a two-year-old record of 
2:24%, and at Chicago Viaticum took a two-year-old 
record of 2:29 to wagon. This made five of Bon 
Voyage's first crop of colts to enter the list last year 
as two-year-olds. In addition to these several of his 
two-year-olds were worked and given trials as fol- 
lows: Bonalette 2:20%, Jean Val Jean 2:21%, Bon 
Guv 2:24, Phyllis Wynn 2:26%, La Voyage 2:29%. 
Bon McKinney, a yearling, was worked a quarter 
in 35 seconds and a half-mile in 1:15. 

The above history of Bon Voyage is proof positive 
that he is fashionably bred, a fast and game race- 



horse, and a great sire of early and extreme speed. 
Nothing more need be said. He is now at the new 
San Jose racetrack, in care of Ted Hayes, who will 
be pleased to show him at any time or answer any 
questions by mail. Attention is called to the adver- 
tisement in this issue. 

OREGON STATE FAIR REPORT. 

The annual report of Secretary Frank Welch, of 
the Oregon State Board of Agriculture submitted 
last week to the board at its annual meeting held 
in the Senate Chamber at the State House, showed 
that the total receipts of the 1909 State Fair were 
$61,892.16, a gain of nearly $7000 over the fair of 
1908, when the receipts were $55,172.57. After pay- 
ing all bills the secretary reported a balance in 
the bank of $5837.85. 

Among the betterments for the future, recom- 
mended by Secretary Welch, are a livestock amphi- 
theater with a seating capacity of 5000 people and 
with an arena 100 by 250 feet and the adoption of 
a "horse show classification," which would require 
the use of the amphitheater during the evening. 

A new and modern agricultural and horticultural 
pavilion and the conversion of the present main 
pavilion into a machinery hall are greatly needed. 

An extended water system with enlarged mains 
and with a cistern and hydrant system for fire pro- 
tection, the erection of a water tower, more wells 
and sanitary drinking fountains are almost neces- 
sary. 

Four additional comfort stations similar to the 
one built last year should be erected. 

A half-mile racetrack inside of the present mile 
track, affording an opportunity for automobile and 
other races, is sought. 

The purchase of 20 acres of land south of the 
present camping grounds to provide more camping 
space and room for stabling horses of campers, and 
the purchase of terminal facilities west of the South- 
ern Pacific depot, would, it is said, be a great aid. 

Electric lighting system, to be owned by the State, 
and a parking system for the grounds, with native 
trees, shrubs and flowers, would add attractively to 
the fair. 

Owing to the death of M. D. Wisdom, vice-presi- 
dent, and the serious illness and resignation of W. 
F. Matlock, president, there will be no president's 
report this year. 

On account of the absence of Henry Booth, one 
of the members, who was unable to attend on ac- 
count of his brother's death, the election of officers 
was postponed until February 5. All of the other 
members were present. 

o 

PLANS DISTRICT FAIR. 



After the Pleasanton race meet of last fall the 
holding of a district fair at Pleasanton each year was 
advocated on the ground that it would not only 
tend to make a high grade race meet but would in- 
clude a display of stock and farm products which 
would arouse general interest and make the entire 
enterprise more profitable. The Pleasanton people 
endorsed the idea and have been moving along that 
line ever since. 

According to the Times the proposition is taking 
shape and it is probable that the initial fair will be 
held in August of this year. 

The preliminary plans for the affair were made at 
a meeting of business men held at the Rose hotel 
recently. 

The fair, if carried out as planned, will be the 
largest and most ambitious ever attempted by the 
eastern portion of Alameda county. It will extend 
over a period of a week at least and several attract- 
hibits and industrial displays. In conjunction with 
the fair proper a race meet will be held at which all 
the fastest trotting stock on the Coast w-ill be asked 
to enter. 

The men at the head of the fair plan are C. L. 
Crellin and H. E. Armstrong of Pleasanton and A. J. 
Abbrott and W. E. Meese of Danville. 

Mr. C. L. Gifford. of Lewiston, Idaho, who recently 
paid $8000 for Aerolite (3) 2:11%, public trial 2:05% 
as a three-year-old, called at the "Breeder and Sports- 
man" office on Wednesday of this week, and by 
the time this paper is printed will doubtless be on 
his way to Lewiston with this fast and royally 
bred young stallion. Aerolite will make the sea- 
son of 1910 at the Clarkston track, which is just 
across the river from Lewiston, and in the fall Mr. 
Gifford will have him trained to reduce his record. 
He will probably send Aerolite to Sutherland & 
Chadbourne of Pleasanton, who gave him all the 
training he ever had, and both these gentlemen are 
certain that a mile well below 2:05% will be easy 
for him when In condition. Mr. Gifford is highly 
pleased with his purchase and he has every reason 
to be as he now owns one of the fastest pacers ever 
foaled, and one of the best bred stallions living. Mr. 
Gifford carried home with him a tabulated pedigree 
of Aerolite that extends back six removes and 
shows how closely related the horse is to the lead- 
ing sires of extreme speed. 

The San Joaquin Driving Club met at Stockton on 
Friday evening of last week, with President Sher- 
wood in the chair. The meeting was an enthusiastic 
one and it was proposed that the secretary communi- 
cate with the clubs in nearby cities with a view of 
holding a series of matinees during the coming sea- 
son. It is very probable that San Joaquin County 
will hold an old-fashioned county fair this year. 



NORTH PACIFIC FAIR ASSOCIATION. 

Portland, Ore., Jan. 28. — Formation of a Western 
Fair Association, which is planned for the country 
west of the Rocky Mountains, what the American 
Trotting Association and the National Trotting 
Association are for the East, was projected yester- 
day by the North Pacific Fair Association, which 
appointed a committee of five to work on the mat- 
ter and report back at the next annual meeting. 

Increased interest in racing in the Western coun- 
try was the reason given for the action of the North 
Pacific Association in planning the new organiza- 
tion. It was contended that in the extreme West 
there are no organizations which work for the com- 
mon advancement of racing interests for the entire 
section, and that the time has now arrived when 
such an association should be formed. 

The committee having the matter in hand is com- 
posed of the new officers of the North Pacific Fair 
Association and G. A. Westgate, of Portland, and 
R. H. Cosgrove of Spokane. The next annual meet- 
ing, at which the committee will submit its report, 
will be held in Spokane on the first Thursday in Feb- 
ruary, 1911. 

New officers for the North Pacific Fair Associa- 
tion were elected yesterday as follows: President, 
F. A. Welch, of Salem: Vice-President, W. H. Gib- 
son, of Boise, Idaho; Secretary and Treasurer, John 
W. Pace, of North Yakima, Wash. The board of 
appeals consists of the foregoing officers and G. A. 
Westgate, of Portland and Dan Currie of Everett. 

Seattle is no longer on the map of the association, 
for Guy McL. Richards, representative of the Seattle 
Fair Association, became disgruntled yesterday be- 
cause his city could not get the dates desired by him 
for their next meet, and withdrew from the organ- 
ization. 

Mr. Richards insisted that the dates for the Seat- 
tle meet should be September 1 to 8, inclusive, but 
this, it was explained to him, was contrary to the 
rules of the association, which provide that all meets 
must begin with the first week in which they start. 

Dates set for the various associations to meet, 
were as follows: 

Everett, August 30-September 3; Portland, Sep- 
tember 5-10; Salem, September 12-17; Walla Walla, 
September 19-24; North Yakima, September 26- 
October 1; Spokane, October 3-8; Lewiston and 
Boise, October 10-15. 

Centralia and Chehalis were unable to agree on 
dates, and will act independently. The delegates 
present were: 

G. McL. Richards, of Seattle; G. A. Westgate and 

E. L. Thompson, of Portland; W. H. Gibson, of Boise: 

F. A. Welch and George Chandler, of Salem; Dr. E. 
C. Truesdale, of Centralia; G. R. Walker, of Che- 
halis: J. W. Pace, of North Yakima: W. A. Ritz, 
Walla Walla; Dan Currie and T. J. Olliver. of Ev- 
erett; L. L. Wisdom, of Portland; Vice-President 
R. H. Cosgrove and J. A. Schiller, of Spokane. Mr. 
Cosgrove presided in the absence of President W. 
F. Matlock, of Pendleton, who is dangerously ill at 
St. Vincent's Hospital, in this city. 

The association adopted a new constitution and 
by-laws, the special change in them being the elimi- 
nation of the provision formerly included in them 
to have the meeting held in Portland. This will 
allow the association to meet at any place selected 
at a previous meeting. 

It was decided that the entries for the early 
events should close July 1, and those for the late 
events should close in Portland and Everett, August 
10, and for the other places September 1. 

All the delegates pledged their respective asso- 
ciations to collect 2 per cent of the purse repre- 
sented for harness horses at the time each entry is 
made. In the past it has been the experience that 
much money was lost by not enforcing this rule. 

KENTUCKY TROTTING HORSE BREEDERS. 



The annual meeting of the stockholders in the 
Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders' Association was 
held at Lexington, January 18th. and the following 
officers were re-elected: 

Richard C. Stoll, president: R. C. Estill, first vice- 
president: Col. James E. Clay, second vice-president: 
Horace W. Wilson, secretary; Lexington City Na- 
tional Bank, treasurer; John R. Allen, L. V. Hark- 
ness, John R. Hagyard, J. W. Stoll and Louis des Cog- 
nets, directors. 

The financial report was heard and passed and it 
showed a profit in iast year's business in spite of the 
two handicaps and bad weather in the second week. 
The usual resolution to renew the Kentucky Futurity 
and other stakes were passed upon and the futurity 
will still be on the three in fine plan. 

o 

The new stallion law in Pennsylvania which re- 
quires that all stallions standing for public service 
in that State must have their breeding certified to 
before the owner is issued a license, has resulted in 
showing that less than one-third of the stallions 
standing for service in Pennsylvania are pure bred. 
Out of the sixty-seven counties all but ten have 
as many or more grade than pure bred stallions, 
and a large proportion of the grades have no par- 
ticular resemblance to any breed. Many counties 
have several times as many grades as pure-breeds. 
Seven counties have no pure-bred stallions, al- 
though one of these has nineteen grades. On the 
other hand Mercer County is credited with forty-nine 
pure-breds and only twenty-two grades. Altogether 
there are 1,967 stallions listed in the State, 659 of 
which are pure-breds and 1.308 grades. 



Saturday, February 5, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



6 



3 NOTES AND NEWS J 

Dates for the North Pacific Circuit have been 
a mnunced and will be found elsewhere in this issue. 



There is talk of organizing a new governing body 
(o control harness racing in the Northwest. 

The Oregon State Fair had a cash balance of over 
$5000 last year. 



The famous trainer and driver Ed. Geers cele- 
brated his 59th birthday on January 25th. 



Mr. B. L. Elliott, of Los Angeles, has sold his stal- 
lion. Sherwood, to parties in Imperial Valley. 



Ardmaer Farm has sent George O., 2:05%, Silk 
Cord, by Prodigal, and Rio McKinney, a brother to 
Sweet Marie, to Alta McDonald. 



The old trotting gelding, Ole, 2:10, by Silas Skin- 
ner, is now owned at El Centro, California, and is a 
frequent winner at the matinees. 



The Onward Silver trotter Peter Pan, who was one 
of the speed sensations at The Lexington, Ky., track 
when a two-year-old in 1907, is to be raced this sea- 
son. 



With H. J. Kline as secretary, the meeting at Grand 
Rapids, Mich, which will be during the week preced- 
ing the opening of the Grand Circuit at Kalamazoo, 
should be a success of the most brilliant sort. 



John Splan has been instructed by W. E. D. Stokes 
to begin the purchase of mares to take the place of 
the 29 head destroyed in the recent fire at Patchen 
Wilkes Farm, Lexington, Ky. 



Some horses are born pacers, others achieve the 
pacing gait and others have it thrust on them with 
the aid of hopples. 



Charles L. Kline, of Reading, Pa., has purchased 
of A. H. Kretz, also of Reading, the promising young 
filly, Wedding Bells, by Monbells, 2:23%, dam a full 
sister to Ralph Wilkes, 2:06%. The purchase price 
mentioned was $500. 



General C. C. Watts has decided that his great 
stallion, General Watts 2:06%, will make the com- 
ing season in Kentucky. His book will be limited to 
fifty mares, approved, though in a;I probability he 
will be trained in 1911 and raced. 



A Missouri horseman who has been very success- 
ful in breeding horses for cavalry use, says he often 
mates thoroughbred mares with trotting-bred stal- 
lions, but has never met with much success by 
reversing this cross. 



Dick Wilson, the well-known Rushville, Ind., 
trainer expects to try the extreme West in 1910 and 
will shortly move to Portland, Oregon. He will take 
the stallion, The Patchen Boy, to Portland for the 
season of 1910. 



The wel'-known W T estern trainer Arlie Frost is 
spending the winter months at Phoenix, Ariz., and 
reports his string of 1910 prospects as being in per- 
fect form. The fast sidewheeler High Fly 2:04V 2 by 
Nearest is being worked at the trot and is said to be 
taking kindly to the gait. 



Seven two-year-olds by Prodigal entered the 2:30 
list in 1909— Louise Wilson 2:13%, Senator Stone 
2 2514, Sybil Knight 2:22V 2 . Tobe Woods 2:29%, 
Bobby Gibbs 2:27%, Maggie Prodigal 2:29, Carrie 
Kerr 2:30. 

An eastern turf paper says: More interest is 
being manifested in the harness game at this period 
than at any previous time and any person so for- 
tunate as to own something above the ordinary and 
does not place an exhorbitant value on him can find 
a ready market. 



The three-year-old colt, The Poet Laureate by Kla- 
tawah 2:05V 2 , out of Belle Vara 2:08% (dam of Belle 
Vara Boy 2:14% and Luther Burbank 2:21%) by 
Vatican, "is considered a rare good youngster. He is 
owned by the Danforth Farm, Washington, 111., and 
is in charge of the well known trainer Horace Childs. 

Henry T. Coates, author of several books pertain- 
ing to the trotting horse, died at his home near 
Philadelphia January 22d at the age of 66 years. Mr. 
Coates owned the pacing stallion Saladin 2:05% by- 
Sultan that was bred by the late L. J. Rose of Los 
Angeles. The horse is still living at Mr. Coates' 
farm at Berwyn, Pa. 



Baronella 2:21%, a new pacing performer to the 
credit of Baron Wilkes 2:18 and owned by A. II. 
Drury, of Athol, Mass., must have indeed had "easy 
pickin'" the past season through the section in 
which she campaigned as she was seven times first, 
once second and once third, out of nine starts. It 
takes considerably more than 2:21% speed to land 
that number of victories in this locality. 



W. V. Bennett's pacing filly Clara Collins by Arner 
2:17%, dam Martha Blaine by Arthur Wilkes, is now 
in Ted Hayes' stable at San Jose. She will be bred 
to Bon Voyage and also trained to take a fast 
record this year. 

Helen Keyes, the very fast Sidney Dillon mare 
owned by Harry D. Brown of San Jose is heavy in 
foal to Bon Voyage and will be bred back to the 
same horse this year. 



Bon Volante, W. A. Clark Jr.'s two-year-old by 
Bon Voyage, dam Missie Medium, acts like a very 
promising trotter. The third time worked this year 
he trotted a full mile for Ted Hayes over the new 
track at San Jose in 2:38, and acted as though he 
could have gone much faster. 



A. L. Nichols, of Chico, writes that his mare Silver 
Benton by Senator Boggs, is safely in foal to Bon 
Voyage and unless Mr. Nichols disposes of her he 
will breed her to Bon Voyage again this year . 



Early in the field for the harness rasing season of 
1910, the Rockland County Fair Association, of which 
S. M. Klotz is secretary, has announced four handi- 
caps of $1,000 each to be trotted and paced at the 
meeting to be held in connection with the annual fair 
at Orangeburg, N. Y., September 5th to 10th. Each 
purse is to be divided into seven parts, or seven 
moneys. 



Dr. David F. Herspring, the popular veterinary 
dentist of Woodland is doing a good work by induc- 
ing all his friends among the trotting horse breed- 
ers of Yolo county, to have their stock registered. 
The time to register is while the evidence is obtain- 
able. Very often it is impossible to register an 
animal because the certificates from the breeders 
cannot be had. 



Robert Ogden of Yolo county owns the mare Irish 
Girl by Lynwood W. 2:20, sire of Sonoma Girl 2:05%, 
dam Brush Rose by Montana Wilkes, second dam 
the registered mare Brilliant by Mambrino Diamond. 
Mr. Ogden will have Brush Rose registered so that 
he may register Irish Girl who will then be eligible 
under rule 1. 



The pacing filly, Baroness Evelyn (2), 2:24%, a 
full sister to the futurity winner, Baroness Review 
(3), 2:08%, has been sold by Sam Fleming & Son 
of Terre Haute, Ind., to Lon McDonald, who will take 
the filly to Macon, Ga., and prepare her for her 
futurity engagements. Baroness Evelyn is very fast 
and was given her record last season merely as a 
precaution. 



There is considerable argument on the ice tracks 
in Canada as to the relative abilities of the two 
promising young pacers, Joe Patchen 2d by Joe 
Patchen 2:01% and Hal B. Jr. by Hal B. 2:04% and 
when they meet there will surely be an abundance 
of coin placed on the result. Both are fast and have 
a great following, so that a race for blood is ex- 
pected when the sons of the two former stars clash. 



Just. It Sure has been sold to Miss C. Eva Buller, 
of Vancouver, B. C, who now drives her on the road. 
This mare is by Nearest, 2:22, dam Babe, by Dan ton 
Moultrie, and James W. Rea, Of San Jose, says she 
can pace a mile in 2:10. Danton Moultrie 17046 
was by Guy Wilkes, out of Carrie Malone, dam of 
Cassiar 2:26 and Carrie B. ,2:18, the dam of Ray 
o' Light (3) 2:08%. Carrie Malone is a full sister to 
Klatawah (3) 2:05%, Chas. Derby 2:20, etc. 



Mr. C. J. Uhl, of Vacaville, owner of that fast 
pacer and good winner of last year Solano Boy 2:07%, 
called at the "Breeder and Sportsman" office this 
week. He reports Solano Boy in fine shape, getting 
roadwork every day and running in grass fetlock 
deep during part of the day. Solano Boy will be in 
the races again this year if there are enough purses 
for classes to which he is eligib'.e. Mr. Uhl owns a 
three-year-old by Bon Voyage out of a full sister to 
Father McKinnon, sire of Solano Boy, that Sam Hoy, 
the popular Winters trainer will handle this year. 



Geo. A. Kelly, owner of that fast trotting and 
highly bred stallion Bonnie McK. 2:29% by Mc- 
Kinney, and who has resided at Wal'a Walla for the 
past four years, was in town this week. He is lo- 
cated at Pleasanton with his horses, having two 
of Bonnie McK.'s colts there in training. The dam 
of Bonnie McK. is that famous mare Bonsilene 2: 14% 
by Stamboul 2:07%, and his grandam is Bon Bon 
2:26, dam of Bonnie Direct 2:05%, Bonnie Steinway 
2:06%, etc., by Simmons. We don't know where 
there is a better bred trotter than Bonnie McK. and 
he can always show his speed. Mr. Kelly has been 
giving him jogging work since he reached Pleas- 
anton, but let him step a quarter in 31 seconds one 
day last week and it seemed play for him. 



Dr. J. C. McCoy says: "I wish to go on record 
as saying that I have believed for years, and still 
believe, that the trotting gait is as fast, or faster, 
than the pacing gait, and I believe faster; than when 
the final speed of the trotter and that of the pacer 
have been reached there will come a trotting stal- 
lion who will go a faster mile in harness than a 
pacer has ever gone. If I live as long as the rest 
of my family have lived I expect to see a two-year- 
old trot in 2:05 and a three-year-old trot in 2:02 or 
better." 



Fantasy (4), 2:06, whose record still stands as the 
best for trotting fillies of that age, is reported sale 
with foal to Alliewood, 2:09V*;, the premier stallion 
at Wilton Stock Farm, Havre de Grace, Md., the 
breeding establishment of Henry A. Brehm of Balti- 
more. After being sold from Village Farm, where 
she was bred, she was owned for a few years by 
Wynfromere Farm, Greens Farms, Conn., and since 
1901, when she had a filly foal by The Beau Ideal. 
2:15%, has not been productive. 



Mr. B. L. Elliott, the well known real estate dealer 
of Los Angeles, has sold his mar? Icehee by Chas. 
Derby 2:30, dam Abanteeo 2:17V 2 , by Anteeo 2:16%, 
second dam by Abbotsford 2:19%. etc., to Mr. Bow- 
man, of El Centro, California, who immediately 
booked her to Zombro 2:11. Icehee was never 
trained, but is a perfect driver with great natural 
speed. Elliott recently sold his stallion Gen. Sher- 
wood (three-year-old record 2:28%) to a company 
at Imperial for $2000. 

A protest comes from William Morgan of Pasa- 
dena because the name of his beautiful and famous 
Zombro mare, Ere 2:10, has been printed in the 
Breeder and Sportsman as Eva. Mr. Morgan will 
please accept the apologies of our proofreader. The 
name Era may have borne some resemblance to Eva 
in the manuscript of our Los Angeles correspondent, 
but the proofreader who permitted the fame of the 
only Era 2:10 to be overshadowed by a name that in 
all trotting annals has never been carried around a 
mile track faster then 2:19% deserves a reprimand 
much stronger than the one here given. 



In the Middle West and Southern States many 
small harness racing circuults are organized annually, 
comprising seven or eight towns with population 
ranging from 2,000 to 5,000, where there are half- 
mile tracks. The programs are made up of two $5(10 
stakes, which close early, and and enough $300 
purses closing a week or two before each meeting, 
to make up three days racing. These small circuits 
do much to keep up the interest in breeding and rac- 
ing harness horses, and many trotters and pacers 
graduate from these small circuits into the Grand 
Circuit. 



Since the death of Patchen Wilkes, which took 
place at the farm of H. C. McVey, in Danville, 111., 
several weeks ago, only four sons of George Wilkes 
are still living. They are Gambetta Wilkes, at the 
farm of J. P. Cecil, Danville, Ky.; Baron Wilkes, 
on a breeding farm at Emporia, Kan.; William L, 
on a farm at Wheeling, W. Va., and Woodford Wilkes, 
at the Sherwood Farm, Sheldon, Iowa. Gambetta 
Wilkes is now 29 years old; Baron Wilkes, William L. 
and Woodford Wilkes, each 28. They are all still in 
active service, and had represetnatives in the 2:10 
and 2:30 lists of trotters in 1908 and 1909. 



Samuel L. Caton, one of the best known of the old- 
time trainers and drivers in America, died in this 
city on the 21st of January. Mr. Caton is a brother 
of Frank Caton, who is now one of the most promi- 
nent trainers in Russia. Samuel Caton was at one 
time in the employ of S. A. Brown, of the Kalamazoo 
Stock Farm, and also of C. F. Emery, of the Forest 
City Farm. Caton is the man who brought out the 
famous Bell Boy 2:19%, son of Electioneer and 
Beautiful Bells, and sold him for a big price. A few 
years ago Sam Caton went to Russia, but returned 
to America after a short time, and for the past year 
or two has been in San Francisco. He was a very 
quiet and unassuming man, and few California horse- 
men were aware that he resided in this State. 



II. S. Hogoboom, of Woodland, has consigned the 
stallion Arthur W. 2:11% and the three-year-old 
registered stallion Judge Gaddis 46439 to Chase's 
Pleasanton sale. Arthur W. 2:11% is a big horse, 
standing over 16 hands, and got his record in a race. 
He is by Wayland W. 2:12%, the sire of Bolivar 
2:00%, and his dam -is Lady Moor, dam of John A. 
2:12%, by Grand Moor 2374, grandam of the Dins- 
more mare by Glencoe. Judge Gaddis, the three-year- 
old colt, is by Palo King 44910 (son of Marengo 
King, sire of Marie N 2:08%) and his dam is Dia- 
walda by Diablo 2:09%, second dam Walda by Wald- 
stein, third dam Rosa by Guy Wilkes, fourth dam 
Rosebud by Del Sur, fifth dam Blanche by Athurton 
sixth dam Nancy by Gen. Taylor. This is a royally 
bred colt. Blanche his fifth dam is the dam of six 
standard performers. As a two-year-old, Judge Gad- 
dis worked a mile in 2:32% and his is entered and 
paid up to date in the Breeders' Futurity for this 
year. 



Belmont Driving Club has been awarded dates in 
the "Big Fair" Circuit, conditional on building a 
half-mile track, and the stockholders at a special 
meeting last week voted to go ahead with the 
project. Estimates will be solicited for constructing 
a half-mile track wholly inside the present mile track 
and also for utilizing the present home stretch for 
both the mile and the half-mile tracks. The fact that 
it is deemed necessary to build half-mile tracks in- 
side the mile rings at Belmont and Point Breeze, in 
order to conduct harness races with profit in Phila- 
delphia, may strike the casual observer as some- 
what strange, particularly when it is known that 
the demand for the shorter track does not come 
from the people who patronize racing, but from the 
horsemen themselves. The half-mile track perform- 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 5, 1910. 



its, which include the class of horses racing at the 
fairs, fear last mile tracks such as Belmont and 
Point Breeze because of the fast marks that are 
likely to be taken — marks that would take the horse 
out of the class in which he could perform all sea- 
son with safety over the half-mile rings. Mile 
tracks are supposed to be four or five seconds faster 
than half-mile tracks and this difference in record 
might put a horse in a class where he could never 
win. — Trotter and Pacer. 



Mr. F. H. Holloway of the Heniet Stock Farm, ac- 
companied by Dr. D. S. McCarthy of Hemet, has 
. been in town this week. Mr. Halloway claims they 
have one of the best half-mile tracts in California 
at Hemet, and from the time they make in their mat- 
inees down there we think he is not far wrong. Dr. 
McCarthy is president of the Valley Driving Club of 
Hemet and says the outlook for a good season of 
matinee racing is excellent. At the Hemet Stock 
Farm Mr. Holloway has the stallions Geo. W. Mc- 
Kinney 2:14%, full brother to Washington McKinney 
2:17%. Ceo. W .McKinney has already sired a 2:10 
performer with little or no opportunity in the stud 
and all his get show speed. Another stallion at 
Hemet Farm is Armond Lou 2:27%, a handsome 
son of Kinney Lou 2:07%. Armond Lou got his 
record last year as a four-year-old. He is out of 
Catinka 2:20% by Abbotsford and his record is 
no measure of his speed. 

The mare Weatewater, whose picture is shown on 
our title page this week, is a daughter of Sidney Dil- 
lon, her dam the producing mare Lady well 2:16% 
by Electioneer. Weatewater is owned by Mr. A. L. 
Scott of San Francisco. She raced last year, but did 
not take a record. At Los Angeles In June, she 
worked a mile below 2:10 and w'as looked upon as one 
of the fastest trotters in training, but trained off 
and did not show so well in her races. She is now 
at the new San Jose track In Jos. Cuicello's string 
and is in fine shape. She should be one of the fast- 
est of the new standard trotters of 1910. 



Mr. W. A. Clark Jr., owner of Bon Voyage, came 
up from Los Angeles this week on his way to Butte, 
Montana. Mr. Clark is greatly pleased with the 
showing the get of Bon Voyage are making, and is 
confident the son of Expedition will be one of the 
leading sires of extreme speed in America. He states 
that he recently declined an offer of $20,000 for Bon 
Voyage, made by eastern parties. 



William Sinnock of Santa Ana owns the hand- 
some young stallion Don Direct that is 16 hands high 
and weighs about 1100 pounds. Don Direct was 
never on a track but once when he stepped a quar- 
ter in 40 seconds. He was foaled in 1906, is a seal 
brown with a tail that touches the ground. 



The convention of horsemen to meet in this city 
March 2 will be well attended. All the driving clubs 
in the State will send delegates. 



Zolock 2:05% is at the new San Jose Driving 
Park and is making the season at the service fee 
of $50. No horse in America can be bred to with a 
better chance of getting a 2:10 performer. 

o 

FROM THE STATE FAIR TRACK. 



The Sacramento track is in the best of shai>e. Lou 
Mativia, of Dixon, was out looking at it Saturday and 
remarked that he had been on many good winter 
tracks but this leads them all. 

The barns are filling tip fast. All this place needs 
is a nice large room with table and chairs and a fire 
place or stove for cool nights, so that the boys can 
have a comfortable place to congregate, read and 
talk over the good ones, the game ones and the 
' mutts." It would not cost much and would be a 
great advantage. 

Jay Wheeler, the popular horseshoer, w r as very 
much exercised this week because his filly by Marvin 
Wilkes, dam by Berlin had a very bad case of dis- 
temper, but she has so improved that he is now think- 
ing of hanging out his shingle as a vet. 

John Quinn stepped James Marshall's black colt 
by Zombro a quarter in 38 seconds on the trot the 
other day, and drove W. O. Bowers' three-year-old 
by Bon Voyage a quarter in 35 seconds, and a half 
in 1:20. 

W. A. Hunter worked Martha Dean a mile in 2:58, 
a quarter in 40 seconds and an eighth in 17 seconds 
and feels pretty good over it. His black colt Alpha 
Dean has on his first set of shoes and acts like a 
real trotter. 

Al McDonald, who recently came here from Port- 
land, has a two-year-old by Lynwood W. that he is 
just breaking, a nice looking colt by Zolock belonging 
to G. A. Westgate of Portland, a colt by a son of Prod- 
igal owned by Sam Elmore, the salmon king of As- 
toria, a colt by Directwell out of a Silver Bow mare, 
a four-year-old that worked a mile in 2:20 last fall, a 
Zolock colt three years old and a two-year-old owned 
by Mrs. Becker, and the pacer Manuel by Nutwood 
Wilkes owned by Mr. Fonts of Portland. 

The Sacramento Driving Club will be on deck when 
the season opens. It is at present revising its by- 
laws. The first matinee will probably be in April. All 
the club's members favors an organization of all the 
driving clubs in California, and will have delegates to 
the convention in San Francisco, March 2d. 

The secretary of the Pacific Coast Saddle Horse 
Association, W. A. Hunter, states that he has a very 
good entry to the saddle horse futurity No. 1. This 
is the first stake of the kind and is open to the world. 



As there are but a half dozen registered saddle stal- 
lions in the State, the entry is not what it will be 
a few years hence as the gaited horse is growing in 
favor and becoming very popular. Like all other 
horses the saddle horse must have class to be satis- 
factory. 

CAPITA LION. 

o 

MUST SHOW A 2:08 GAIT. 

Pleasanton Training Track, Jan. 31, 1910. 

Editor "Breeder and Sportsman": — To prove to 
the public that we are not all dead at the Pleas- 
anton Training Park and that all the sports have 
not gone to San Jose, I am enclosing a copy of 
a wager made here the other day between Elmer 
Tomer, known to the boys as "Hun," and Geo. 
Kneier of Grand Circuit fame, more commonly 
known as "Rio Vista George": 

This agreement made and entered into bv and 
between Elmer Tomer of Pleasanton. California, 
and Geo. Kneier of Pleasanton. California; that 
said Elmer Tomer has deposited $150 in the hands 
of H. E. Armstrong against $200 deposited by Geo. 
Kneier in the hands of said H. E. Armstrong. 

The mare Proberita is to pace % mile in 32 sec- 
onds or better, on or before May 1st, 1910, on the 
Pleasanton Training Park course. Said mare to 
have three trials and to have 25 minutes between 
heats, and furthermore if said course is not in con- 
dition on above date, trial to take place on the first 
day course is in condition: this to be decided by 
acting judges. 

If said mare Proberita fails to make this time as 
stated above, amount of $350 to revert to said Elmer 
Tomer, and if said mare makes this time or better, 
said amount $350 to revert to said Geo. Kneier. 

Each party to pick a judge and the two judges so 
selected, to select a third judge and said judges to 
decide time of trial. 

^Signed at Pleasanton, this 29th day of January, 

ELMER TOMER. 

GEO. KNEIER, 
Above mare is three years old and owned by Fred 
Heffner of Pleasanton. She shows considerable 
speed on the pace, and is a "pipe" according to 
confidential rumors from her trainer, Mr. Kneier 
She is sired by Mr. Henry Busing's McKinnev stal- 
lion Bonnie McKinney and her dam is by "a son 
of Boodle. 

Yours truly, J. HARRIS COX. 

o 

PROPOSED NEW RULE. 



At the next congresses of the National and Ameri- 
can Trotting Association the following petition will 
be presented by a committee of the Stewards of the 
Grand Circuit, composed of W. W. Collier Wm P 
Engelman and H. K. Devereux: 
To the Rule Comittees of The National and American 
Trotting Asociation. 

Gentlemen:— The Stewards of the Grand Circuit 
respectfully jietition for some legislation that will fix a 
satisfactory difference between a record obtained 
over a mile track as against a record obtained over 
a half-mile track. We believe such legislation to 
be not only fail-, but every year growing more neces- 
sary as the meetings over half-mile tracks grow in 
numbers and importance. We believe also that it 
would result in much benefit to all associations and 
horsemen. It is a self-evident fact that a horse 
having acquired a record over a mile track is bur- 
dened with a handicap of some seconds when re- 
turned to the half-mile track. 

THE GRAND CIRCUIT STEWARDS. 

— o 

ADDING WEALTH TO THE COUNTRY. 

Washington, January 25.— In spite of the greatly 
increased use of the automobile, it has been unable 
to decrease, either in numbers or value, its rival the 
American horse. With automobiles coming into 
common use, the price of horses, according to a 
statement today by the crop reporting board of the 
Department of Agriculture, rose from an average of 
$95.64 a head in 1908 to $108.19 a head in 1909 In 
numbers the horses of the United State sincreased 
from 20,640,000 to 21,040,000, and in value from 
$1,974,052,000 to $2,276,363,000. 

Incidentally the report, which gives the number 
and value of farm animals in the United States on 
January 1, 1910, discloses that the high price of beef 
is in the smallest degree due to a decrease in the 
number of range cattle. Only a slight railing off in 
range cattle is shown from the figures of the previous 
year, while there has been an increase in the number 
of horses, mules, milch cows and sheep. Hogs, how- 
ever, have lost in numerical strength. 

The number of mules was 4,128.000, the average 
price $119.84 a head, and the total value $494,095,000, 
as compared with the previous year, when the num- 
ber was 4.053,000, the average price $107.84 and the 
total value $437,082,000. 

Milch cows numbered 21,801,000; the average price 
was $35.70 and the total value $780,308,000, compared 
with the previous year, when the number wos 21,720,- 
000, the average price $32.36 and the total value 
$702,445,000. 

The number of other cattle was 47,279,000; the 
average price was $19.41 a head and the total value 
$917. 45:;, uuo, as compared with the previous year, 
when the number was 49,379,000, the average price 
$17.49 a head and the total value $863,754,000. 

The number of sheep was 57,216,000; the value 
of them all being $233,664,000, as compared with 



the* previous, when the number was 56,084,000, 
the average price $3.4:! a head and the total value 
$192,632,000. 

The number of swine was 47,792,000; the average 
price was $9.14 a head and the total value was $436,- 
603,000, as compared with the previous year, when 
the number was 54,147,000, the average price $6.55 a 
head and the total value $354,794,000. 

In total value horses increased $302,311,000; mules 
increased $57,013,000; milch cows increased $77,363,- 
000; other cattle increased $53,699,000; sheep in- 
creased $41,032,000; swine increased $81,809,000. 

The total value of all animals enumerated on Jan- 
uary 1, 1910, was $5,138,486,000, as compared with 
$4,525,259,000 on January 1, 1909— an increase of 
$613,227,000, or 13.6 per cent. 

o 

ANOTHER STALLION LAW. 



The "Breeder and Sportsmen" has from time to 
time during the past two years printed synopses of 
stallion laws that have been enacted by different 
States. This has l)een done that our readers may 
become acquainted with such laws as it is more 
than probable that a stallion law will be introduced 
at the next session of the California legislature. The 
following is a synopsis of the Iowa law as it stands 
at present: 

The Iowa stallion law provides that any owner or 
keeper of any stallion, kept for public service, or for 
sale, exchange or transfer, who represents such ani- 
mal to be pure-bred shall cause the same to be regis 
tered in some stud book recognized by the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture at Washington, D. C, and ob- 
tain a certificate of the State Board of Agriculture of 
the State of Iowa. If such registration is found to 
be correct and genuine he shall receive a certificate 
setting forth the name, sex, age and color of the 
animal and the volume and page of the stud book 
book in which such animal is registered. 

Anyone who represents his animal to be pure-bred 
shall place a copy of the certificate of the State 
Board on the door or stall of the stable where the 
animal is usually kept. Any owner or keeper of a 
stallion kept for public service, for which a State 
certificate has not been issued, must advertise such 
horse by having printed handbills or posters not less 
than five by seven inches in size, and such bills or 
posters must have printed thereon immediately 
above or preceding the name of the stallion, the 
words "grade stallion," in type not less than one 
inch in height, said bills or posters to be posted 
in a conspicuous manner at all places where the 
stallion is kept for public service. The certificate 
may be transferred to a purchaser through the sec- 
retary of the State Board of Agriculture. 

Any person who shall fraudulently represent any 
animal, horse, cattle, sheep or swine to be pure- 
bred, or any person who shall post or publish, oi 
cause to be published, any false pedigree or certifi- 
cate, or shall use any stallion for public service, or 
sell, exchange or transfer, any stallion, representing 
such animal to be pure-bred without first having 
such animal registered, and obtaining the certifi- 
cate of the State Board of Agriculture, as above 
provided, or who shall violate any of the provisions 
of this act, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and 
be punished by a fine of not more than $100 or im- 
prisonment in the county jail not exceeding 30 days, 
or both. 

The above provisions are included in Sections 23, 
41-a-b-c and d of the supplement to the code, 1907, 
and the legislature of 1908-9 passed the following law 
giving a lien for the service fee of a stallion: 

"The owner or keeper of a stallion kept for public 
service who has complied with sections 234-a. 1341-b, 
2:!41-c and 2341-d of the supplement to the code, 1907, 
shall have a prior lien upon the progeny of such 
stallion to secure the amount due such owner or 
keeper for the service of such stallion, resulting in 
said progeny, provided, that where such owner or 
keeper misrepresents such stallion by false pedigree 
no lien shall be obtained. 

The lien herein provided for shall remain in force 
for a period of six months from the birth of said 
progeny and shall not be enforced thereafter. 

The owner or keeper of such stallion may enforce 
the lien herein provided by placing in the hands of 
any constable an affidavit containing a descripton of 
the stallion and a description of the dam and the time 
and terms of service, and said constable shall there- 
upon take possession of said progeny and sell the 
same for non-payment of service fee by giving the 
owner of said progeny ten days' written notice, 
which notice shall contain a copy of the affidavit and 
a full description of the progeny to be sold, the time 
and hour when, and the place at which the sale will 
take place and posting for the same length of time 
in three public places in the township of such own- 
er's residence a copy of such notice. If payment 
of the service fee and the costs are not made before 
the date thus fixed, the constable may sell at public 
auction to the highest bidder such progeny and the 
owner or keeper of the stallion may be a bidder at 
such sale. The constable shall apply the proceeds, 
first, in the payment of the costs, second, in the 
payment of the service fee. Any surplus arising 
from sale shall be returned to the owner of the 
progeny. 

The right of the owner or keeper to foreclose, as 
well as the amount claimed to be due, may be con- 
tested by anyone interested in so doing, and the 
proceedings may be transferred to the district court, 
for which purpose an injunction may issue, if neces- 
sary." 

Drink Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Saturday, February 5, 1910.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



SCIENCE IN HORSE BREEDING. 



The following is from the pen of Eugene Daven- 
port, of the University of Illinois, author of "Prin- 
ciples of Breeding," and was written for the Ameri- 
can Horse Breeder of Boston, from the columns of 
which it is taken: 

Mr. William Russell Allen in the Horse Breeder 
of December 14, discussing the speed-trotting prob- 
lem, has raised some interesting questions concern- 
ing the law of transmission. The gist of the article 
is really this: If there is science in breeding and 
if transmission rests upon a scientific basis, then 
why are we not able to breed with some certainty of 
results and why cannot we always secure perform- 
ers? 

It is this phase of the question that I should like 
to discuss briefly in order to show that the business 
of breeding rests upon a scientific basis, even though 
but a comparatively small portion of our animals 
are prize winners or record makers, and even though 
we cannot tell in advance which ones these will be. 

Some sciences are eminently exact. The principles 
involved are few and simple. They may all be known 
in all of their possible operations, in which case we 
can invariably predict results. For instance, two and 
three always make five. Hydrogen and oxygen will 
always combine in definite proportions, either in 
equal parts or with two parts of hydrogen to one of 
oxygen. No other combinations are possible so far 
as known. These are very simple illustrations. 

Other substances combine in very different and 
much more complicated combinations with the pro- 
portions running up into the hundreds, and when we 
get oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulphur and per- 
haps other elements associated in the presence of 
heat, light, electricity and other forces known and 
unknown, there is no predicting in advance what 
may result. We may have two or three or half a 
dozen separate compounds with various residues, and 
we may have an explosion or two. This again is 
but another illustration showing how in the same 
field a problem may change from the simple to the 
complex, from one in which we may easily predict 
the results to one in which such prediction is im- 
possible. 

Let me take another illustration. When but a sin- 
gle cause is in operation we can soon identify the 
result, but as the causes increase in number and in 
the complexity of their actions and reactions, one 
upon another, it becomes increasingly difficult to 
predict results and impossible to do with reference 
to any single case. In other words, as we pass from 
the simple to the complex in this matter of the multi- 
plication of causes, we pass from certainty over 
to probability. Whenever the causes operating to 
produce results are many, then prediction as to any 
single instance becomes impossible, and such, un- 
fortunately, is the case with all breeding opera- 
tions. 

When two individuals are mated, an almost infinite 
ii umber of causes conspire to the production of the 
lesultant offspring. Every ancestor of each parent 
exercises his proper share of production. Not only 
that, but every day of the young thing's life from 
birth during development has some influence upon 
developing or suppressing the various characters born 
into it. As we know now, the hereditary matter be- 
fore fertilization is subject to repeated doublings and 
halvings with the extrusion and loss of large portions 
of this matter before fertilization so that successive 
individuals even from identical parents do not de- 
velop from identical germ plasm. This fact com- 
bined with the infinite number of influences oper- 
ating upon development after birth is reason enough 
why we need not expect successive individuals, even 
from the same parents, to be alike, and it is reason 
enough why we need never hope that all the off- 
spring even of the most highly-selected parents will 
be record-breakers, or even equal to their sire and 
dam. 

All this would be true if we were satisfied with a 
constant standard, but no sooner do we succeed in 
breeding a 2:10 trotter than we aspire to produce 
one that can go in two minutes. Not only that, but 
our desire is that they shall all be record-breakers. 
In other words, we are breeding to a constantly ad- 
vancing standard. We are all the time trying to 
produce the very utmost possible. Not only that, we 
instinctively feel that if breeding rests upon a sci- 
entific basis they would all be maximum performers. 

This is expecting altogether too much. We are 
really operating and must always operate in breed- 
ing operations under the law of probabilities, which 
is as scientific as any law we have in nature. It is 
a law of such character, however, as applies only to 
relatively large numbers and by which nothing can 
be predicted as to an individual excepting that his 
chances may be known. 

Let me endeavor to illustrate this point together 
with that of the simplicity of certain kinds of breed- 
ing. For example, suppose we are interested in color 
rather than in speed of horses. Here is a character 
arising from a single cause, pigment formation. It 
is not a complicated matter. There are but few 
colors in the trotting horses and their proportions 
are accurately known. A study of 13,879 trotters 
shows the following distribution as to color: 

7376 or 53.0 per cent bay. 

1362 or 10.0 per cent black. 

1885 or 13.0 per cent brown. 

2220 or 16.0 per cent chestnut. 
60 or 0.4 per cent dun. 
752 or 6.0 per cent gray. 
224 or 1.5 per cent roan. 
Knowing these facts we can predict definitely the 



chances as to color. That is to say, as matters are 
going now, 53 per cent, or 530 out of 1000 will be bay, 
and so on for the other colors. We shall never be 
able from this to tell what will be the color of the 
next foal, but we can tell what proportion of the foals 
in general will be bays. 

If now we begin to select for color, mating only 
bays, we shall increase the chances for bays and 
decrease the chances for all other colors, until ulti- 
mately if mating is restricted to bays, there will be 
only those occasional appearances of the other colors 
which we call reversions — too few to be considered. 
Some breeds have reached this point. Aberdeen- 
Angus cattle are practically always black, the Devons 
are red and sheep of all breeds are practically 
albinos. Here are cases where probability has been 
reduced to practical certainty and very largely 
through selection. 

This, however, is a very simple problem in breed- 
ing. The character involved arises from a single 
cause, pigmentation. It is absolute and not relative. 
Its development does not depend upon feed or the 
accident of disease nor any other circumstances oper- 
ating during development. 

Now, however, when we pass from this to the prob- 
lem of breeding for speed, it is infinitely more com- 
plex. As has been explained, but a small proportion 
of the animals will be born for highest speed. That 
proportion can now be ascertained by statistical 
methods, and it will hold good for all future opera- 
tions. The proportion can be increased as selection 
is intensified, holding with increasing strictness to 
higher standards. The disposition of the breeder, 
however, to increase his standard and demand higher 
performance tends to decrease the probability of 
success, but the problem remains the same and the 
case is one of probabilities. 

The writer realizes that all this is much like Mr. 
Allen's remark about his own article, and yet he 
hopes he has succeeded in showing that the prob- 
lem of the breeder lies not in the realm of a simple 
science so operating as to make every individual 
operation clear, but that it lies rather in the domain 
of probability and that the business of the breeder 
is to increase the probability by the most careful 
selection of which he is capable, never hoping in his 
fondest dreams that all his individuals will come up 
to his standard even of selection, but, living in con- 
fidence that with each new generation of breeding 
to the definite standard the probability of reaching 
that standard increases. 

University of Illinois, Urbana, 111, .Jan. 12, 1910. 

o 

THE SUCCESS/ UL BROOD MARE. 



As one-half of the elements which form the em- 
bryo of the foal come from the egg cell, it is evi- 
dent that the success of every breeder of horse 
stock depends largely upon the kind of mares se- 
lected for brood purposes. This applies to breeders 
of all kinds of horse stock, whether bred for the 
track, road, family or farm use, or for heavy draft 
purposes, but more especially to those of track, road 
and carriage horses. An article written by A. E. 
Trowbridge of the University of Missouri on this 
subject was published in Colman's Rural World. It 
is as follows: 

Market quotations continually impress us with the 
fact, that the "better grade of horses' and not the 
"common lots" are in demand. The selling price for 
good horses of all grades is such as to allow a good 
margin of profit for the producer. The particular 
emphasis laid upon "better grades" of horses "and 
the prices that they actually command" is only an- 
other proof of wisdom in the selection and mating of 
mares and stallions of the better grade. The oppor- 
mares for improvement is immeasitreable. A glance 
at the class of mares which are sent to the stallion 
in almost any community furnishes ample proof of 
this fact. 

Too many mares which have passed the prime of 
life and which are fit only for partial service on the 
farm are bred with the expectation that their off- 
spring will help to pay for their keep. Other cases 
are very numerous in which the female, expected to 
produce offspring which will ultimately result in 
profit to the owner, is unable to perform very ordi- 
nary labor because of some hereditary unsoundness 
which renders her physically unequal to the task. 
On the other hand, we see many fine young mares 
being mated with the stallion or jack and, as would 
be expected, the class of men who practice such 
systems of horse husbandry are the men who realize 
both profit and pleasure from the business. 

The question often arises as to just what sort of 
horses or mules it is best for the farmer to produce 
and what sort of mares should be used to produce 
this or that given type of horse or mule. This is a 
question which each man must settle in accordance 
with his environment. In settling this question he 
must realize fully that the market shows preference 
for certain classes of horses. In the State of Mis- 
souri we have a variety of types in our horses. This 
presents a problem in horse breeding which if prop- 
erly managed will maintain our State in the fore- 
most rank as a producer of high-class horses and 
mules, but if Improperly managed will lead to dis- 
astrous results. 

We have mares carrying a preponderance of Amer- 
ican trotting horse blood, some of them conforming 
to the race-horse type and many which fill the quali- 
fications of the American carriage horse. We have 
many mares of saddle horse, Morgan and thorough- 
bred lineage. Through some sections of the State is 
found a class of native mares which show the results 



of the draft sires and in almost every section we 
have mares of somewhat mixed breeding which are 
known by a variety of names on the market. The 
good mares of any of these classes may at present 
be utilised in I he production of horses and mules, 
but as soon as the poorer ones of all classes have 
been discarded our capacity for horse and mule 
production will be on a higher level. Those men 
who contemplate breeding mares should consider the 
following qualifications, keeping in mind the old 
truth that ' like produces like" 

The earl est age at which mares should first pro- 
duce foals is a question, but it is certain that to 
yield the greatest profit on the ordinary farm 
should be bred as early as their development will 
warrant, which will vary usually from two to five 
years of age. Once started, these mares should be 
kept breeding regularly. Young mules and young 
geldings can be made to perform that particular 
farm work which would endanger the welfare of a 
mare in foal. Brood-mares should be worked stead- 
ily, thereby obtaining sufficient exercise, an all-im- 
portant factor in the production of healthy foals. It 
is too often the case that mares are not bred until 
they are too old for work. By starting early, the 
length of their period of usefulness as brood-mares 
is increased, and some argue that they increase their 
ability to produce regularly. 

Size is a powerful factor in the determination of 
the values of horse flesh in our present markets. 
Past experience, however, has proven that the mare 
of good size for the breed, with style and action, has 
been the most successful as a producer. It is not 
the ungainly, overgrown mare that produces the 
most serviceable horses, neither is it the dwarfed, 
anaemic specimen that perpetuates the good charac- 
teristics of her kind. Increase in size is one of the 
greatest needs of our lighter class of mares. This 
size can be secured only by the most careful scrutmv 
of aaima's mated. In obtaining this qualification 
great care should be exercised that quality be not 
sacrificed. It is the mare of medium refinement, to 
the point of decreasing size, and constitutional vigor 
that are essential considerations in selecting brood- 
mares. 

In breeding mares having an hereditary unsound- 
ness, we are inviting disaster, for the law that like 
produces like holds good in the majority of cases. 
Blemishes, the results of accidents, are not trans- 
mitted to the offspring. We should always be cer- 
tain, however, that the blemishes are the result of 
accident, otherwise mares thus affected should be 
discarded as brood-mares. There are certain essen- 
tials of conformation for all classes of horses and 
mules, whether for saddle, for harness, or for hard 
labor. A head of sufficient width and features 
plainly outlined are evidence of intelligence and 
good disposition. A neck of good length showing a 
clean-cut windpipe with a clean throat-lath points 
toward good wind. 

Sloping shoulders and sloping pasterns, associated 
with straight, well-set, strongly muscled legs and 
dense, tough feet are extremely essenthial to lon- 
gevity or hard service. The back should be compara- 
tively straight, strong, short, closely coupled, well 
muscled and support a deep chest of medium width, 
good deep ribs and flank. The rump should carry 
width to the tail, which should set fairly high. The 
hind legs of the horse should be set well under the 
body. Strong hocks, well-set and sloping pasterns 
are of great value. True, level action with good style 
is essential in all good horses. 

Close observation will call our attention to the 
fact that our best brood-mares possess real feminine 
character, which gives them power to reproduce suc- 
cessfully. Consequently, along with the character- 
istics of type, age, size, quality, constitution, sound- 
ness, action and conformation we find our greatest 
brood-mares are those possessed of that latent and 
unexplainable quality of real feminine character and 
adaptability to motherhood. 

A report from Lexington is to the effect that the 
breeders in the Blue Grass country contemplate the 
forming of a "mutual sales" company by which the 
output of their stock farms could be disposed of 
at a smaller expense than they now have to pay. 
This scheme includes the purchase of Orchard Park, 
near Lexington, where a big barn might be built, as 
the quarters to be used in stabling, showing and 
selling the horses. Among the prominent breeders 
mentioned in this connection are W. E. D. Stokes, L. 
V. Harkness, John E. Madden, U. S. Senator J. W. 
Bailey, J. K. Newman, W. L. Spears and R. C. Estill, 
all of whom have large nurseries in or near Lexing- 
ton. The ground available for this sale is owned 
by John D. Creighton, of Omaha, who is also a 
breeder of considerable note. But the projectors of 
this plan to revive the auction business in Kentucky 
seem to have overlooked the fact that the locus of 
their vendue is many miles from New York and 
Chicago, the two cities where the big sales have been 
held in recent years. The majority of the harness 
racing stock may be near Lexington, but. the buyers 
are scattered over a wide range of country, which 
as Kipling would say, is another story. Moreover, 
in times long gone by, an ambitions agitator named 
Mahomet desired to bring a mountain within easy 
hail, but found it so firmly fixed that it was easier 
for him to move than to set the elevated land in 
motion. Whatever merit this project of the com- 
bined breeders has, they should carefully consider 
the necessity of securing the presence of the men 
who will make the bids and buy what they have for 
sale. — Trotter and Paecr. 



s 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 5, 1910. 



ROD, GU N AND KENNEL 

CONDUCTED BY J. X. DeWITT. 



PACIFIC COAST TRIALS. 

The Pacific Coast Field Trials Club ran the club's 
twenty-seventh annual trials last week near Bakers- 
field. This meeting was the nineteenth time, ac- 
cording to Judge Post, that the club has met on the 
same grounds. This meet was finished in three 
days, the shortest trials in the history of the club. 

Weather conditions throughout, saving a cold, blus- 
tering rain storm for about two hours in the after- 
noon of the first day, could not have been better. 
Cold, frosty nights followed by clear bracing mornings 
left the ground in almost ideal condition. Birds 
were plentiful, although a bit wild at times, run- 
ning or taking refuge in trees, but generally shak- 
ing the valley quail laid close and gave the dogs 
desirable opportunity for work. In this respect, the 
trials were somewhat disappointing, particularly so 
in the Derby. Time and again dogs had chances 
to find and locate, but failed to establish any other 
effect than that their knowledge of birds was yet 
to be developed. This peculiar conduct of Derbies 
is not a new feature on the Bakersfield grounds. 
Whether it is the alkali soil, the prevalence of many 
jack rabbits and cottontails, the holding of scent by 
the birds or the lack of sufficient work on quail, the 
fact remains that young dogs, and apparently good 
ones on every line, have failed, at times, signally 
to locate and work. There may be some excuse for 
all of the Derbies save one, they had no previous 
experience, or little, in training on quail. Their work 
had been on Chinese pheasants. Several of the 
All-Age dogs that were in the same predicament had 
worked on our quail at previous trials, but here 
also seemed to be at sea for awhile. 

Blue Bonnet, the winner of the Derby, is a hand- 
some white, black eared and ticked bitch by Boy 
Blue out of Tiburon, owned by Jack Chase of San 
Francisco. She is fast and a stylish worker with a 
merry tail. Bonnet shows quality that, when the 
finishing touches of experience and maturity have 
been added, will put her in the front rank. Both 
puppy, dam and sire trace back to Oath. Belle Fon- 
taine her grand dam seems to have happily estab- 
lished herself as the founder of a winning family. 

Jo, a Stockdale Kennels' pointer entry, owned by 
Lloyd Tevis, was awarded second place. He is by 
Houghton's Doc out of Queen, a well put up and 
stylish young dog. 

Norah Blue by Boy Blue out of Lackawana, owned 
by J. G. Roberts of Madera, won third. She has 
good pace, plenty of stamina and pleasing high 
headed style and action. 

Two of Stockdale Kennels' pointers, Sister (Com- 
bination Boy-Pearls Jingo) owned by Lansing Tevis 
and Trap (Sandal wood-Bessie) entered by Gordon 
Tevis were first and second in the Members' stake. 
Sister is a lively goer and a handsome bitch and an 
excellent worker on birds. Trap did not show up 
in the All-Age with the same snap he displayed in 
his first heat in the Members' stake. Lemonade 
(Ch. Kilgarif-Belle Fontaine) owned by Jos. E. Terry 
of Sacramento, was awarded third. Lemmie is as 
pleasing a bitch as one could desire to see work, she 
was outpaced however by the pointers. 

E. Courtney Ford's Tiburon (Uncle Jimmie White- 
stone-Belle Fontaine) first All-Age is a well known 
Coast setter and has proved her mettle at previous 
trials. She was placed equal third in the Coast 
Derby and third in the Pacific Northwest All-Age, 
1908. Last year she ran third in the Pacific Coast 
All-Age. Stockdale Kennels' pointer Sister was 
second. Third place was divided. Jack W. Flynn's 
pointer Senator's Don, a stylish son of Ch. Senator 
P., looking very much like his sire, out of Flynn's 
Dolly Jingo and Jos. E. Terry's English setter Eury- 
dice (Ch. Kilgarif-Moxey Danstone) were given equal 
third by the judges. Don ran third in the Nebraska 
Derby, 1905, and fourth in the Northwestern All-Age, 
1905. Eurydice won the Pacific Coast Derby last 
year and was also placed second in the Oregon All- 
Age, 1909. 

Wm. Dormer of Oakland and P. H. Bryson. now 
of Los Angeles, officiated in the saddle. Both are 
veteran field trial sportsmen. Henry L. Betten of 
Alameda found it impossible, at the last moment, 
to be present and Mr. Bryson was invited to serve 
instead. 

The attendance was not up to past years, but at 
that there was no less a pleasing meeting and en- 
joyable time. Among those present were Hon. Chas. 
N. Post of Sacramento, who has missed but one 
trials in the club's history; Jos. E. Terry, Frank J. 
Hubstaller, Chas. J. Matthews, of Sacramento; John 
W. Considine of Seattle, Wash.; A. A. Moore, S. 
Christenson, E. Courtney Ford, Jack W. Flynn, J. 
M. Kilgarif of San Francisco, John H. Schumacher 
of Los Angeles, Harry Babcock, Lloyd Tevis, Lan- 
sing Tevis, Will Tevis, Prof. Currie, Major Taylor, 
Ned Eyre, Master Eyre, R. E. Ashe and others, 
Ben M. Boggs of Stockdale acted as marshal very 
efficiency. 

Besides the purses offered in the Derby and All- 
Age stakes, there was also a cup awarded for each 
winning dog. These cups were purchased with a 
genrral fund donated by the club members. 



The officers elected at the club's annual meeting 
.Monday evening, January 24th, were the following: 
Hon. Chas. M. Post, Sacramento, president; Jos. E. 
Terry, Sacramento, first vice-president: Lloyd Tevis, 
Stockdale, second vice-president; E. Courtney Ford, 
San Francisco, secretary-treasurer, re-elected. Execu- 
tive Committee — Frank J. Ruhstaller, Sacramento; 
John H. Schumacher, Los Angeles; J. W. Flynn, S. 
Christenson, San Francisco; Henry L. Betten, Ala- 
meda. 

A. A. Moore, J. B. Chase, Orrin Tucker, George W. 
Peltier and H. M. La Rue wer elected to membership. 

It was decided to offer guaranteed purses for the 
1911 Derby and All-Age, $300 for the puppy stake 
and $200 for the other. If the forfeits and entrance 
moneys exceed the stipulated purse totals these 
sums will go w;ith the purses. This action of the 
club will no doubt be an incentive for an increase 
in starters. The purses will be divided 50, 30 and 
20 per cent. 

Resolutions were adopted during the meeting in 
memory of the late W. W. Van Arsdale and Frank 
H. Jermyn. 

The draw Sunday evening for the Derby was the 
following: Jo with The Judge; Shasta Queen with 
Caesar's Keepsake; Linda H. with Miss Ives; Blue 
Bonnet with Belvedere; Norah Blue, a bye. 

Monday, January 24, 1910. — The familiar meeting 
place, Section 17, near Gosford station, about 7 miles 
southwest of Bakersfield, was selected for the open- 
ing heat of the Derby. The morning was crisp and 
fair, ground conditions were excellent. 

Jo-The Judge — The cast-off of the brace was made 
at 9:30 on open grassy ground leading up to scat- 
tered Cottonwood trees and high dry weeds. Both 
young dogs showed fair pace and range, the pointer 
was not under the best control. Judge, when he has 
a proper schooling on birds will be a desirable dog. 
Both chased fur repeatedly. The pointer was a bit 
uncertain in his work on birds and missed several 
chances. He was credited with two points. M. R. 
Dodge handled Jo. W. B. Coutts had Judge. Up at 
10 a. m. 

Shasta Queen-Caesar's Keepsake — Cast off at 10:05 
over the same ground. Coutts handled both dogs. 
Queen showed the best action and is a merry goer. 
Queen proved a wide ranger and quartered well 
but did not have an opportunity to establish herself 
on birds. Caesar fli shed twice where he should 
have pointed. The brace covered ground where 
birds were but did not prove up. Ordered up at 
10:40. 

Linda H-Miss Ives — put down on new ground 
Section 20, 2 miles southeast at 11:15. Started on 
open grassy ground leading up to trees and dry 
weeds. Miss Ives has speed and good ranging abili- 
ties and finished the heat strong. Linda H. was 
short in condition and soon came in close. After 
being taken on ground where birds were neither 
dog seemed to find. Birds were flushed severad 
times by those following, having lain close whilst the 
brace were working the cover. Up at 12. 

hiue Bonnet-Belvidere — Cast off in nearby ground 
at 12:10. Starting away in the open grass for pre- 
liminary action, both set off at a merry clip. Bel- 
vedere is a high headed stylish ranger, and worked 
his ground in a pleasing way. He was not overly 
certain in finding and holding on to his birds. Bon- 
net showed animation and system in Ik r work and 
was steadier on birds, in range and speed she held 
her own. Several staunch points developed, both 
were steady to shot and wing. Bonnet having the 
best of the argument. Both dogs were in charge 
of W. B. Coutts, a hard task for a handler. At 
times the dogs were a considerable distance apart, 
the judges separating and each taking a dog under 
supervision. Up at 12:40. 

This heat was the best run in the forenoon. The 
party adjourned to the Gosford ranch house for 
lunch and shelter from the cold wind ani vain. 

Norah Blue, a bye — Cast off at 3 o'clock in Sec- 
tion 21. — Norah has lots of speed, is a pretty ranger, 
has plenty of style and a slight penchant for fur. 
Birds were found in good working cover, but she 
neglected to show her abilities in bird work, under 
good control, however. Up at 3:40. 

The judges announced Blue Bonnet with Jo, The 
Judge with Belvidere and Norah Blue reserve, as 
the dogs carried into the second series. 

Blue Bonnet-Jo — Down at 3:55 in the eastern half 
of Section 21. Bonnet's showing was better than 
Jo. Neither dog had opportunity on birds. Dp at 
4:30. 

Belvidere-The Judge — Sent away over name ground 
at 4:35. The heat developed into a race for a show- 
ing of pace and range. Birds were scattered in weed 
cover and among the trees, but were not located by 
either dog. Up at 5:00. 

The judges then announced the awards — Blue Bon- 
net first, Jo second and Norah Blue third. 

The draw for the Members' stake Monday night 
was the following: Sister with Lemonade. Senator's 
Don with Trap. Hickory wood, a bye. 

Tuesday, January 25, 1910. — Section 15, southwest 
of Gosford station, was the ground selected for this 
morning. The first brace was put down at 9:20. 



Both dogs cut away at the word and sped off over 
the open grassy ground. This enabled the judges to 
get a line on the style, speed and bird hunting quali- 
ties of the dogs. Going on through scattered trees 
and heavy brush coverts the course led to a grass- 
grown plateau. The morning was ideal for the game, 
after the cold, frosty night. 

The sun had warmed the open field and ground 
just enough to tempt the birds out of the shelter of 
the heavy brush to begin operations in the pecking 
line. 

Birds were soon located and the premier heat of 
the meeting was on. The pointer had something to 
spare over the setter in speed and far ranging. The 
setter had the class and finish so desirable for the 
upland sportsman. For ten minutes it was nip and 
tuck between these two thoroughbreds. Point after 
point was called by the owner-handlers. Lansing 
Tevis in charge of Sister and Joe Terry handling 
Lemmie. 

At the order of the judges, pointed birds were 
flushed and shot by both owners. Bach dog was 
steady to the report of the shotgun and remained 
stanch when the birds flushed. Joe Terry in this 
heat won encomiums from the assemblage of sports- 
men, intently following every detail of the race. 
Terry's shotgun work was clever to a degree. 

A pleasing feature of the heat developed when 
I.emonade retrieved a bird and returning to master 
dropped into a neat point with the retrieved quail 
in her mouth. These two seasoned dogs put up the 
best race of the meeting. Both are endowed with 
plenty of "bird-sense," and each honored the other s 
point with the proper backing. Both were merry and 
had the style, but the pointer covered the most 
ground. 

Senator's Don-Trap — Cast off at 9:45 working back 
over the same and adjacent territory. Don handled 
by Jack Flynn. Trap handled by Gjrdon Tevis. Don 
is a son of the famous pointer Ch. Senator P. He 
is a most desirable looking dog, speedy, and a good 
worker over ground, but he was handicapped in one 
respect. He arrived at Bakersfield in the morning 
by express, and within an hour was put down in the 
field — rather a long call on a dog's abilities. His 
work on birds during the day in this and another 
heat was not up to requirements. He slobbered 
sadly when he should have made a bevy point. Trap 
made the most pleasing points, and showed style 
and class all the way. In this, however, he did not 
keep up his efforts in succeeding heats, rather in- 
different at the end. Up at 10:15. 

Hickorywood, a bye — Down in Section 16 adjoin- 
ing, at 10:30. Hickory was handled by Lansing 
Tevis. He proved to be an excellent shooting dog, 
a bit slow by age and did not show the class to 
carry him any further in the stake. 

The judges called for Sister and Trap to run the 
first heat of the second series. 

Sister-Trap — Sent away in Section 20 at 11:10. 
This heat was a pleasing one, Sister circled rings 
around her kennel mate. Trap came close to potter- 
ing on birds several times. Sister's work on birds 
was very good. She is a seasoned and well trained 
bitch now, her Derby evolutions on rabbits when she 
was a green one were remembered by more than 
one of the sportsmen present. Up at 11:45. 

The judges announced the winners: Sister first. 
Trap second. Lemonade third. 

Adjournment for lunch at the Gosford ranch house. 
The draw for the All-Age after refreshments was as 
follows: Tiburon with Trap. Eurydice with Sister. 
Blue Boy with Hickorywood. Senator's Don, a bye. 

Tiburon-Trap — Cast off at 2:05 in Section 17, away 
over the open grassy field, Tiburon had the range 
and pace on the pointer. She is very intense and 
merry in her work, quartering her ground accepta- 
bly and going high headed with a merry tail. Both 
dogs passed through cover that yielded birds, flushed 
by the cavalcade following. Both dogs finally got 
on birds and showed class, each backing the other 
on point. Tiburon was credited with 3 steady points. 
Trap made 2 and also put up a flush, this being his 
i bird heat for the day, he was a bit unsteady at 
the close. Up at 2:45. 

Eurydice-Sister — Driving over to Section 21, this 
pair took the word at 3:10. The pointer cut into 
her work in snappy style throughout most of this 
heat, making several sylish points. Eurydice is very 
speedy and stylish and a fine ranger and quarterer, 
but neglected to establish herself on birds severa? 
times. She was credited with 2 points, she evidently 
needs a bit more finishing work on birds. Up at 
3:40. 

Blue Boy-Hickory wood — Cast off at 3:45 through 
the same ground. Blue Boy outfooted the pointer 
all through the heat. Hickory could not resist a 
brush after rabbits. Blue worked nicely when birds 
were located. Up at 4:15. 

Senator's Don, a bye — Put down at 4:25 in the 
north end of same section. Don showed to good ad- 
vantage so far as his ranging and pace qualities 
went, but on birds he was deficient. 

Wednesday, January 26, 1910.— The first heat of 
the second series was between Tiburon and Sister. 
The brace was cast off at 9:45 in a field known as 
Section 22, seven miles southwest of Bakersfield. 
The ground was open with plenty of low, grassy 
cover. An unobstructed view of the dogs as they 
made wide casts and quartered the ground in search 
of birds showed that the setter outpaced and out- 
ranged the pointer. Birds were finally located by 
Tiburon, who pointed nicely and was steady. After 
the birds scattered they were followed and relocated. 

The pointer seemed to rely on her handler for 
direction, stayed in rather close and made several 



||j j III//, 



Saturday, February 5, 1910.] 



points. Each dog showed good class in handling 
the birds, far belter than their efforts of the preced- 
ing day. Up at 10:35. 

Eurydice-Senator's Don — Put down at 10:40 on 
ground where birds had previously been located. In 
this heat Don redeemed himself for slovenly work 
on Tuesday. His speed, style and range being very 
acceptable. Don pointed several birds and was 
stanch throughout. The setter missed several op- 
portunities to locate birds and establish herself. Her 
outside performance, however, made up the balance 
for a look in with Den on the award for equal third. 
Don ran in this series under the rule that 
allows the bye dog in the first series to go against 
another dog in the second series. 



Summary. 

Bakersfield, January 24, 1910. — Pacific Coast Field 
Trial Club's twenty-seventh Annual Derby, for 
pointers and setters whelped on or after January 
1, 1908. Cups to placed dogs, purse divided 50, 30 and 
20 per cent, 17 nominations, 9 starters — 8 English 
setters, 1 pointer. Judges. Wm. Dormer, P. H. 
Bryson. 

I. 

Jo, liver and white pointer dog, Houghton's Doc- 
Queen, whelped March 8, 1908. Lloyd Tevis, Stock- 
dale, owner. M. R. Dodge, handler. 

with 

The Judge, white, black and tan English setter 
dog, Ch. Count Whitestone-Glimmer, whelped May 
6, 1908. F. J. Ruhstaller, Sacramento, owner. W. 
B. Coutts, handler. 

Shasta Queen, white and lemon English setter 
bitch, Ch. Count Whitestone-Glimmer, whelped May 
6, 1908. Jos. E. Terry, Sacramento, Cal.. owner. W. 
B. Coutts, handler. 

with 

Caesar's Keepsake, black, white and tan English 
setter bitch, Caesar-Keepsake, whelped June 1, 1908. 
W. H. Estabrook, Idaho City, owner. W. B. Coutts, 
handler. 

Linda H., black, white and tan English setter bitch, 
Cavalier-Belinda, whelped April — , 1908. A. R. 
Hardin, San Francisco, owner. \V. B. Coutts, 
handler. 

with 

Miss Ives, black, white and ticked English setter 
bitch, St. Ives-Kil's Moxie, whelped June 1, 1908, 
S. Christenson, San Francisco, owner. W. B. Coutts, 
handler. 

Blue Bonnet, white, black and ticked English set- 
ter bitch, Boy Blue-Tiburon, whelped , 1908, 

J. B. Chase, San Francisco, owner. W. B. Coutts, 
handler. 

with 

Belvidere, black, white and tan English setter dog, 
Caesar-Keepsake, whelped June 1, 1909. S. Chris- 
tenson, San Francisco, owner. W. B. Coutts, handler 

Norah Blue, white, black and ticked English setter 

bitch, Boy Blue-Lackawana, whelped 1908. 

J. G. Roberts, Madera, owner. W. B. Coutts, handler. 
A ble. 

n. 

Blue Bonnet with Jo. 
The Judge with Belvidere. 
Norah Blue, reserve. 

First, Blue Bonnet. Second. .If). Third, Norah 
Blue. 

Bakersfield, January 25, 1910. — Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club's twenty-seventh annual Members' Stake, 
5 nominations, 5 starters — 4 pointers, I Eng- 
lish setter. Judges, Wm. Dormer, P. H. Bryson. 
Cups to winners, purse, 50, 30 and 20 per cent. 
I. 

Sister, liver and white pointer bitch, Combination 
Boy-Pearl's Jingo. Lansing Tevis, Stockdale, owner 
and handler. 

with 

Lemonade, white and lemon English setter bitch, 
Ch. Kilgarif-Belle Fontaine. Jos. E. Terry, Sacra- 
mento, owner and handler. 

Senator's Don, white and lemon pointer dog, by 
Ch. Senator P.-Flynn's Dolly Jingo. J. W. Flynn, San 
Francisco, owner and handler. 

with 

Trap, white and liver pointer dog, Sandalwood- 
Bessie. Gordon Tevis, Stockdale, owner and handler. 

Hickorywood, white and liver pointer dog, Ch. 
Cuba of Kenwood-Petronella. Lansing Tevis, Stock- 
dale, owner and handler, a bye. 

EL 

Trap with Sister. 

First, Sister. Second, Trap. Third, Lemonade. 

Bakersfield, January 25, 1910.— Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club's twenty-seventh annual All-Age Stake, 
7 nominations, 7 starters — 4 pointers, 3 English 
setters. Cups to winner, purse 50, 30 and 20 per 
cent. Judges, Wm. Dormer, P. H. Bryson. 

I. 

Tiburon, white, black and ticked English setter 
bitch, Uncle Jimmie Whitestone-Belle Fontaine. E. 
Courtney Ford, San Francisco, owner. W. B. Coutts, 
handler. 

with 

Trap, liver and white pointer dog, Sandalwood-Bessie, 
Gordon Tevis, Stockdale, owner. M. R. Dodge, 
handler. 

Eurydice, white, black and ticked English setter 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



bitch, Ch. Kilgarif-Moxev Danstone. Jos. E. Terry, 
Sacramento, owner. VY. B. Coutts, handler. 

with 

Sister, liver and white pointer bitch. Combination 
Hoy-Pearl's Jingo. Lansing Tevis, Stockdale, owner. 
M. R. Dodge, handler. 

Blue Boy, white, black, tan and ticked English 
setter dog, Boy Blue-Lackawana. A. A. Moore, San 
Francisco, owner. XV. B. Coutts, handler. 

with 

Hickorywood, white and liver pointer dog, Ch. 
Cuba of Kenwood-Petronella. Lansing Tevis, Stock- 
dale, owner. M. R. Dodge, handler. 

Senator's Don, white and lemon pointer dog, Ch. 
Senator P.-Flynn's Dolly Jingo. . J, W. Flynn, San 
Francisco, owner. W. B. Coutts, handler. 

II. 

Tiburon with Sister. 
Eurydice with Senator's Don. 

First, Tiburon. Second, Sister. Equal third, Eury- 
dice, Senator's Don. 

o 

GOOSE SHOOTING IN THE NORTHWEST. 



The sport of wild goose shooting in California has 
been given frequent mention in these columns. The 
methods employed by the professional hunters, who 
take charge of shooting parties, their remarkable 
skill in calling the aerial caravans into the blinds, 
the live goose decoys and numerous accessories to 
the sport have been explained to our readers. In 
contrast we give here a story by a writer in Rod and 
Gun in Canada, descriptive of a goose shooting trip, 
presumably in Alberta or possibly Calgary Province: 

I had been told that the days of stirring adventure 
were past in the West, or, at least, in that part of 
the West where I then was located, and so was 
content with the prospect of a goose-hunt in company 
with three other young fellows of my acquaintance. 
I changed my mind about the reported docility of the 
West before another day was done. 

We started out in a buckboard the night before, 
with the necessary equipment for a successful shoot, 
consisting of four 10-gauge guns, which we managed 
to procure in the village, enough ammunition to stock 
a first-class battleship for a week, and provisions cal- 
culated to last the day. We had also about a dozen 
good decoys, and sufficient white cotton cloth to 
make more if we required them. I was informed that 
a piece of stick with some white cloth wrapped 
around it and stuck in the ground was quite sufficient 
in the early grey of the morning to fool the wariest 
goose into approaching within gun-range, and I 
found that it really was. Thus equipped, we then 
set out in the evening for a disused stable on one 
of the old Hudson Bay sections, about a mile from 
the place where we intended to commence operations 
in the morning. It was a glorious moonlight night, 
with just the suspicion of frost in the air, and not 
a breath of wind was blowing. Houses were scarce 
in the district in which we were driving owing to the 
fact that the country was largely hay-flat, stretching 
away to the lake, and of little use for farming of 
any kind. The stable, when we reached it, proved to 
be little better than a shelter from the sun, being 
built of rough lumber which had shrunk and left 
large chinks between the boards; the roof was of 
straw spread on poles about a foot apart, and the 
windows and doors were gone. Altogether good ven- 
tilation was its only merit as a dwelling for the night. 
Our horse we blanketed and tied outside, feeding it 
with some hay which we found at the edge of a 
slough near by. Then we spread some of the hay 
on the floor of the building for beds and composed 
ourselves for a few hours' sleep. 

I had been unfortunate enough to choose a place 
directly beneath the window, and the chilly breeze 
kept playing over my uncovered body. I burrowed 
into the hay and found myself on the hard ground, 
feeling cramped and cold. The others must have 
been affected in the same manner, for one of the 
party rose in the early hours of the morning, and, 
clearing away a bare spot in the center of the floor, 
lit a fire from the scattered hay and twigs around 
the building. It smoked a good deal at first, but 
soon flared up into a cheerful blaze, and we were 
enjoying the heat which was thrown out when it 
was discovered that the sparks were flying upwards 
and lodging in the straw roof, which commenecd to 
crack'e and burn where the straw was dry. There 
was a wild rush for the door, and everybody fran- 
tically searched around for some means to quench 
the fire. An old battered pail was at length found 
among a pile of rubbish at the end of the shed, and, 
while one of our party mounted the now burning 
roof, the others kept running to and from the near- 
by slough, carrying water until the incipient con- 
flagration was put out. The exercise warmed us 
somewhat but our nerves were not in a condition to 
allow of sleep for some time. When we did finally 
drop off, it was only to be awakened in a somewhat 
rude manner. 

I can hardly explain the effect which was produced 
by the sound which shattered our slumbers, for it 
resembled nothing in the world which I had ever 
heard. It was as if all the demons of the infernal 
regions had broken loose in one horrible, inharmoni- 
ous, fiendish chorus. It ran into all the keys of 
about five octaves, and was composed of all the dis- 
cords possible between the first and the fifth. It 
froze the blood, it set the teeth on edge, it sent a 
cold shiver down the spine, and it made you wish 
for home. And while I was shivering and holding 
my breath in fear lest my very breathing might dis- 
cover my whereabouts to the singers of the infernal 
chorus, a figure reared itself between me and the 



moon in the narrow window aperture — a figure which 
framed itself, huge, and shaggy, and grim, against 
the white light of the full moon, and looked within 
at us lying there. I was too much paralyzed to so 
much as call out ; but when I did sufficiently gain 
control of my faculties 1 uttered such a yell as made 
the chorus without cease for very shame that they 
could not equal it. The intruder, more frigtened 
than I, leaped down from its point of observation, 
and we could hear its soft pad, pad, as it scurried 
away a short distance and then sat down to con- 
sider matters. We all made for the door, and could 
perceive numerous figures flitting about in the moon- 
light among the scattered scrub, looking preternatur- 
ally large and weird in the moonlight, for when 
we had fully wakened up and recovered from the 
first shock of fear we realized that these noisy break- 
ers of our peace were merely the cowardly, harmless 
prairie prowlers known as coyotes. They had been 
accustomed to use the place as a general rendezvous 
for their evening concerts, and were probably more 
surprised and frightened at our appearance than we 
were at theirs — though I doubt that very much. We 
had a couple of shots at them as they slunk away, 
but our aim was uncertain in the moonlight, and our 
shooting only served to accelerate their departure. 
Their fitful howls could be heard all night, but they 
never approached near enough to be really disagree- 
able again. 

After all the hairbreadth escapes and hair-raising 
adventures of the night, our tempers were in no state 
to endure quietly the next misfortune which met us. 
Our horse, which we had tied securely outside, had 
broken loose, terrified, no doubt, by the howling of 
our midnight visitors, and when we came to the 
place where we had left him we found nothing but 
the broken halter, still securely tied to the poles 
outside the shed. Our hearts were too full for 
words, but the few which we did utter made the very 
moon hide her face behind a cloud for shame. There 
was nothing for it but to set out on a systematic 
hunt, which we did, going out in all directions from 
the building. We were on the point of giving up the 
search till daylight, when one of the searchers to 
the north called out to us that he had sighted the 
animal. We had no difficulty in capturing him, as he 
was feeding quietly at a hay-coil on the other side 
of the slough. We led him back triumphantly by 
the forelock ,and that ended our adventures for the 
night. 

By this time the moon was sinking in the west, 
and everything indicated that it would not be long 
till dawn. We therefore concluded that it was not 
worth while going back to sleep. The prospect of 
goose-shooting, after the adventures of the night, 
seemed tame in comparison, and our enthusiasm and 
sporting zeal were dampened by lack of sleep, and 
by the chilliness of the "hour before the dawn." We 
were tired and irritable and cold and hungry, and we 
spoke to each other in monosyllables, for we felt 
offended in an unreasoning sort of way for the loss 
of our night's sleep. Nevertheless, we hitched up, 
bundled into the buggy, and set out for our desti- 
nation, which was a stubble field at some distance 
to windward of the lake. Thither we expected the 
geese to fly on their way to their feeding grounds 
from their night quarters on the lake. We unshipped 
our equipment, and, while one of the party proceeded 
with the horse some distance, and tied him to the 
buggy, the others set to work to fix the decoys and 
to scoop out holes in the ground some distance apart, 
where we might lie concealed as the morning flight 
came over. These holes we lined with straw and 
stubble, on which we lay, covering ourselves over 
with like material. The ground was fairly warm, 
and we were more comfortable in our lairs than we 
had been in the shed, and there we lay watching, too 
sleepy and tired to be optimistic. 

The moon w#s very low in the west, and the sky 
in the east had the leaden-grey color which presages 
the dawn. The decoys scattered round us looked 
singularly ghostlike in the uncertain light, and alto- 
gether everything seemed about us as dead and dis- 
couraging as it well could. I commenced to doze, 
and awakened with a start as a great white owl 
flapped low above our hiding-places, attracted, no 
doubt, by the appearance of the white decoys, and 
then passed noiselessly away on its early morning 
quest. 

The minutes passed on leaden wings, the sky in 
the east took on a reddish tinge, and a strange whis- 
tling little breeze began to play in the stubble — the 
first intimation of life in that dead stillness. 

How long we lay there, alternately dozing and 
watching dreamily those ghostly decoys, I don't 
know, but it seemed hours. We were stiff and 
cramped on account of the close quarters in which 
we lay, and too lethargic to think of changing our 
positions. And then suddenly all our senses became 
alert, every vestige of sleepiness left us, and we were 
in a moment wide awake, eager sportsmen, with guns 
tight-gripped and nervous linger on the trigger-guard. 
For suddenly, from over the lake to westward, there 
came to our listening ears the faintest sound im- 
aginable, one solitary, querulous little cry, as a child 
just half-awake. It was repeated at different points, 
till the whole lake seemed alive with it, and finally 
it became merged into one volume of sound, which 
ever increased in loudness till it became a clanging, 
cackling, discord of calls and cries and screams. 
The day was awake! Then, when the screaming 
was at its loudest, the air boomed with the roar of 
rushing pinions, and our game was on the wing. 
These roars were repeated at intervals as detached 
and late-Sleeping flocks awoke and took flight. 

Wat a few moments we waited, tense with excite- 
ment, with our eyes strained over the grey reaches 



It THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN [Saturday, February 5, 1910. 



of the lake for any sight of the oncoming flock. The 
noise had somewhat subsided by this time, and was 
more orderly in character. Suddenly, out of the grey 
of the sky, a tremulous wave of misty forms became 
visible, advancing straight towards us. 

On they came, a long V-shaped line, with a great 
grey goose at the apex, and his followers in regular 
order behind, the ends of the line tremulous, and 
seeming to sway with the breeze. The first shaft 
of the rising sun shot up behind us, turning the stub- 
ble to gold, and as the great wavy line came on their 
snowy pinions flashed silver in its rays. Nearer 
they came, cleaving the air with the apex of the V 
as the prow of a ship might cleave the water. In my 
admiration of the sight I almost forgot that we were 
there for the express purpose of breaking up that 
line and spoiling its symmetry— ambushed enemies 
lying in wait for that well-marshalled host, to 
deal havoc among its ranks and disorganize its for- 
mation. 

The great grey leader caught sight of the decoys 
before the flock was within range, and swung aside 
to contemplate them giving vent to friendly ques- 
tioning cries. The entire flocks deviated after the 
leader, and began circling in ever-converging arcs, 
as if in the attitude to alight. Nearer and nearer, 
lower and lower they came, still we could see their 
eyes and mark the great strength of pinion and 
mighty width of breast. Their line was broken, and 
they were dissolved into a disorderly, screaming 
flock. Then it was that we let loose and pumped all 
the eight barrels of our 10-bore artillery into their 
disorganized ranks, reloading quickly before the 
surprised and scattered flock could get out of range, 
and letting them have four more barrels. With a 
mighty roar of wings they flung themselves back, 
the great grey leader screaming commands, seem- 
ing himself impervious to the rain of BB shot which 
hailed around him, and strewed the stubble with the 
white bodies of his comrades. Then they were out 
of range, forming ranks again with angry, surprised 
screams at the treacherw which had been i>erpetrated 
upon them. And then we came out of our lairs and 
counted the dead. There were twelve in all, and 
four badly wounded, which we pursued and quickly 
put out of misery — not bad for three minutes' shoot- 
ing. No more flocks, however, came our way for 
the rest of the morning. 

We sat back, lit our pipes, and surveyed the scene. 
The sun was fully up, shining gold across the stubble, 
which crackled in the heat. The chilliness had 
gone out of the atmosphere, and the warmth was 
very grateful to our cramped and numbed limbs. We 
were contented with the supreme contest of success- 
ful sportsmen after a good bag; and we silently 
voted that life was worth living and that we had had 
a good morning's sport. 

o 

GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



The open season for wild ducks and shore birds, 
locally, is in the sere and yellow. The season for 
quail shooting closed January 31st. The close sea- 
son for wild ducks and shore birds will begin on 
February 15th. The open season for English or 
Wilson snipe will continue, more's the pity until 
April 1st. It is to be hoped that this long open 
period on these dainty game birds will be curtailed 
at the next session of our legislature. As it is 
now the birds are shot, towards the end of the open 
season, after they have mated and have commenced 
the breeding season. 

Shooting conditions hereabout for the past week 
have been rather desultory. So far as limits or 
even fair bags are concerned, the sport is practically 
ended now. Here and there, however, the pres- 
ence of birds induces gunners to take a day off and 
out after the birds. The best shooting from now 
on will prevail around the bay shores where the 
canvasbacks and bluebills congregate. 

The locality of their gatherings, however, is gener- 
ally uncertain, depending upon the direction of the 
wind. The birds usually work over to both sides of 
the bay shores when the weather is stormy enough 
to make the bay waters an uncomfortable resting 
place. The all-round marsh grubber, the spoonbill, 
generally acts in unison with the deep-water birds. 

The deepwater ducks have had a pummeling this 
season that has made them pretty wary. They have 
a fashion now of pitching into the bay marsh lands 
and sloughs during the night hours in search of food. 
Before daybreak they seek the bay water expanse 
for rest and safety from the gunners. On these in- 
and-out Alights their course over dangerous locali- 
ties is at a very high elevation. 

The other ducks have generally left the marsh 
feeding places for the fresh water puddles and 
overflows. Here they find all kinds of floating seeds, 
fresh vegetation and insects as well. The sprig 
are greedy to find newly overflowed fields where 
they gorge themselves on crickets they find ma- 
rooned on lumps of adobe. The recent heavy rains 
have created so many fresh water ponds and puddles 
all over the country districts that the birds have 
scattered so much it is now very difficult to find 
them in large flocks and also very hard to "work" 
them out in the open. 

Last Sunday the bay marshes were enfolded in 
a heavy tule fog and at comparatively few resorts 
was there much shooting indulged in. 

The previous week, Sunday morning opened up 
dark and gloomy, the threatened rain fell, accom- 
panied by a strong southeast wind. Coupled with 
this heavy weather was an extremely high tide 
in the ear'y hours and forenoon. These conditions 
handicapped most of the marsh guns, but in many 
sections favored the bay shore shooters when the 



birds took wing for lee shores and sheltering sloughs. 

Along the San Pablo shores many canvasback and 
bluebills were bagged. At Sobrante there was excel- 
lent "can" and bluebill shooting. Tom Fllery was 
one of many limit engineers. Jules Bruns and .Jack 
McGovern had a cut in on these birds last Tues- 
day from blinds near the Vigorit shore. On this 
particular day in that locality the birds came in 
under the lee of the shore hills in flocks of thous- 
ands. 

The east side bay flats are studded, from Sixteenth 
street, Oakland, clear up to the Selby smelters, with 
duck blinds. Some are floating contrivances, cov- 
ered with brush or tules, inside of which the gun- 
ner and his boat are concealed; others are built up 
on platforms. Even isolated piles have been util- 
ized, fitted up with a crow's nest blind hung up 
just out of reach of the tide, where the sharpshooter 
remains perched in cramped quarters until the tide 
goes out or he is taken off in a boat. In some coves 
there is the semblance of a village of lake dwellers, 
so numerous are the tule-covered duck deadfalls. 

How casualties are avoided is a problem, for many 
blinds are close enough to each other to make the 
sport exceedingly dangerous if the birds are flying 
in numbers. On one pond near Giant, good for one 
blind, there are four tule-covered boxes, all within 
a radius of sixty yards. Some of the floating blinds 
are compact and built on the battle-ship order, ap- 
parently impervious to shot; others again are flimsy 
as spider webs. 

Probably the most unique and original locations 
yet selected for duck-shooting covers are the cement 
built-up man holes projecting from the upper sur- 
faces of the big sewers leading from the Oakland 
shores off the Sixteenth-street station. Here these 
big cement sewers run out nearly a quarter of a 
mile. At high tide they are submerged, the small, 
round manhole towers loom up like so many light- 
houses. On top the independent gunner perches him- 
self, laying low for a crack at any careless ducks 
that fly by anywhere inside of 100 yards, often over 
that distance! 

Last Sunday along the Oakland and Berkeley 
shores there was a small army of oilskin-coated and 
gumbooted men and boys ready for any duck or 
ducks that came their way. It must be great sport, 
for when one shooter has a chance to blaze away, 
there is also equal opportunity for the whole bunch 
near by. Should the bird fall, there is a general 
scramble for the duck, if there is anything left of 
it after the fusilade. 

A number of the Suisun duck clubs have practi- 
cally closed the season since the loth instant, on ac- 
count of high water and the noticeable decrease in 
the webfoot supply. The exceptionally high tide 
two weeks ago put plenty of water all over the 
marsh, going over the levees in many places. 

Captain Seymour recently purchased the last piece 
of the old Chamberlain estate, located on the west 
side of the tract, some 250 acres in all, and with 
several other sportsmen will form a club. These 
new grounds are about a mile above the Cordelia 
Club preserve, in the Cordelia slough, and can be 
reached by launch from Cygnus. It is further ru- 
mored that a wealthy gentleman and prominent 
sportsman has purchased the Harriman preserve, 
formerly the duck-hunting lodge of the late Herman 
Oelrichs, and will soon commence improving the 
place and prepairing for a campaign against the 
ducks next season. 

Two weeks ago the Allegre preserve had no 
shooters, the Cordelia preserve also was silent. At 
the Ibis Club Ed McGary shot on Saturday and got 
a few nice birds, but no one shot there Sunday. 
Guy Karl and his son were at the old Harvey plan' 
and secured a nice little bag of bluebills and can- 
vasbacks on Saturday, but the ponds were given 
over to the birds again on Sunday. 

On the preserve of the Volatile Club Harry 
Blatchly scored a fine limit of sprig and teal. Jim 
.Maynard, bagged twenty-one birds. Pete Howard, 
Walter Kaufman and John Mahoney averaged about 
a dozen apiece, all fine birds. 

Last Sunday Maynard, Doc McKee, Pete Howard 
with Tom Macauley, H. W. Welch and Louis Lolf- 
quest as guests, enjoyed a fair shoot on ducks and 
JCnglish snipe. Macauley who is 72 years of age and 
a veteran duck shooter, was in a blind with Maynard 
and shot a half dozen teal. 

At Calhoun's place eight or ten guns enlivened the 
sport all day long. W. Leavitt, a guest, was high 
gun, with fourteen fat ducks; the balance got from 
half a dozen birds apiece up. No one shot at the 
Family Club, the Oelrichs place or at Green Lodge. 

On the inland Alameda marsh ponds shooting has 
been of a desultory character, what birds, if any, 
gunners at the different resorts have shot, have 
been spoonbills, in pretty good condition for this 
time of the season. A'ong the bay shore the sport 
has been fairly good for "blueys" and "cans." 

In the vicinity of Sears point, on the Sonoma 
marsh, with the exception of Tubus island, every 
section frequented by the hunters has been devoid 
of ducks. On the island preserve the "cans" are 
so thick that one could not drive them away with 
a club. 

Richardson's bay has proved a pleasing shooting 
ground for over a week. Charles Bouton has a 
blind near Tiburon and has been getting a good 
shoot dally. 

Black brant shooting in Toniales bay has been 
only fair. The birds have become extra wary, hav- 
ing been well hunted this season. 



Fishing for steelhead trout In, or above, tidewater 
is now in close season until April 1st. Last Sunday 
was the final opportunity for indulgence In this 
sport. The best catch reported was made at 
Schellville on Sonoma creek, where a half dozen 
local anglers landed 16 fine fish averaging about 12 
pounds each. 

The largest steelhead reported this season as the 
prize for a local rodster kept Louis Gotthelf busy 
for a while Sunday, January 25th, in Paper Mill 
creek tidewater near Point Reyes station, Marin 
county. The fish was a handsome specimen and 
fresh run from the ocean. It was a "buck" and 
weighed nineteen pounds, the heltiest steelhead 
trout caught in that resort for many years past. But 
few other fish were caught, weather conditions not 
being congenial for the sport. The rod enthusiasts 
present were George A. Wentworth, George Roberts, 
Attorney Perry, Al Barker, Harry Baker, Frank 
Smith, "Midnight" Miller, "Parson" Jackson, Wil- 
liam Kennedy, "Cottager" Christ, John Boedefelde, 
B. Bucker, George Uri, Mose Uri, Joe Uri and others. 
Last Sunday a few small trout were caught. 

Russian river, near Duncan's Mills, was still on 
the visiting list of a few anglers. William Mackay, 
among others, spent several days at the river pools 
and holes and caught seven steelhead running about 
five and six pounds each In weight. 

The recent rains flavoring the saline waters have 
induced the steelhead to "come in" everywhere. The 
fish have entered at the Golden Gate and spread 
out in various directions. The Oakland estuary 
in days gone by used to be quite a satisfactory fish- 
ing ground. That these trout still frequent the rather 
savory waters over that way is shown by a curi- 
ous incident, for which John Fatjo is the sponsor. 
One day recently he saw a large fish jump from the 
water near the Park-street bridge. The fish hap- 
pened to land in a boat that was moored there. 
Fatjo got busy immediately and soon secured the 
fish. It proved to be a steelhead that scaled eight 
pounds. 

Near Schellville. Sonoma creek, recently yielded 
fair returns for several anglers. Al Martin, Bob 
Johnson, John Stevens and a number of Schellville 
fishers. The fish caught were large ones. Both 
Sonoma and Petaluma creeks once afforded excellent 
steelhead sport. Possibly, under favorable condi- 
tions, the fishing is still good. It has been the ex- 
ception, however, of late years for much prospect- 
ing by our local anglers in those waters. 

Above Napa, a mile and a half, in Napa creek, 
there is a dam. Below this dam there was a fine 
pool. The pool is still there, about fifty feet in di- 
ameter, but it needs cleaning out badly, if good fish- 
ing is desired. Brush and other debris choke up the 
water so much that all chance for playing a fish 
hooked there is out of the question. Should a steel- 
head get a lew feet of line out, odds on that it will 
escape. Two weeks ago the pool was full of big 
trout, plainly to be seen swimming here and there. 
The creek further down, which once was a favorite 
with anglers, is also pretty well obstructed with 
wi lows and other growths. About forty "natives," 
mostly foreigners, were after the luckless trout that 
Sunday with a vengeance — and also rods and hand 
lines. Walter .1. Burllngame tried a number of casts 
in the orthodox style, and caught several trout. The 
largest trout landed was a twelve-pounder. 

Pescadero creek, in San Mateo county, is re- 
ported as being well supplied with steelhead trout. 
Charles F. Breidenstein and Fred Sarcander of Pu- 
rissima have caught some fine fish there since Fri- 
day. Another inducement lor the presence of these 
two sportsmen at that resort is a near-by snipe- 
shooting patch and anundance of fresh mushrooms, 
to be found on adjacent pasture lands. 

There was very recently a large run of steelhead 
trout in the San Lorenzo river in Santa Cruz county, 
reported to be the most prolific visit of the fish for 
several years. The trout are working their way up 
to the head-waters spawning grounds of that stream 
and not neglecting the tributary creeks. 

In Monterey bay recently big steel-head were ob- 
served in large numbers in the waters along the 
shore from Monterey up as far as Del Monte. 

Local anglers are always on the qui vive for trout 
notes from Santa Cruz county and Monterey bay. 
In that territory there are over thirty available 
streams and creeks. The present data is an accept- 
able tip for the 1st of April coming. 

Handline fishermen are jubilant over the appear- 
ance of tomcod in the buy. The fish run rather small, 
however. Powell-street wharf has been daily the re- 
sort of many tomcodders. This fish is not only a 
sweet panfish, but is a game fighter. On light tackle 
it shows a surprising lot of ginger. 

COMING EVENTS. 



Bench SIiomm. 

Feb 8-11 — Fanciers' Association of Indiana. In- 
dianapolis, Ind. C. R. Millhouse, Sec'y. Entries 
close Feb. 1. _ , 

Feb. 9-12 — Westminster Kennel Club. New York 
City. Wm. Rauch, Chairman. 

Feb. 22-25 — New England Kennel Club. Boston. Chas. 
W. Taylor Jr., Sec'y. 

March 1-3 — Pine Tree Kennel Club. Portland, Me. 
Elinor S. Moody. Sec'y. 
March 1-4 — Buffalo Kennel Club. Buffalo, N. Y. 
Seymour P. White, Sec'y. 

March 2-4 — Central New York Kennel Association. 
Utica, N. Y. Thos. S. Jackson, Sec'y. 

March 8-11 — Erie Kennel Club. Erie, Pa. Lyman 
T. Whitehead, Sec'y. 

March 16-19 — Duquesne Kennel Club of Western